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Bruce Damonte

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The Avery Mixed Use Building / OMA

14:00 - 14 June, 2019
The Avery Mixed Use Building / OMA, © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte + 11

  • Architects

    OMA
  • Location

    488 Folsom St, San Francisco, CA 94105, United States
  • Category

  • Lead/Tower Architect

    OMA
  • Podium Building Architect

    Fougeron Architecture
  • Area

    906470.0 ft2
  • Photographs

Triple Barn House / Mork-Ulnes Architects

19:00 - 9 June, 2019
Triple Barn House / Mork-Ulnes Architects , © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte + 18

  • Architects

  • Location

    Sonoma, United States
  • Category

  • Design Team

    Greg Ladigin, Lexie Mork-Ulnes, Casper Mork-Ulnes, Kyle Anderson, Phi Van Phan, Signe Rohlin
  • Area

    1751.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

San Joaquin Villages at the University of California / SOM + LOHA + KDA + KieranTimberlake

03:00 - 29 May, 2019
San Joaquin Villages at the University of California / SOM + LOHA + KDA + KieranTimberlake, © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte + 33

Harmon Guest House / David Baker Architects

17:00 - 27 May, 2019
Harmon Guest House / David Baker Architects, © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Angie Silvy © Angie Silvy + 51

Moose Road / Mork-Ulnes Architects

17:00 - 18 May, 2019
Moose Road / Mork-Ulnes Architects , © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte + 24

  • Architects

  • Location

    Ukiah, United States
  • Category

  • Design Team

    Greg Ladigin, Casper Mork-Ulnes, Andreas Tingulstad
  • Area

    1140.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : A-B-C

07:00 - 30 April, 2019
ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : A-B-C , © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

It is expected that within the next couple of decades, Earth will have absolutely nothing left to offer whoever/whatever is capable of surviving on it. Although the human race is solely responsible for the damages done to the planet, a thin silver lining can still be seen if radical changes were to be done to the way we live on Earth and how we sustain it. 

Since architects and designers carry a responsibility of building a substantial future, we have put together an A-Z list of every sustainability term that you might come across. Every week, a new set of letters will be published, helping you stay well-rounded on everything related to sustainable architecture and design. Here are the terms that start with letters A, B, and C.

How to Implement Passive Solar Design in Your Architecture Projects

04:00 - 10 April, 2019
How to Implement Passive Solar Design in Your Architecture Projects, Conservatory. Image © Onnis Luque
Conservatory. Image © Onnis Luque

Although the sun is almost 150 million kilometers away, this star has had the most impact on our planet. But while some are busy chasing the sun for sun-kissed skin, architects are all about creating sun-kissed spaces.

In definition, “passive solar energy is the collection and distribution of energy obtained by the sun using natural means”. The simple concept and process of implementing passive solar energy systems have provided buildings with heat, lighting, mechanical power, and electricity in the most environmentally-conscious way possible.

In this article, we will provide you with a complete guide of implementing passive solar systems in your designs.

Triple-Glass Facade. Image © Adrien Buchet Passive Office Building in Belgium . Image Courtesy of Neutelings Riedijk Architects Maison + Agence. Image © Philippe Ruault Sun Rain Room. Image © Edmund Sumner + 27

AIA Announces Winners of 2019 Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture

10:00 - 2 February, 2019
AIA Announces Winners of 2019 Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture

Nine projects have been recognized this year by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) in the 2019 Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture. A five-member jury evaluated entries’ sense of place and purpose, ecology and environmental sustainability, and history to choose this year’s most innovative interior spaces.

New United States Courthouse; Los Angeles, Los Angeles | Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP. Image © Bruce Damonte Apple Store, Upper East Side; New York City | Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Image © Peter Aaron Shirley Ryan AbilityLab; Chicago | Gensler. Image © Michael Moran Studio Dental II; San Francisco | Montalba Architects. Image © Kevin Scott + 36

How to Design for Optimal Thermal Comfort (And Why it Matters)

04:00 - 31 January, 2019
How to Design for Optimal Thermal Comfort (And Why it Matters), ZEB Pilot House - Pilot Project / Snøhetta. Image © Bruce Damonte
ZEB Pilot House - Pilot Project / Snøhetta. Image © Bruce Damonte

Have you ever found yourself losing a good night’s sleep due to an overly warm room? Or wearing four jackets and a scarf just to tolerate your office’s frigid air conditioning? Truth be told, you can’t please everyone when it comes to adjusting an indoor climate, and there is always that one unfortunate individual who ends up sacrificing their own comfort for the sake of others.

Evidently, there are no ‘universal standards’ or ‘recommended comfort ranges’ in designing building systems, since athletes training in a gym in Mexico will not feel comfortable in an interior with the same building systems of a nursing home in Denmark, for instance. Which is why, if we were to briefly define ‘thermal comfort’, it is the creation of building systems that are adapted to the local environment and functions of the space, cooperatively.

So how can we design for optimum thermal comfort?

© Saint-Gobain / illustration by Elisa Géhin © Saint-Gobain / illustration by Elisa Géhin © Saint-Gobain / illustration by Elisa Géhin Diagram by Snøhetta + 24

Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing

08:00 - 22 January, 2019
Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing, LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode
LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode

Sustainability awards and standards touted by professional architecture organizations often stop at opening day, failing to take into account the day-to-day energy use of a building. With the current format unlikely to change, how can we rethink the way what sustainability means in architecture today? The first step might be to stop rewarding purpose-built architecture, and look instead to the buildings we already have. This article was originally published on CommonEdge as"Why Reusing Buildings Should be the Next Big Thing."

