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Auckland

Skyscrapers of 2018: Soaring Beyond the Archetypal Crystal Tower

07:00 - 14 December, 2018
© Viktor Sukharukov
© Viktor Sukharukov

Either as singular outcroppings or as part of a bustling center, skyscrapers are neck-craning icons across major city centers in the world. A modern trope of extreme success and wealth, the skyscraper has become an architectural symbol for vibrant urban hubs and commercial powerhouses dominating cities like New York, Dubai, and Singapore.

While skyscrapers are omnipresent, 2018 introduced new approaches, technologies, and locations to the high-rise typology. From variations in materiality to form, designs for towers have started to address aspects beyond simply efficiency and height, proposing new ways for the repetitive form to bring unique qualities to city skylines. Below, a few examples of proposals and trends from 2018 that showcase the innovative ideas at work: 

Courtesy of Plompmozes © Rafael de la-Hoz Arquitectos © Virgile Simon Bertrand Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects + 13

The Tailored Home / Lloyd Hartley Architects

17:00 - 13 November, 2018
The Tailored Home / Lloyd Hartley Architects, © David Straight
© David Straight

© David Straight © David Straight © David Straight © David Straight + 16

Herne Bay Hideaway / Lloyd Hartley Architects

21:00 - 2 November, 2018
Herne Bay Hideaway / Lloyd Hartley Architects, © David Straight
© David Straight

© David Straight © David Straight © David Straight © David Straight + 23

Waterview Connection / Warren and Mahoney

19:00 - 20 October, 2018
Waterview Connection / Warren and Mahoney, © Sam Hartnett
© Sam Hartnett

© Sam Hartnett © Sam Hartnett © Sam Hartnett © Sam Hartnett + 15

  • Architects

  • Location

    Auckland, New Zealand
  • Lead Architects

    Shannon Joe, Tom Locke
  • Other participants

    Warren and Mahoney in partnership with the Well Connected Alliance team comprising NZTA, Fletcher Construction, McConnell Dowell Constructors, Parsons Brinkerhoff NZ, Beca Infrastructure, Tonkin and Taylor, Boffa Miskell and Obayashi Corporation
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Woods Bagot and Peddle Thorp Win Auckland Skyscraper Competition

13:00 - 9 October, 2018
Woods Bagot and Peddle Thorp Win Auckland Skyscraper Competition, 65 Federal Street. Image Courtesy of Woods Bagot
65 Federal Street. Image Courtesy of Woods Bagot

Woods Bagot and Peddle Thorp have been announced as the winners of the international competition to create a new high-rise tower in central Auckland. Drawn from five finalists including Warren and Mahoney, Cox Architecture, Zaha Hadid Architects, and Elenberg Fraser, the winning design will stand 180m high. The building design is inspired by New Zealand’s natural landscape and the country’s unique geology and fauna.

65 Federal Street. Image Courtesy of Woods Bagot 65 Federal Street. Image Courtesy of Woods Bagot 65 Federal Street. Image Courtesy of Woods Bagot 65 Federal Street. Image Courtesy of Woods Bagot + 9

Mackelvie Street Retail / RTA Studio

20:00 - 19 September, 2018
Mackelvie Street Retail / RTA Studio, © Patrick Reynolds
© Patrick Reynolds

© Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds + 12

Zaha Hadid Architects, Woods Bagot, and Cox Among Finalists Announced for Auckland Tower Competition

12:00 - 6 September, 2018
Zaha Hadid Architects, Woods Bagot, and Cox Among Finalists Announced for Auckland Tower Competition, Auckland Tower. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
Auckland Tower. Image Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

The international design competition to create a new high-rise tower in central Auckland has announced five finalists. The five teams include Warren and Mahoney, Cox Architecture, Zaha Hadid Architects, Elenberg Fraser and Woods Bagot. The landmark tower competition is run by Melbourne-based property development company ICD Property. Each of the teams were asked to complete two versions of their design, one following current city Unitary Plan rules and one version that could be built given more open planning parameters.

Auckland Tower. Image Courtesy of Woods Bagot Auckland Tower. Image Courtesy of Warren and Mahoney Auckland Tower. Image Courtesy of Elenberg Fraser Auckland Tower. Image Courtesy of Cox Architecture + 6

Herne Bay Hideaway / Lloyd Hartley Architects

17:00 - 10 August, 2018
Herne Bay Hideaway / Lloyd Hartley Architects, © David Straight
© David Straight

© David Straight © David Straight © David Straight © David Straight + 23

Diocesan School for Girls Music & Drama Centre / McIldowie Partners + Upton Architects

18:00 - 31 July, 2018
Diocesan School for Girls Music & Drama Centre / McIldowie Partners + Upton Architects, © Patrick Reynolds
© Patrick Reynolds

© Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds + 32

Cliff House / Leuschke Kahn Architects

20:00 - 27 April, 2018
Cliff House / Leuschke Kahn Architects, © Sophie Leuschke
© Sophie Leuschke

© Sophie Leuschke © Sophie Leuschke © Sophie Leuschke © Sophie Leuschke + 15

University of Auckland Science Centre / Architectus

20:00 - 22 February, 2018
University of Auckland Science Centre / Architectus, © Simon Devitt
© Simon Devitt

© Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt + 35

  • Architects

  • Location

    Auckland, New Zealand
  • Lead Architects

    Patrick Clifford, Malcolm Bowes, Michael Thomson, Carsten Auer, James Mooney, Paul Millard, Alistair Scott, Michael West, Damian McKeown, Manuel Morel, Kirk Smith, Severin Soder, John Baker, Michel Bosauder, Jeremy Chapman, Rebecca Davidson, Kitty Fan, Carmen Fu (model maker), Peter Jeffs, Christian Kim, Eddy Lau, Yi Ting Lau, Joe Murphy, Warren Nicholson, John Strand, Michael Whiteacre, Mark Yong
  • Area

    22000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Bishop Selwyn Chapel / Fearon Hay Architects

21:00 - 20 November, 2017
Bishop Selwyn Chapel / Fearon Hay Architects, © Patrick Reynolds
© Patrick Reynolds

© Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds + 28

Extreme Cities: The Densest, Coldest, Remotest, Most Visited (etc) Human Settlements on Earth

09:30 - 14 November, 2017
Hong Kong <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/commpilot23/14557847230/in/photolist-obqLN3-bmhgya-f5PRvs-Ywi6Wt-Ddnv6-mwCc2-8yuA8Z-9ZD4xe-4DEWwn-USUqW-4T7iw4-bmheiZ-Ww639P-qQAyRc-5CoLwz-muzCk-qvpjcM-J1Zej-5JEzcq-aCXkva-qqKc8h-Du5DG5-acdVzo-6tZceg-66KGXt-2FEXcB-Ys6tQS-66Q1gW-EEr2ZR-EVCzQT-93zMWG-EtuFRe-4yCKbQ-VsKGNG-nvHcx-bmhaJ4-7UwsRh-eZuyr-9ZFU3w-7LmemC-4Q4W9Z-JMwVS3-bmh5dg-qeZ1p-91Z9Uc-2u9ZMu-93zNjw-9PXwCD-69YHQB-boTF69'> Khush N </a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'> CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Hong Kong Khush N licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Humans are adaptable animals; we have evolved to adjust to, and survive in, many difficult and extreme conditions. In some cases, these extremes are natural, while in other modern cities extreme living situations are created by us, and we are forced to accept and adjust. Here is a list of extreme settlement conditions: some challenging, some wonderful and all of them offering a fascinating insight into how we occupy the planet in 2017.

Tree Villa / matter

17:00 - 22 August, 2017
Tree Villa / matter, © Simon Devitt
© Simon Devitt

© Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt + 30

  • Architects

  • Location

    Auckland, New Zealand
  • Architects in Charge

    Jonathan Smith, John Holley, Phil Howat
  • Area

    300.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

The World's Most Expensive Cities in 2017 (And Why They Are So Expensive)

09:30 - 3 July, 2017
The World's Most Expensive Cities in 2017 (And Why They Are So Expensive)

As anyone who has recently attempted apartment-hunting in a major urban area will know, reasonably-priced housing can be difficult to come by for many and salaries don’t always seem to match the cost of living. This gap is contributing to housing crises in developed and developing countries worldwide. People are simply being priced out of cities, where housing has become a commodity instead of a basic human right. Financial speculation and states’ support of financial markets in a way that makes housing unaffordable has created an unsustainable global housing crisis.

Earlier this year the 13th Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey was released for 2017, revealing that the number of “severely unaffordable” major housing markets rose from 26 to 29 this year; the problem is getting worse. The study evaluates 406 metropolitan housing markets in nine of the world's major economies and uses the “median multiple” approach to determine affordability. By dividing the median house price by the median household income of an area, this method is meant to be a summary of “middle-income housing affordability.”

Hekerua Bay Residence / Archimedia

20:00 - 14 November, 2016
Hekerua Bay Residence / Archimedia, © Patrick Reynolds
© Patrick Reynolds

© Patrick Reynolds   © Patrick Reynolds   © Patrick Reynolds   © Patrick Reynolds   + 19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Auckland, New Zealand
  • Architect in Charge

    Lindsay Mackie
  • Area

    390.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014

Te Oro / Archimedia

17:00 - 5 September, 2016
Te Oro / Archimedia, © Patrick Reynolds
© Patrick Reynolds

© Patrick Reynolds © Emma Smales © Patrick Reynolds © Patrick Reynolds + 25

  • Architects

  • Location

    Glen Innes, Auckland 1072, New Zealand
  • Project Team

    Lindsay Mackie, Bernard Makoare, Martin Leung-Wai, Petelo Esekielu, David Thomas, David Fullbrook, Debbie Tikao, Karl Dawe, Russel Pinel, John Pollard
  • Area

    1485.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

Copeland Associates Architects Design New Soccer Clubhouse in Auckland

06:00 - 10 August, 2016
Copeland Associates Architects Design New Soccer Clubhouse in Auckland, Courtesy of Copeland Associates Architects
Courtesy of Copeland Associates Architects

The largest football club in New Zealand, the Three Kings United Football Club, is set to receive a new headquarter and community center at Keith Hay Park in Auckland. Designed by Copeland Associates Architects (CAA), the single storey pavilion sits on a raised plinth to elevate it from the flood plain and gives spectators a greater vantage point over the surrounding sports fields. Comprised of predominantly lightweight, prefabricated elements, the building has a sense of lightness which increases in accordance with its greater transparency at the northern end.

Courtesy of Copeland Associates Architects Courtesy of Copeland Associates Architects Courtesy of Copeland Associates Architects Copeland Associates Architects Design New Soccer Clubhouse in Auckland + 12