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ODA’s 71 White Street in Brooklyn Incorporates the Site's Graffitied Walls Into the Design

08:00 - 28 December, 2015
ODA’s 71 White Street in Brooklyn Incorporates the Site's Graffitied Walls Into the Design, Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of ODA New York
Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of ODA New York

Bushwick, now famed for its art, night life and abundance of green spaces, is one of the fastest gentrifying neighbourhoods in Brooklyn. ODA New York's 71 White Street will be the latest in new developments taking over former industrial buildings in the neighborhood -- but with a twist. Using the foundation of a former 1930s manufacturing building, 71 White will preserve its graffitied brick exterior, maintaining the character of the neighbourhood. Read more about the project after the break.

Images Released of Forward Slash ( / ) ARCHITEKTUR's Performa 15 Hub in NYC

16:00 - 19 December, 2015
Images Released of Forward Slash ( / ) ARCHITEKTUR's Performa 15 Hub in NYC, Courtesy of Performa
Courtesy of Performa

Images have been released of Forward Slash ( / ) ARCHITEKTUR’s Performa 15 Hub, which served as the headquarters for New York-based Performa’s 2015 Biennial, an event dedicated to live performances across artistic disciplines. The Hub offered a venue for performances, screenings, panel discussions and seminars; and a lounge, shop and visitor information centre. View more images of the venue after the break.

Courtesy of Performa Courtesy of Performa Courtesy of Performa Courtesy of Performa +11

Mount Sinai Hess Center for Science and Medicine / SOM

13:00 - 13 December, 2015
Mount Sinai Hess Center for Science and Medicine / SOM, © Eduard Hueber | archphoto
© Eduard Hueber | archphoto
  • Architects

  • Location

    1470 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029, USA
  • Area

    422769.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

© Eduard Hueber | archphoto © Eduard Hueber | archphoto © Eduard Hueber | archphoto © Eduard Hueber | archphoto +10

New LEGO® Collection Lets You Recreate Skylines

12:00 - 11 December, 2015
New York City. Image © LEGO®
New York City. Image © LEGO®

Venice, Berlin and New York City are the first to be featured in LEGO®'s new Architecture Skyline Collection. Unlike its single-building series, these new kits will allow you to recreate famous skylines by constructing up to 5 of each city's most iconic buildings. 

New York City's skyline will be represented by the One World Trade Center, Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, Statue of Liberty, and Flatiron Building. Venice will feature the Rialto Bridge, St. Mark’s Basilica, St. Mark’s Campanile, St. Theodore and the Winged Lion of St. Mark, and the Bridge of Sighs. And Berlin's skyline will include the Reichstag, Victory Column, Deutsche Bahn Tower, Berlin TV Tower, and Brandenburg Gate.

Heatherwick and Diamond Schmitt to Reimagine Lincoln Center's Largest Concert Hall

11:30 - 11 December, 2015
Heatherwick and Diamond Schmitt to Reimagine Lincoln Center's Largest Concert Hall, David Geffen Hall. Image © WPPilot licensed under CC BY 4.0
David Geffen Hall. Image © WPPilot licensed under CC BY 4.0

Heatherwick Studio and Diamond Schmitt Architects have been chosen to collaborate on the "renovation and reimagination" of David Geffen Hall, Lincoln Center’s largest concert hall in New York City. The team, chosen through a two-year competition and over 100 firms, will design a 21st-century concert hall for the New York Philharmonic home and transform it into a center capable of hosting "a broader, ongoing array of community activities and events."

"The inspiring combination of Heatherwick and Diamond Schmitt will bring contemporary design excellence, respect for the historic architecture of the hall, and extensive experience creating acoustically superb performance halls," said Katherine Farley, chairman of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

2016 AIANY Design Awards

14:25 - 10 December, 2015
2016 AIANY Design Awards

AIA New York’s annual Design Awards Program recognizes outstanding architectural design by AIA New York Chapter members, New York City based architects in any location, and work in New York City by architects around the globe. The purpose of the awards program is to honor the architects, clients, and consultants who work together to achieve design excellence.

Shokan House / Jay Bargmann

10:00 - 9 December, 2015
Shokan House / Jay Bargmann, © Brad Feinknopf
© Brad Feinknopf

© Brad Feinknopf © Brad Feinknopf © Brad Feinknopf © Brad Feinknopf +58

2016 YAP P.S.1 Shortlist

11:55 - 2 December, 2015
2016 YAP P.S.1 Shortlist, COSMO - 2015 winner of MoMA PS1's YAP. Image © Office for Political Innovation
COSMO - 2015 winner of MoMA PS1's YAP. Image © Office for Political Innovation

MoMA P.S.1 has announced five finalists to compete in the 2016 Young Architects Program (YAP). Now in it’s 16th edition, the competition will challenge a group of emerging architects to design a temporary installation within the walls of the P.S.1 courtyard for MoMA’s annual summer “Warm-Up” series.

