PXSTL / Freecell Architecture

Courtesy of Architecture

Architects: Freecell Architecture
Location: 3713 Washington Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA
Architect In Charge:
Area: 2400.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Freecell Architecture

Call for Proposals: PXSTL Community Program Grants

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Back in September 2013, we told you about PXSTL. Organized by the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, PXSTL challenged US artists, architects and designers to propose a small-scale intervention for a vacant lot in the St. Louis Grand Center cultural district that could possibly spark large-scale urban transformation. Freecell Architecture was announced as the winner of the competition, with their proposal “Lots”.

Today, the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts announced an open call for community program proposals that respond to “Lots”. The structure will be open from May 9 to October 5, 2014, during which several curated events will be taking place. Up to $1,500 will be granted to individuals, community groups or organizations whose proposals help in engaging the community exchange at the site. For more information regarding criteria, site, and submission guidelines, please click here.

Freecell Wins Competition to Transform St. Louis Vacant Lot into Cultural Destination

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Freecell Architecture has been announced as winner of the urban design-build competition, PXSTL. Organized by the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in , PXSTL challenged US artists, architects and designers to propose a small-scale intervention for a vacant lot in the Grand Center cultural district that could possibly spark large-scale urban transformation.

Among 60 candidates and three shortlisted finalists, Freecell’s winning proposal “Lots” was selected for its “innovative design and approach to the space as a gathering catalyst, hosting social and cultural activities to bring focus on activities of people unifying a community.” The project intends on activating audience engagement by hosting a series of concerts, dance performances, community celebrations, film screenings, and art exhibitions.

Read on for more about “Lots”…

PXSTL Competition Finalist Proposal / Freecell Architecture

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Freecell Architecture‘s proposal for the PXSTL Competition was recently announced one of the three finalists by the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University. Participants were asked to reimagine a vacant lot in ’ Grand Center cultural district while exploring the critical role arts and culture play in creating vibrant, growing communities. The competition aims to demonstrate how small-scale interventions can spur large-scale urban transformation, and Freecell’s proposal was selected for their ability to visualize Grand Center’s long-term vitality, emphasizing community engagement, interactive elements, and cross-disciplinary collaboration among St. Louis’ many cultural organizations. More images and information after the break.

St. Louis Public Library / Cannon Design

© Timothy Hursley

Architects: Cannon Design
Location: 1301 Olive Street, , MO 63103, USA
Design Principal: George Nikolajevich, FAIA
Year: 2012
Photographs: Timothy Hursley

‘Future of Cities’ Daniel Libeskind Lecture

Courtesy of Washington University in

Taking place this coming Tuesday, April 2nd at 6:30pm, Daniel Libeskind, one of the most celebrated architects working today, will be delivering the ‘Future of Cities’ lecture as part of the Assembly Series at Washington University in St. LouisHis presentation, sponsored by the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and the Architecture Student Council, is free and open to the public and will take place in Graham Chapel. Well known for his Jewish Museum in Berlin, the museum’s radical, strikingly asymmetrical design, is a true icon for the city and the country of Germany. He has received numerous awards including the 2001 Hiroshima Art Prize – an award given to an artist whose work promotes international understanding and peace, never before given to an architect. Fore more information, please visit here.

Building Pulitzer Colloquium

Courtesy of The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and Washington University in

Taking place February 8-9, the Building Pulitzer Colloquium, which is free and open to the public, will bring together key participants in the design and construction of this iconic building. The colloquium will provide unique insight into the extraordinary collaboration and dedication required to realize this project. Hosted by the The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and Washington University in St. Louis, the event focuses on how this building, designed by an internationally recognized architect, was completed. Topics will include the working structure between Tadao Ando’s office and the St. Louis-based team, the realization of Ando’s design intent through the translation of American methods of construction, and the creation of a work environment that fostered construction excellence. More information on the event after the break.

Bob Cassilly, an influential St. Louis sculptor dies at 61

Photo by Frank Peters - http://www.flickr.com/photos/fwp/

An important , scupltor lost his life this week. 61 year old artist and entrepreneur Bob Cassilly died in a construction accident on Sunday September 26th at the site of his most recent project, Cementland.

Terrace View Cafe / Studio | Durham Architects

© Steve Hall at Heidrich Blessing

Terrace View Café has a special location within downtown , ’s newest urban park, Citygarden. Studio | Durham Architects was invited into the Citygarden project to design a café building and a maintenance building on the site. The café by Studio | Durham appears equally as notable and successful as the pieces of art within the sculpture park, but distinguishes itself as a building among art.

HSSU Early Childhood & Parenting Education Center / LuchiniAD

© LuchiniAD

Architect: LuchiniAD
Location: , , United States
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: LuchiniAD

The Early Childhood & Parenting Education Center at Harris Stow State University is an architectural anomaly in this area of St. Louis, Missouri. The building, by LuchiniAD, stands out among the brick buildings with its bright white roof and sloping shape. LuchiniAD designed the graceful, contemporary building in response to another condition all too present in St. Louis and other midwestern cities, the vacant lots.  More on the building after the break.

Material Landscapes / Liane Hancock

© Melissa Kaseman

Material Landscapes is an exhibition that recently opened at the Sheldon Art Gallery in , Missouri. The show is curated by , Assistant Professor at Louisiana Tech University.  It features materiality in contemporary landscape architecture through projects by a group of national and international landscape architects.

