We are currently in Beta version and updating this search on a regular basis. We’d love to hear your feedback here.

Green Interiors Trends From Around The World

Green Interiors Trends From Around The World

There is not enough that can be said about the benefits of incorporating plants in interiors or Plantscaping. Integrating vegetation indoors serves many purposes whether practical, aesthetic or psychological. Although there are basic requirements for incorporating greenery into Homes, well thought out plant selections and placements are characteristically different across the world. By going over recent interior works, a few recurrent plantscaping design patterns arose, each reflective of distinctive climates, building styles and traditional building techniques.

While the type of the chosen plants varies depending on favorable conditions for growth and local availability, the main distinctions are related to the direct environment and display method in which the vegetation is set, as well as its intended purpose. While plants are there to offer mental wellness to some, they are essential for cooling to other or could even be meant for small scale farming.

Touches of Green. Image © Pol ViladomsVertical Greenery. Image © Minq BuiVertical Greenery. Image © Hoang LeInterior Green Courtyard. Image © Mariela Apollonio+ 33

Here are some of the plantscaping trends that were recurrent lately. Through these select examples we can note certain qualities that are common between diverse countries.

Touches of Green

Generally observed in countries across Europe, North America and some South American cities, this minimal intervention suggests the use of easy to maintain potted plants to highlight interior architectural or structural elements. Often placed in central household areas such as living rooms and kitchens these few touches of green provide comfort and visual engagement against raw material backdrops (concrete, wood and steel). 

Building Between Party Walls in Hostafrancs / estudi08014

Spain

Touches of Green. Image © Pol Viladoms
Touches of Green. Image © Pol Viladoms

Lorimer Street Townhouse / Elizabeth Roberts Architecture and Design

United States

Touches of Green. Image © Dustin Aksland
Touches of Green. Image © Dustin Aksland

Apartment AMRA7 / Piratininga Arquitetos Associados + Bruno Rossi Arquitetos

Brazil

Touches of Green. Image © Pedro Kok
Touches of Green. Image © Pedro Kok

Expansion of Apartment in Brazil Building / Alvorada Arquitetos

Brazil

Touches of Green. Image © Nelson Kon
Touches of Green. Image © Nelson Kon

Vertical Greenery

Yearlong warm temperatures and constant humidity are key when it comes to South Asian and some South American plantscaping trends. The attention to passive ventilation and natural illumination techniques (Skylights) provides an opportunity for abundant greenery to grow in enclosed houses. These plants are necessary to mitigate the indoor temperature and purify the dusty air, with the added value of providing green recreational areas for the inhabitants. Native trees and shrubs flourish in this setting extending upwards. 

Ma House / Gerira Architects

Vietnam

Vertical Greenery. Image © Hoang Le
Vertical Greenery. Image © Hoang Le

Villa City / Story Architecture

Vietnam

Vertical Greenery. Image © Minq Bui
Vertical Greenery. Image © Minq Bui

Inside Uniform House / NNA+

Vietnam

Vertical Greenery. Image © Hoang Le
Vertical Greenery. Image © Hoang Le

HALAMAN The Courtyard House / ZERO STUDIO

India

Vertical Greenery . Image © Prasanth Mohan
Vertical Greenery . Image © Prasanth Mohan

Planted Grounds

Sunken interior gardens often appear in South American and South Asian homes. They promote temperature regulation and visual stimulation at a lower eye level. They can be designed in a way to separate interior spaces, creating pathways or visual barriers between each functional area of the home.

Q04L63 House / mf+arquitetos

Brazil 

Panted Grounds. Image © Felipe Araújo
Panted Grounds. Image © Felipe Araújo

House That Rains Light / LIJO RENY architects

India

Planted Grounds. Image © Praveen Mohandas
Planted Grounds. Image © Praveen Mohandas

Prim House / Studio Locomotive

Thailand

Planted Grounds. Image © Beersingnoi
Planted Grounds. Image © Beersingnoi

The Diary House _ DA VÀNG studio

Vietnam

Interior Green Courtyard. Image © Minq Bui
Interior Green Courtyard. Image © Minq Bui

Lush Hospitality

In this case, frequently seen in North Asian countries, potted or artificially grown greenery is added in masses in cafes, restaurants, or hotel common areas. The purpose of such curated interior landscaping is to suggest an experience to the user while also providing a certain level of privacy in public areas. However, the abundant greenery must be specifically selected as it does not receive much natural light and is regularly watered. 

SHIROIYA Hotel / Sou Fujimoto Architects

Japan

Lush Hospitality . Image © Shinya Kigure
Lush Hospitality . Image © Shinya Kigure

K5 Tokyo Hotel / Claesson Koivisto Rune

Japan

Lush Hospitality . Image © Yikin Hyo
Lush Hospitality . Image © Yikin Hyo

Hotel Kiro Hiroshima / Hiroyuki Tanaka Architects

Japan

Lush Hospitality . Image © Gottingham
Lush Hospitality . Image © Gottingham

Upperhouse Namsan Exhibit Hall “Only Invited” / STRX Architects

South Korea

Lush Hospitality . Image © Jang Mi
Lush Hospitality . Image © Jang Mi

Interior Green Courtyard

Often found in European and South American homes, this semi-enclosed green buffer zone connects multiple areas of the house. This allows all surrounding rooms to have a view of the greenery and could be a recreational space as well. With limited sunlight and direct irrigation it requires some care, but could just as well be used to grow edible vegetation.  

AM House / Horma

Spain

Interior Green Courtyard. Image © Mariela Apollonio
Interior Green Courtyard. Image © Mariela Apollonio

Iturbide Studio / Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo

Mexico

Interior Green Courtyard. Image © Rafael Gamo
Interior Green Courtyard. Image © Rafael Gamo

CRL House / RAUM 4142 Architecture Office + Javier Cabanes

Spain

Interior Green Courtyard. Image © Alejandro Gómez Vives
Interior Green Courtyard. Image © Alejandro Gómez Vives

Note: Certain regions are still to be added upon availability of appropriate references. Find more projects in this My ArchDaily folder created by the author.

This article is part of the ArchDaily Topic: Green. Every month we explore a topic in-depth through articles, interviews, news, and projects. Learn more about our monthly topics. As always, at ArchDaily we welcome the contributions of our readers; if you want to submit an article or project, contact us.

Image gallery

See allShow less
About this author
Cite: Hana Abdel. "Green Interiors Trends From Around The World" 01 Mar 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/957773/green-interiors-trends-from-around-the-world> ISSN 0719-8884
Lush Hospitality . Image © Katsumasa Tanaka

纵观全球的绿色室内设计趋势

You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.