The 2016 shortlist includes First Office / Andrew Atwood + Anna Neimark (Los Angeles, CA); ESCOBEDO + SOLIZ / Lazbent Pavel Escobedo Amaral + Andres Soliz Paz (Mexico City, Mexico); ULTRAMODERNE / Yasmin Vobis + Aaron Forrest (Providence, RI); COBALT OFFICE / Andrew Colopy and Robert Booth (Houston, TX); and Frida Escobedo (Anzures, Mexico). The winners will be announced in early 2016. 

Previous winners include COSMO (Andrés Jaque), The Living (Hy-Fi), CODA (Party Wall), Interboro Partners (Holding Pattern), Work AC (Public Farm 1), MOS (Afterparty) and SO-IL (Pole Dance).

The New New York Skyline (Sunlight Not Included)

14:00 - 30 November, 2015
The New New York Skyline (Sunlight Not Included), The full diagram available on the National Geographic (link below). Image © National Geographic
The full diagram available on the National Geographic (link below). Image © National Geographic

With New York's skyline on the rise, Fast Company says that there will no longer be sunlight on the streets of Manhattan by 2020 (unless you can afford a rooftop penthouse). Thirty-four skyscrapers 700-feet and taller are currently in-progress or being proposed, adding to 41 that already exist. This may seem like a lot, but as Fast Company also points out London has 230 new towers over 20 stories planned. See National Geographic's "The New New York Skyline" illustration for a closer look. 

Writing Pavilion / Architensions

11:00 - 27 November, 2015
Writing Pavilion / Architensions, © Cameron Blaylock
© Cameron Blaylock
  • Architects

  • Location

    Brooklyn, NY 11222, USA
  • Architects in Charge

    Alessandro Orsini, Nick Roseboro
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock +20

SOFTLab’s “Nova” Transforms Flatiron Public Plaza for the Holiday Season

08:00 - 25 November, 2015
SOFTLab’s “Nova” Transforms Flatiron Public Plaza for the Holiday Season, Courtesy of Van Alen Institute
Courtesy of Van Alen Institute

The Flatiron Public Plaza has unveiled its centerpiece for this year’s “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer” – SOFTLab’s Nova, the winner of a closed-competition hosted by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) and Van Alen Institute. The project will become the center of the neighbourhood’s festivities for the holiday season, as well as “a highly visible landmark” in the heart of New York

Courtesy of Van Alen Institute Courtesy of Van Alen Institute Courtesy of 3M Courtesy of Van Alen Institute +16

BIG High Line Project Unveiled

12:15 - 23 November, 2015
BIG High Line Project Unveiled , © BIG, via New York Yimby
© BIG, via New York Yimby

New York Yimby has unveiled BIG's latest New York skyscraper: 76 11th Avenue. Planned for one of the largest plots along the High Line, the nearly 800,000-square-foot proposed project is comprised of two towers perched on a podium of retail, gallery and hotel space in the city's Meatpacking district. Rising 302-feet to the east and 402-feet to the west, the towers are divided by a "diagonal cut" through the site that opens up more views for residents to the High Line.

David Chipperfield Reveals His First Residential Project in New York

12:40 - 20 November, 2015
David Chipperfield Reveals His First Residential Project in New York, © Miller Hare
© Miller Hare

Details on David Chipperfield's first large-scale residential project in New York has been revealed. The last development to take place at Bryant Park, The Bryant condominium tower will feature 57 one to four bedroom residences, including two triplex penthouses, on a boutique hotel at 16 West 40th Street. The HFZ Capital Group development was designed with Chipperfield's "intelligent simplicity," as the architects describe. Each residence will occupy a corner of the tower.

REX to Design World Trade Center Performing Arts Building in New York

11:41 - 20 November, 2015
REX to Design World Trade Center Performing Arts Building in New York, WTC site. Image © James Ewing OTTO
WTC site. Image © James Ewing OTTO

A commission that was originally set to be Frank Gehry's, Brooklyn-based REX has been selected to design The Performing Arts Center at New York's World Trade Center site - PACWTC. REX was chosen over finalists Henning Larsen Architects and UNStudio through a "rigorous invitational process" that focused on the practices' experience with similar projects, including REX's Dee and Chales Wyly Theater in Dallas, Seattle Public Library and Vakko Fashion Center in Istanbul.