AD Classics: Gateway Arch / Eero Saarinen

© www.flickr.com / Exothermic

Built to commemorate the westward expansion of the , the Gateway Arch designed by became a futuristic marker that rose above the cityscape of St. Louis. In its design, this monument drew from previous symbolic constructs of similar aspiration, scale and mathematical precision.

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth: An Urban History

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At a screening of The Pruitt-Igoe Myth: An Urban History in New York City, a man in front of me wondered aloud “Do you think there are more urban planners, or people here?”  The film’s crowd drew heavily from both and also attracted people with interests in social housing, modernism, racial tensions, architecture, and documentary films.  Prior to the screening, the crowd was easily divided into two groups: those with an interest in Pruitt-Igoe as a case study, and those with a personal connection to city’s triumphs and struggles.  By the end of the show, The Pruitt-Igoe Myth left every viewer knowledgable about the city’s past, as well as invested in ’ future.  More after the break.

Exhibition: “American City: St. Louis Architecture”

Jewel Box / 1936 / William C.E. Becker

The Missouri Botanical Garden presents a photographic exhibition documenting many of ’s most architecturally impressive structures. View “American City: St. Louis Architecture” on display Friday, June 10 through Sunday, Aug. 21 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily in the Garden’s Ridgway Visitor Center. The exhibit is included with Garden admission.

“American City: St. Louis Architecture” features over 70 large-scale color images by award-winner architectural photographer William Zbaren, including the iconic Linnean House conservatory and Museum Building at the Botanical Garden.

The images are from the new architectural monograph, “American City: St. Louis Architecture: Three Centuries of Classic Design,” by Zbaren and architectural writer Robert Sharoff. The book – the first new monograph on the city since the 1920s – depicts 50 of the city’s most architecturally significant structures and is available at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Garden Gate Shop.

For more information on the exhibition please click here. And check “Seven Amazing Structures You Kidn’t Know Were In St. Louis” images after the break.

AD Classics: Wainwright Building / Louis Sullivan

© University of Missouri

Among the first skyscrapers built in the world, the by and partner Dankmar Adler is regarded as an influential prototype of a modern office architecture.

The building aesthetically exemplifies the theories of Sullivan’s tall building, with the tripartite composition of base, shaft and attic, which is based on the structure of the classical column.

Cannon Design Regional Offices / Cannon Design

© Architectural Imageworks, LLC

After standing vacant for nearly 30 years, the Municipal Power House building at 1100 Clark Avenue in downtown , opened as the new offices of Cannon Design in September 2008. In 2007, the firm purchased the 19,000 sqf building and provided all design, development, and construction management services for its restoration, renovation and adaptive reuse—an investment that represents the firm’s confidence in the future of the city of St. Louis.

Architect: Cannon Design
Location: St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Project Area: 32,000 sqf
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Architectural Imageworks, LLC, Patti Gabriel Photography

Old Post Office Plaza / Baird Sampson Neuert Architects

© Debbie Franke

The winning design of an international competition, Old Post Office Plaza serves as an urban catalyst for revitalization while forming an iconic event space for downtown . Inspired by a large public sculpture, “the Torso of Icaro” by noted sculptor Igor Mitoraj and donated for installation in the project, the design creates a three dimensional armature of spaces and program that spiral upward and around the work to explore the deeper structure of ideas that the myth of Daedelus and Ikarus evokes. Not only was Daedalus the key protagonist of one of the great narratives of flight and fall, he was associated with early manifestations of public space and public art in ancient Greece, as an archetypal architect and sculptor.

Architect: Baird Sampson Neuert Architects
Location: St. Louis, , USA
Project Team: Barry Sampson (project director), Jon Neuert (project advisor), Mauro Carreno (project coordinator), Yves Bonardeaux, Winda Lau, Adrian Phiffer
Landscape Architect: ARCTURIS
Structural Engineer: Blackwell Bowick
US Structural Reps: Optimal Engineering Solutions Inc.
Civil and Electrical Engineer: EDM Incorporated
Quantity Surveyor: Vermeulens Cost Consultants
Water Feature: Water Architecture
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Sam Fentress, BSN / Zero Fractal, Debbie Franke

A Wonderful World from Washington University in St. Louis

Prototype: Conflict Resolver on the Green Line, Beirut, by Andrew Buck

In the Spring 2010 academic semester, Wiel Arets and Robert McCarter co-taught “A Wonderful World,” an advanced architectural design studio at Washington University in St. Louis. The students were asked to consider the following:

To understand the world we are living in at this moment, we have to redefine the “Map of the World,” a mental construct which at least since 1492 has undergone many reinterpretations. We could read the world anno 2020 as a collective living space for all of us, in which all the continents are in reach within 288 minutes, and the maximum travel distance at each continent will be 72 minutes, the time in which every city on each continent will be able to be reached. During the studio research, the world will be our territory, the continents are our daily living space, and the metropolitan three-dimensional city our home, surrounded by an untouched green/blue environment. The basic question we should put forward is: How will the city develop within our extremely exciting, complex, but “shrinking” world?

Washington University in St. Louis shared with us work from the studio. Follow the break for a description and drawings.

Students Featured: Andrew Buck, Shaun Dodson, Stephen Kim, Meredith Klein, Wai Yu Man, James Morgan, Aaron Plewke
Images: Courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis

We also suggest you look at how students responded to the same questions proposed by Wiel Arets at the Berlage Institute Postgraduate Research Laboratory “A Wonderful World” class.