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8 Influential Art Deco Skyscrapers by Ralph Thomas Walker

No architect played a greater role in shaping the twentieth century Manhattan skyline than Ralph Thomas Walker, winner of the 1957 AIA Centennial Gold Medal and a man once dubbed “Architect of the Century” by the New York Times. [1] But a late-career ethics scandal involving allegations of stolen contracts by a member of his firm precipitated his retreat from the architecture establishment and his descent into relative obscurity. Only recently has his prolific career been popularly reexamined, spurred by a new monograph and a high-profile exhibit of his work at the eponymous Walker Tower in New York in 2012.

One Wall Street, formerly the Irving Trust Company building, occupies one of the most valuable plots of real estate in the world. Courtesy of Wikipedia. Image  The AT&T Long Distance Building in New York, NY, contains over 1.1 million square feet of office space. Image © Wikipedia user Jim Henderson 60 Hudson Street, formerly the Western Union building, has become one of the most important internet hubs in the eastern U.S. Image © Wikipedia user Beyond my Ken The aluminum-winged crown of the Times Square Building in Rochester, New York, is an icon of Art Deco architecture. Image © Wikipedia user Marduk

A Walk Along the Bayou: An Award-Winning Proposal Aims to Reinvent Houston’s River

Nearly 9,000 kilometers separate Venice, Italy from Houston, Texas, and yet, both cities are bound by a simple connection: the coexistence of the urban fabric with the waterfront. This connection was brought to life this summer through The University of Houston’s exhibition at the Venice Architectural Biennale's Time Space Existence Event: RISKY HABIT[AT]: DYNAMIC LIVING ON THE BUFFALO BAYOU. Awarded  the Global Art Affairs Foundation (GAAF) Award for Best Exhibition, the exhibition showcased the complexities and potential of the city's relationship with its waterfront. To better understand Houston’s waterfront and the changing relationship between the city and its river we visited the site ourselves. Read after the break to see what it’s like to talk a walk along the Bayou, and to find out what the Houston river project can learn from similar undertakings in Chicago, Des Moines, and Newark.

230 Halsey Street / Richard Meier & Partners

© Steven Sze
© Steven Sze
  • Architects: Richard Meier & Partners
  • Location: Newark, NJ, USA
  • Design Principals: Richard Meier, Dukho Yeon
  • Project Manager: Vivian Lee
  • Project Architect: Remy Bertin
  • Collaborators: Scott Johnson, Chris Townsend, Dongkyu Lee, Diana Lui, Hee-Joo Shi, Jonathan Bell, Chris Layda, Adam Nicholson, Adam Greene, Hyung Sok Moon, Aki Koike, Takumi Nakagawa, Techan Abe, Aung Kyaw, Katie Kasabalis, Yuanyang Teng
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Steven Sze, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners © Steven Sze Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners © Steven Sze

Virgin Atlantic EWR Clubhouse / Slade Architecture

  • Architects: Slade Architecture
  • Location: Newark airport (EWR), 3 Brewster Road, Newark, NJ 07114, USA
  • Principals: Hayes Slade, James Slade
  • Design Team: Tian Gao, Kristina Kesler, Magda Stoenescu, David Iseri, Rasmus Kristensen, Ana Lopis, Allesandro Perinelli, Garrett Pruter
  • Client: Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd.
  • Collaborators: Virgin Atlantic In-House Design
  • MEP Engineers: ADS Engineers Ambrosino, Depinto & Schmieder
  • Structural Engineers: Gilsanz Murray Steficek LLP
  • Quantity Surveyor: PT Projects - Peter Turvey
  • Lighting Design: Focus Lighting
  • Kitchen Consultant: Next Step Design
  • Contractor: Shawmut Design and Construction
  • Millwork: Allegheny Millwork
  • Area: 500.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Anton Stark, Courtesy of Slade Architecture

Courtesy of Slade Architecture © Anton Stark © Anton Stark © Anton Stark

NJIT Spring 2013 Lecture Series

The Spring 2013 Lecture Series at the College of Architecture and Design (CoAD) at NJIT (New Jersey Institute of Technology) began this month with Kathryn Dean’s talk and will conclude on April 18th. This semester, the series, which is free and open to the public, will feature Jonathan Massey, Nataly Gattegno + Jason Johnson, Tony & Margaret Santos, Ken Greenberg, Alan Organschi, and Axel Schmitzberger as keynote speakers. The concluding event is an AIA-endowed lecture by Will Bruder, which is also a part of the annual Design Showcase event. As part of the series, on March 6, CoAD will host a Spring Symposium on “Distributed Intelligence” sponsored by AIANJ.  Lectures are Mondays at 5:30pm in Weston Lecture Hall unless otherwise noted. For more information, please visit here.

AIAS Northeast Fall Quad Conference

© Vicky Tran
© Vicky Tran

With ‘Revitalizing Cities’ as the theme, New Jersey Institute of Technology will be hosting the upcoming semi-annual AIAS Northeast Fall Quad Conference in Newark. As current architecture students, they have an invested interest in what the world will become in 5, 10, even 20 years from now. It is our mission to showcase the potential of urban environments, like Newark, and look forward to a progressive future.

NJIT College of Architecture and Design 2012 Spring Lecture Series

Courtesy of NJIT College of Architecture and Design
Courtesy of NJIT College of Architecture and Design

The spring 2012 lecture series at the College of Architecture and Design (CoAD) at NJIT started on February 13 with Kiel Moe’s “Matter is But Captured Energy.” All lectures take place on Mondays at 5:30 in Weston Lecture Hall unless otherwise noted, and are free and open to public. The series will conclude with a talk by Preston Scott Cohen on April 19th. More information on the lecture series after the break.

Update: Teachers Village / Richard Meier & Partners Architects

© Richard Meier and Partners
© Richard Meier and Partners

Newark-native Richard Meier has not forgotten his roots.  Established by the Puritans as a colony to follow the rules of the church in the 17th century, Newark evolved into a prosperous industrial center during the 19th century, experienced a harsh period of industrial and social  decline after WWII, and is currently seeking to reestablish its reputation as a renewed urban metropolis.  Meier has supported such efforts to restore the city’s vitality, including chairing an international design competition for the creation of a Visitors’ Center for Newark (check out some proposals we’ve previously featured here).  Back in 2010, Meier & Partners shared their vision for a new Teachers Village for the city – a four block-long mixed-use development aimed at attracting young professionals who work in the educational system to reside in the downtown area.  This past week, we are happy to share that the Village, which includes two school buildings with three charter schools and a daycare center, 70,000 sqf for retail space, in addition to the rental apartments for Newark teachers, has broken ground.

More about the project after the break.

Newark Visitors Center ORIGA[MIX] / Influx_Studio


INFLUX_STUDIO shared with us their new project for Newark’s Visitors Center. See more images and architect’s description after the break.