At the inaugural Rio Conference on the Global Environment in 1992, three facts became abundantly clear: the earth was indeed warming; fossil fuels were no longer a viable source of energy; the built environment would have to adapt to this new reality. That year I published an essay in the Journal of Architectural Education called “Architecture for a Contingent Environment” suggesting that architects join with both naturalists and preservationists to confront this situation.

The AIA Toolkit for Architects in the Era of Climate Change

07:45 - 23 December, 2018
The AIA Toolkit for Architects in the Era of Climate Change, Mundo Verde at Cook Campus / Studio Twenty Seven Architecture
Mundo Verde at Cook Campus / Studio Twenty Seven Architecture

A misconception often surfaces in design circles that architectural beauty and evidence-based environmental performance are mutually exclusive. To address this, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment (COTE) is releasing a new tool that can assist architecture firms in designing high-performance energy-efficient buildings.

Despite the federal stance on paramount environmental issues, the AIA upholds and advocates for the responsibility of architects to mitigate against the effects of climate change. Aware that the construction industry consumes nearly 40% of the energy supply nationwide, the AIA COTE® Top Ten Toolkit presents a series of strategies to promote sustainability without compromising the design.

Albion District Library / Perkins + Will Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture / LMS Architects Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery / DLR Group Family House / LMS Architects + 6

Architecture without Architects: The Cut-Paste Typology Taking Over America

09:30 - 11 December, 2018
Architecture without Architects: The Cut-Paste Typology Taking Over America, Tejon 35 / Meridian 105 Architecture. Image © Raul Garcia
Tejon 35 / Meridian 105 Architecture. Image © Raul Garcia

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "When Buildings Are Shaped More by Code than by Architects."

Architects are often driven by forces which are stronger than aesthetics or even client whims and desires. To some extent we’re captive to the tools and materials we use, and the legal limitations placed on us as architects. Today a new code definition has changed one type of building in all of the ways architects usually control.

HillSide House / Zack | de Vito Architecture + Construction

22:00 - 24 November, 2018
HillSide House / Zack | de Vito Architecture + Construction, © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte + 25

Smart Homes That Use Domotics To Improve Quality of Life

04:00 - 22 November, 2018
© Paul Finkel
© Paul Finkel

Home automation, or Domotics, is a set of technologies applied to a residence to control lighting, climate, entertainment systems, and appliances. Its systems allow for efficient management of energy consumption, security, accessibility, and the general comfort of the building, becoming an important issue to consider when designing, building, and living.

Domotic systems are based on the collection of data by sensors, which are then processed to issue precise orders to the executors, varying the environmental quality of each enclosure according to the needs of the user. The pace of current life and the technological advances we have experienced in recent years have led to new ways of living, motivating the design of homes and more human, multifunctional and flexible buildings. What was once a luxury is now a feasible and effective solution for all types of projects.

In this article, we've compiled a collection of smart homes where domotics have been used.

© Kingkien © Beer Singnoi © Kingkien © Günther Richard Wett + 25

Spotlight: Rem Koolhaas

09:30 - 17 November, 2018
Spotlight: Rem Koolhaas, Casa da Musica. Image © Philippe Ruault
Casa da Musica. Image © Philippe Ruault

With the extensive list of acclaimed alumni of his firm, OMA, it is not a stretch to call Rem Koolhaas (born 17 November 1944) the godfather of contemporary architecture. Equal parts theorist and designer, over his 40-year career Koolhaas has revolutionized the way architects look at program and interaction of space, and today continues to design buildings that push the capabilities of architecture to new places.

Seattle Central Library / OMA + LMN. Image Courtesy of OMA Maison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA Fondazione Prada. Image © Bas Princen Casa da Musica. Image © Philippe Ruault + 39

Dr. George W. Davis Senior Residence and Senior Center / David Baker Architects

11:00 - 12 October, 2018
Dr. George W. Davis Senior Residence and Senior Center / David Baker Architects, © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte + 28

Using Architecture to Create a New Civic Movement: SHoP's Chris Sharples Speaks

09:30 - 3 October, 2018
Using Architecture to Create a New Civic Movement: SHoP's Chris Sharples Speaks, Courtesy of SHoP Architects
Courtesy of SHoP Architects

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "SHoP's Chris Sharples on Urban Architecture, Digital Fabrication, and the Public Realm."

Twin brothers Chris and Bill Sharples are two of the founding partners of SHoP Architects, a New York-based firm established 20 years ago to bring together diverse expertise in designing buildings and environments that improve the quality of public life.

The firm’s style is difficult to define, but a connective thread throughout SHoP’s portfolio is a design philosophy rooted in constraints. From digital models to next-generation fabrication and delivery techniques, technology is at the center of the firm’s movement toward an iterative approach that, as Chris Sharples says, “is beginning to blur the line between architecture and manufacturing.”

Courtesy of SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects and West8 © Bruce Damonte Courtesy of SHoP Architects + 8

Cultural Centers: 50 Examples in Plan and Section

06:00 - 9 September, 2018
Cultural Centers: 50 Examples in Plan and Section, Cortesía de Fabián Dejtiar
Cortesía de Fabián Dejtiar

How many times have you been faced with the challenge of designing a cultural center? While this may seem like quite a feat, many architects have had to design a program that blends a community center with culture.

Among the projects published on our site, we have found numerous examples that highlight different responses, from flexible configurations to sites that prioritize central gathering areas for citizens and activities. See our series of 50 community centers and their plans and sections below.