"Throughout the architectural selection process, REX presented us with an inspired vision. Joshua [Prince-Ramus] totally blew us away with his innovative ideas about how to present cutting-edge culture, but also about how to make the PAC relate to everyone who comes to the WTC site," said PACWTC director and president Maggie Boepple.  

ODA's Manhattan Tower Offers Residents a Slice of Suburbia in the Sky

14:30 - 16 November, 2015
ODA's Manhattan Tower Offers Residents a Slice of Suburbia in the Sky, © Moso Studio
© Moso Studio

Inspired by the recent trend for super-skinny, super-tall skyscrapers currently dominating the Manhattan luxury residential market, ODA New York has developed a design for 303 East 44th Street which they describe as "a new urban reality" for the city. By taking a prototypical, modestly-sized tower building and stretching it skyward, the firm has inserted sculptural skygardens in the voids opened up between the floors to create a tower that combines the advantages of urban living with the spatial benefits of the suburban home.

© Moso Studio © Moso Studio © Moso Studio © Moso Studio +17

New Images Released of Foster + Partners' Seagram-Adjacent Condos in New York

14:00 - 11 November, 2015
New Images Released of Foster + Partners' Seagram-Adjacent Condos in New York, © DBOX
© DBOX

RFR and Foster + Partners have released new images of One Hundred East 53rd Street, a 63-story luxury residential tower in New York next to Mies van der Rohe's famed Seagram Building. The skyscraper, which was announced last year, will contain 94 residences, a swimming pool, wellness facility, spa, library and sitting rooms, and its trademark Foster minimalism is intended to "provide a counterpoint to the Seagram’s bronze edifice," according to the developers RFR.

© DBOX © DBOX © DBOX © DBOX +7

Brooklyn’s First Supertall Skyscraper to be Designed by SHoP

11:18 - 9 November, 2015
Brooklyn’s First Supertall Skyscraper to be Designed by SHoP, The proposed "340 Flatbush" Avenue tower. Image © SHoP Architects; H/T New York Yimby
The proposed "340 Flatbush" Avenue tower. Image © SHoP Architects; H/T New York Yimby

The first image of what will be Brooklyn's tallest building has been unveiled. Designed by SHoP Architects, the 1000-foot-tall skyscraper will boast a 12:1 ratio, as New York Yimby reports, making it one of New York's skinniest towers - despite being double the width of the practice's 111 West 57th Street project

"340 Flatbush," as it's known, is being developed by JDS. Upon its (tentative) completion in early 2019, the building will offer 466,000-square-feet of residential space, forming 550 units, and 140,000-square feet of commercial space. 

Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

09:30 - 9 November, 2015
Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

In the mid-1980s, after literature had long been held hostage by postmodernist irony and cynicism, a new wave of authors called for an end to negativity, promoting a "new sincerity" for fiction. Gaining momentum into the 1990s, the movement reached a pinnacle in 1993 when, in his essay E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction, pop-culture seer David Foster Wallace, a proponent of this "new sincerity," made the following call to action: “The next real literary ‘rebels’ in this country might well emerge as some weird bunch of anti-rebels, born oglers who dare somehow to back away from ironic watching, who have the childish gall actually to endorse and instantiate single-entendre principles... These anti-rebels would be outdated, of course, before they even started. Dead on the page. Too sincere. Clearly repressed. Backward, quaint, naive, anachronistic. Maybe that’ll be the point. Maybe that’s why they’ll be the next real rebels. Real rebels, as far as I can see, risk disapproval. The old postmodern insurgents risked the gasp and squeal: shock, disgust, outrage, censorship, accusations of socialism, anarchism, nihilism. Today’s risks are different. The new rebels might be artists willing to risk the yawn, the rolled eyes, the cool smile, the nudged ribs, the parody of gifted ironists, the ‘Oh how banal.'"

Architecture, ever in debt to the styles and ideas of other art forms, could learn a thing or two now from the resuscitation of American fiction at the turn of the millennium. It too is enduring an identity crisis, mired by pessimism and uncertainty - a reality made painfully clear this past January when a New York Times Op-Ed by Steven Bingler and Martin C. Pedersen, How to Rebuild Architecture, divided camps and made the design world fume. In the editorial, the authors spoke vehemently of an architectural profession that has become mired by egos and been disconnected from public needs. Things quickly got ugly, critics wrestled with critics and subsequently the public got involved. What no one seemed to take into account is that this type of hounding is at the core of the problem. In its current landscape the discipline has struggled with its past, been deferential to its present, and wrestled with the uncertainty of its future. In a moment when we have become addicted to despondency, can anyone win?