Columbia GSAPP Showcase Award-Winning Student Portfolios on Instagram

04:00 - 16 November, 2015

Earlier this year the Graduate School of Architecture, Preservation and Planning (GSAPP) at New York City's Columbia University took to Instagram to showcase a collection of their "award-winning" student portfolios across a week of posts. Nineteen stop-motion films highlight the highly individual nature of the architectural portfolio, demonstrating a wide range of graphic styles and methods of book-binding. From hardback-bound theses to gold foil embossing and 'box-in-box' constructions, you can get a taste of some of what the school considers its finest work from 2015 graduates, after the break.

Watch Gregg Pasquarelli and Vishaan Chakrabarti Describe their Ideal New York

12:00 - 14 November, 2015

In this new video by WIRED, Gregg Pasquarelli of SHoP Architects and Vishaan Chakrabarti of Partnership for Architecture and Urbanism discuss the biggest changes that they would make to New York City. Covering everything from public green space to transit infrastructure, the two speak at length on the Big Apple’s planning and how it compares to other massive metropolitan cities around the world. Major changes they suggest include the separation of Central Park into two large strips, for example “West Side” and “East Side” Park, with industrial areas on the outside edge and residential/commercial areas located between them.

New Images Released of Foster + Partners' Seagram-Adjacent Condos in New York

14:00 - 11 November, 2015
New Images Released of Foster + Partners' Seagram-Adjacent Condos in New York, © DBOX
© DBOX

RFR and Foster + Partners have released new images of One Hundred East 53rd Street, a 63-story luxury residential tower in New York next to Mies van der Rohe's famed Seagram Building. The skyscraper, which was announced last year, will contain 94 residences, a swimming pool, wellness facility, spa, library and sitting rooms, and its trademark Foster minimalism is intended to "provide a counterpoint to the Seagram’s bronze edifice," according to the developers RFR.

© DBOX © DBOX © DBOX © DBOX +7

Leaking Water Becomes Latest Setback for the World Trade Center Hub

12:00 - 8 November, 2015
Leaking Water Becomes Latest Setback for the World Trade Center Hub, © Joe Woolhead
© Joe Woolhead

Adding to the controversy surrounding its construction, Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Hub - set to be the world’s most expensive transit hub with a now-estimated budget of $3.7 billion - has delayed its opening until the first half of 2016 due to leaking water, according to an article in The New York Times. The water, originating from the site of an office tower to-be at 3 World Trade Center has been traced back to workers constantly spraying water to handle dust while breaking up concrete, exposing the construction site of 3 World Trade Center to the elements. Though the centerpiece of the Hub, The Oculus, has nearly finished construction, several retail spaces of the Westfield World Trade Center luxury shopping centre have been affected by the leaking and the Westfield Corporation has decided to postpone the move-in of all stores until the problem has been fully addressed. Despite the problems, the Westfield Corporation remains optimistic of the final result that the Oculus will produce and are working aggressively to remedy the leaking.

SOFTlab Wins Second Annual Flatiron Competition in New York

14:06 - 30 October, 2015
SOFTlab Wins Second Annual Flatiron Competition in New York, © SOFTlab
© SOFTlab

SOFTlab has been chosen as the second annual winner of the Flatiron Public Plaza design competition in New York. Their winning proposal, Nova will open to the public next month on Wednesday, November 18th. Its "crystalline" structure aims to intrigue the passer-by, welcoming them inside for framed views of the Flatiron Building and surrounding landmarks, including the Met Life Tower and Empire State Building

Design Trust and Farming Concrete Release World’s First Public Urban Agriculture Database

08:00 - 30 October, 2015
Design Trust and Farming Concrete Release World’s First Public Urban Agriculture Database, Hells Kitchen Farm Project, Hell's Kitchen, Manhatttan. Image © Rob Stephenson for the Design Trust for Public Space
Hells Kitchen Farm Project, Hell's Kitchen, Manhatttan. Image © Rob Stephenson for the Design Trust for Public Space

The Design Trust for Public Space and Farming Concrete have released the Farming Concrete Data Collection Toolkit: the first public platform for gathering, tracking and understanding urban agriculture production and the benefits of community gardens, urban farms and school gardens. The result of a six-year initiative, Five Borough Farm, the Toolkit features a user-friendly manual with simple methods of generating and collecting data at each garden and farm, with accompanying instructional videos; Barn, an online portal for farmers and gardeners to input and track their production; and Mill, a public database providing access to numbers, reports for practitioners, researchers, policymakers, funders and anyone with interest in urban agriculture.

