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Minsk

The Fossilized Soviet Architecture of Belarus, in Photos

09:30 - 21 February, 2017
The Fossilized Soviet Architecture of Belarus, in Photos, The Mound of Glory. A monument to the soldiers who fought for the liberation of Belarus during World War II. By architect O. Stakhovich and sculptor A. Bembel, 1967-1969. Image © Stefano Perego
The Mound of Glory. A monument to the soldiers who fought for the liberation of Belarus during World War II. By architect O. Stakhovich and sculptor A. Bembel, 1967-1969. Image © Stefano Perego

The history of what is now the Republic of Belarus is a turbulent one. It has been part of the Russian Empire, occupied by the Germans during both World Wars, divided between Poland and the Soviet Union, and finally declared its independence in 1991. Although Belarus is now an independent nation, it is also an isolated dictatorship that has in some ways remained unchanged since the 1990s, and is largely seen both culturally and architecturally as a sort of time warp, Europe's most vivid window into life in the Soviet Union.

Photographer Stefano Perego recently documented the postwar Soviet legacy of Belarus' architecture from the 1960s-80s, and has shared the photos from his 2016 cross-country drive with ArchDaily.

Cinema Oktyabr, by architect Valentin Malyshev, 1975. Minsk, Belarus. Image © Stefano Perego Housing complex "Kukuruza" (Corn), by architect Vladimir Pushkin, 1982. Minsk, Belarus. Image © Stefano Perego Pavilion of International Exhibitions "Belexpo", by architect Leonard Moskalevich, 1988. Minsk, Belarus. Image © Stefano Perego Palace of Arts, by architect Boris Semyonovich Popov, 1989. Bobruisk, Belarus. Image © Stefano Perego + 21

Vizor / STUDIO11

03:00 - 23 January, 2017
Vizor  / STUDIO11, © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov
© Dmitry Tsyrencshikov

© Dmitry Tsyrencshikov                            © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov                            © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov                            © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov                            + 25

  • Architects

  • Location

    Minsk, Belarus
  • Architect in Charge

    Maksim Vavinski, Tatiana Kashuro, Alexandr Zhmakin
  • Area

    190.8 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Vizor / Studio11

11:00 - 9 January, 2017
Vizor  / Studio11, © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov
© Dmitry Tsyrencshikov

© Dmitry Tsyrencshikov   © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov   © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov   © Dmitry Tsyrencshikov   + 23

  • Architects

  • Location

    Minsk, Belarus
  • Architects in Charge

    Maksim Vavinski, Tatiana Kashuro
  • Area

    348.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

House A / Igor Petrenko

09:00 - 13 November, 2016
House A / Igor Petrenko, © Kate Brichkovskaya
© Kate Brichkovskaya

© Kate Brichkovskaya © Kate Brichkovskaya © Kate Brichkovskaya © Kate Brichkovskaya + 24

stadiumconcept and IAA architecten Create Stadium with Tractor Valve Columns

01:00 - 31 July, 2014
Exterior View. Image © stadiumconcept with IAA architecten
Exterior View. Image © stadiumconcept with IAA architecten

Designed to seat 33,000 people, stadiumconcept and IAA architecten’s proposal for Minsk’s newest football stadium has a unique and allusive form. The column-like supports of the stadium roof resemble tractor valves, a reference to Minsk’s booming tractor fabrication industry. These tapering columns provide a signature identity for a building that, in addition to being a stadium, will serve the city as a shopping and business center.

Exterior View. Image © stadiumconcept with IAA architecten Night View. Image © stadiumconcept with IAA architecten Interior View. Image © stadiumconcept with IAA architecten Roof Plan. Image © stadiumconcept with IAA architecten + 6