Watch nArchitects’ My Micro New York Near Completion

08:00 - 27 October, 2015

nArchitects have released a trailer featuring the development of their “My Micro NY” proposal, which won the adAPT NYC competition in 2013. The competition was conceived as a way of addressing the need for 1-2 person apartments in New York City (see the winning scheme and finalists here). My Micro NY, which re-negotiates minimum size requirements for New York apartments, consists of a series of modular apartment units, that when constructed together, will form the tallest modular building in the city. Watch the video to see the building being erected, and stay tuned for the full feature to be released upon completion of the building. 

Sneak Peek at the World's First Underground Park - The Lowline

16:00 - 23 October, 2015

A 1,200 square-meter "test lab" of what aims to be the world's first underground park has opened its doors to New Yorkers. View a sneak peek above, shared with ArchDaily by The Spaces, to see just how the Lowline (as the project's known) plans to "plumb" sunlight into an abandoned trolley terminal beneath the city's Delancey Street in an attempt to transform the forgotten space into a sun-lit, subterranean public garden. 

This Proposed Pedestrian Bridge Lets You Walk Between Manhattan and New Jersey

08:00 - 14 October, 2015
This Proposed Pedestrian Bridge Lets You Walk Between Manhattan and New Jersey, Courtesy of Jeff Jordan Architects, via http://libertybridgeorg.wix.com/libertybridge
Courtesy of Jeff Jordan Architects, via http://libertybridgeorg.wix.com/libertybridge

Despite being separated by only a few miles, Manhattan and Jersey City seem much further apart; the Hudson River forces commuters to take long, roundabout routes or rely on the over-worked PATH system. Inspired by a need for connectivity between the two cities, Kevin Shane began conceptualizing a new pedestrian bridge, dubbed Liberty Bridge, which would connect Jersey City to Battery Park. Read more about this conceptual proposal after the break.

Zaha Hadid Releases New Image of New York Condominium Project Near High Line

12:30 - 1 October, 2015
Zaha Hadid Releases New Image of New York Condominium Project Near High Line, © Hayes Davidson
© Hayes Davidson

Just as the luxury condominium high rise opens for sales, Zaha Hadid Architects and Related Companies have released a new image of 520 West 28th - Zaha Hadid's first residential building in New York. Planned for a prime location in West Chelsea, alongside the High Line and nearby Renzo Piano's newly-opened Whitney Museum and Diller Scofidio + Renfro's future Culture Shed, the 11-story development is offering 39 distinct residences, some reaching up to 6,391-square-feet. 

“I’ve always been fascinated by the High Line and its possibilities for the city. Decades ago, I used to visit the galleries in the area and consider how to build along the route. It's very exciting to be building there now,” said Zaha Hadid. “The design engages with the city while concepts of fluid spatial flow create a dynamic new living environment.”

Competition Challenges Architects to Reimagine New York's MetLife Building

16:00 - 22 September, 2015
Competition Challenges Architects to Reimagine New York's MetLife Building, © Wikipedia User: Shaqspeare, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
© Wikipedia User: Shaqspeare, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Metals in Construction magazine has launched a competition for architects, engineers, students, designers, and others from all over the world to submit their vision for recladding 200 Park Avenue, built a half-century ago as the world’s largest corporate structure, the Pan Am Building (now the MetLife Building).

The mandate is to reimagine this New York City icon with a resource-conserving, eco-friendly enclosure—one that creates a highly efficient envelope with the lightness and transparency sought by today’s office workforce while preserving and enhancing the aesthetic of its heritage. Entrants may now register on the competition's official website. The deadline for final submission is February 1, 2016.

Salt-Shaped Salt Shed Takes Shape Along Hudson River in New York City

08:00 - 21 September, 2015
Salt-Shaped Salt Shed Takes Shape Along Hudson River in New York City, via Field Condition
via Field Condition

New York City is replacing one of its 40 salt sheds on the Gansevoort Peninsula with a new, origami-like structure by Dattner Architects at Canal St/West St, along the Hudson River. Once completed, the shed will rise almost 70 feet tall and hold over 4,000 tons of salt in its six-foot thick concrete walls. In response to the complaints leveled against the Sanitation Garage across Spring Street from the new salt shed, Dattner Architects deliberately created a monolithic, crystalline form to contrast the scrim-like façade of its neighbour.

Images Released of Moshe Safdie's First New York Project

12:18 - 17 September, 2015
Images Released of Moshe Safdie's First New York Project, © Safdie Architects
© Safdie Architects

Images of Moshe Safdie's first New York project has been released. Planned to rise on a Manhattan site at West 30th Street, between Broadway and 5th Avenue, the 64-story mixed-use tower will feature a limestone base that compliments and serves its historic neighbor: the Marble Collegiate Church, one of the Collegiate Churches’ five ministries.

The building "will be distinguished by its vertical massing, which breaks down the scale of the tower into a series of three-story-high, offset projections," says Safdie Architects. "The offset projections also provide energy efficiency by self-shading the tower’s facade, further enhanced by additional sun shading at the south facade."

Monocle 24 Examines Bilateral Inspiration Between Cities Across the World

04:00 - 14 September, 2015
Monocle 24 Examines Bilateral Inspiration Between Cities Across the World, New York City. Image © Harold Navarro
New York City. Image © Harold Navarro

For the latest episode of The UrbanistMonocle 24's weekly "guide to making better cities," the team explore the role of bilateral inspiration between metropolises across the world. Examples of cities relying on one another to draw lessons from and progress can be seen across the world: from the ways in which London and New York City tackle similar urban problems, to how a bike-sharing scheme in Paris has proven to be contagious. The show also visits Vienna, where its Imperial heritage is being imitated the world over, and the show ponders whether the fact that every continent "claiming to have its own Venice" is actually a good thing?

Jan Gehl: "Civic Culture Needs Cultivating and Curating"

16:35 - 11 September, 2015
Jan Gehl: "Civic Culture Needs Cultivating and Curating", © Flickr CC User MK Feeney
© Flickr CC User MK Feeney

Danish architect and urban planning expert Jan Gehl has weighed in on New York Mayor Bill de Blasio's threat to remove Times Square as a"kneejerk reaction" to aggressive panhandling. Recounting beloved square's evolution, Gehl argues that public spaces need more than just to exist: "Civic culture needs cultivating and curating... Public spaces like Times Square are the great equalizer in cities: Improvements in the public realm benefit everyone. The city should view the challenge of Times Square’s pedestrian plaza not as a reason for retreat, but as a call to create a diverse, dense, intense experience of public life that we can all enjoy." Read Gehl's remarks, here.

AR Issues: Why American Cities Should Give Big Jobs to the Little Guys

09:30 - 10 September, 2015
AR Issues: Why American Cities Should Give Big Jobs to the Little Guys, Courtesy of The Architectural Review
Courtesy of The Architectural Review

ArchDaily is continuing our partnership with The Architectural Review, bringing you short introductions to the themes of the magazine’s monthly editions. In this introduction to the August 2015 issue, AR editor Christine Murray takes on the disheartening architectural scene in North American cities from New York to Toronto, arguing that "NYC is not where we found a new American architecture" and asking: "Why not give the young guns a tower or a Whitney, let them stretch their legs?"

The latest New York towers are more billboard than building. Like celebrity-endorsed perfume - fancy box, smelly water - the architecture matters less than the artist and his (yes, they are all men) pen’s effluent black-ink concept scrawl.

This is the nation that gave birth to the skyscraper, yet tycoons are commissioning foreign architects for its next generation of towers. New York’s recent acquisitions include a Siza and an Ando, to display alongside a collection of Nouvel, Viñoly and Gehry. Michael Sorkin takes on the towers in this edition, accusing starchitects of putting lipstick on pigs.

Exhibition Opening: Sea Level: Five Boroughs at Water's Edge

07:00 - 9 September, 2015
 Exhibition Opening: Sea Level: Five Boroughs at Water's Edge, Sea Level: Five Boroughs at Water's Edge
Sea Level: Five Boroughs at Water's Edge

Please join us for the exhibition opening of Sea Level: Five Boroughs at Water's Edge, and a conversation with author and curator Robert Sullivan, and photographer Elizabeth Felicella. The two will engage in a wide-ranging discussion on the collaborative panorama exploring the past and future of New York City's expansive waterfront.

Symposium: Extreme Heat: Hot Cities - Adapting to a Hotter World

06:00 - 8 September, 2015
Symposium: Extreme Heat: Hot Cities - Adapting to a Hotter World, This day-long sym­po­sium, the first of its kind, will cover top­ics rang­ing from urban cli­ma­tol­ogy to build­ing mate­ri­als, with case stud­ies and rec­om­men­da­tions for the future.
This day-long sym­po­sium, the first of its kind, will cover top­ics rang­ing from urban cli­ma­tol­ogy to build­ing mate­ri­als, with case stud­ies and rec­om­men­da­tions for the future.

“Extreme Heat: Hot Cities – Adapting to a Hotter World” is a unique, day-long symposium. A broad constituency involved in building and urban design, science, research, policy, innovation, mitigation, and adaptation will come together to discuss how to address this growing risk through planning, design, and construction.

“Extreme Heat” invites architects and landscape architects, planners, engineers, and allied professionals, government, foundations, scientists, researchers, and students – in fact, all interested stakeholders – to discuss essential information and insights. The symposium will cover topics ranging from urban climatology to building materials, case studies, and recommendations for the future. It will revisit prior extreme heat events such as the 1995 Chicago and 2003 Paris category-defining heat waves, and what has changed since then.