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ELEMENTAL's "Half-Finished" Housing Typology: A Success in All Circumstances

Since they first developed the typology for their Quinta Monroy project in Iquique, Chile, the "half-finished home" has become something of a signature for ELEMENTAL: they have used the technique in multiple cities in Chile, as well as their Monterrey Housing project in Mexico. The typology began life as a way of dealing with extremely low budgets, allowing governments to provide housing to citizens at incredibly low prices, but nevertheless creating homes that would provide for the needs of residents and even gain value over time. Now, they have applied the theory to their Villa Verde Housing project, published just last week on ArchDaily.

Read more about the typology, and how it has been applied at Villa Verde, after the break...

Michael Ong Wins 2013 SOYA Award

Qantas has selected Michael Ong as the winner of the 2013 Spirit of Youth Awards 365 (SOYA 365) for architecture and interior design, awarding him $5,000 in cash, $5,000 in Qantas flights, and a rare 12-month mentorship with leading architect and founding partner of Tonkin Zulaikha Greer, Brian Zulaikha. Ong, a Melbourne-based architect, founded MODO (Michael Ong Design Office) in 2011, and was chosen for the prize due to his work on the project Hans House. Check out more about the story here.

Poolhouse / OOK Architecten

© Harro Rijneke
© Harro Rijneke
  • Architects: OOK Architecten
  • Location: Amersfoort, The Netherlands
  • Design Team: Robin van Rossum, Martin Timmerman, Harro Rijneke
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Harro Rijneke

© Harro Rijneke © Harro Rijneke © Harro Rijneke © Harro Rijneke

Shirasu Residence / ARAY Architecture

  • Architects: ARAY Architecture
  • Location: Kagoshima, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan
  • Architect in Charge: Asei Suzuki
  • Area: 143.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Piano Takes on Kahn at Kimbell Museum Expansion

For architects, Louis Kahn's Kimbell Museum has long been hallowed ground. For Renzo Piano, who designed the museum's first major expansion, it was also an enormous difficulty to overcome. His addition to the museum could be neither too close to Kahn's building, nor too far. It had to solve a parking problem, yet respect Kahn's distaste for cars. It had to respond to Kahn's stately progression of spaces—and that silvery natural light that make architects' knees go wobbly. And yet it could not merely borrow from Kahn's revolutionary bag of tricks. 

VUC Syd / AART Architects + ZENI Architects

© Adam Moerk © Adam Moerk © Adam Moerk © Adam Moerk

Haus von Arx / Haberstroh Schneider

© FG+SG - architectural photography © FG+SG - architectural photography © FG+SG - architectural photography © FG+SG - architectural photography

The Indicator: Kickstarting Architecture's Virtual Future

And secrets they must be because Kemp’s little company, Digital Physical, has kept under the radar, housed away in some nondescript loft space in Los Angeles. What Mr. Kemp and his bearded acolytes have developed is something so simple, so obvious, and yet utterly revolutionary. It’s one of those inventions that all architects are soon going to realize they need - and clients will soon start to expect. 

Robert Miles Kemp is going to be one of 2014’s Innovators of the Year. Mark my words. If I worked for Autodesk, I’d be calling him up right about now - or at the very least trying to steal his secrets.

The “it” is Spacemaker VR, architecture’s first virtual reality system made for designers. Yes, you have to wear a VR headset, but you won’t care if you look like a dork because you (and your big clients) will be blown away by the fact that you’re looking, flying around a 3D model of a future-space - all while being firmly in the present. 

UNStudio Selected to Design Baumkirchen Mitte Tower in Munich

UNStudio has been announced as winner of a competition to design a 60-meter residential and office tower in Munich. Planned to be the “focal point” of the Baumkirchen Mitte development, the project will feature 13,000 square meters of “neutral” office space that promotes “flexibility” and “creativity” as well as 5,500 square meters of contemporary apartment units that each share a strong, private connection with the surrounding landscape.  

Read on for the architect’s description...

Albert Camus Multimedia Library / de-so

  • Architects: de-so
  • Location: Avenue du Maréchal Juin, 91000 Évry, France
  • Architect in Charge: Olivier Souquet, François Defrain
  • Collaborators: Youngsong Park, Matthieu Janand, P. Reynes
  • Structural Engineering: OTE Ingénierie
  • Mechanical/Plumbing/ Electrical Engineering: OTE
  • Graphic Design: Atelier 59
  • Area: 2710.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Hervé Abbadie

© Hervé Abbadie © Hervé Abbadie © Hervé Abbadie © Hervé Abbadie

Jaime Garcia Terres Library / arquitectura 911sc

  • Architects: arquitectura 911sc
  • Location: Ciudad de Mexico, D.F., Mexico
  • Project Leaders: Jose Castillo + Saidee Springall
  • Design Team: Ricardo García Santander
  • Structure: Izquierdo Ing. Y Asociados
  • Installation: DIIN Ing. Gustavo Nieto
  • Lighting: Artenluz Arq. Javier Ten
  • Artistic collaboration: Perla Krauze
  • Builder: Sackbe
  • Museography: Margen Rojo
  • Area: 170.0 sqm
  • Photographs: Moritz Bernoully, Jaime Navarro

© Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Moritz Bernoully

Rectory and Church Hall / Michael Meier Marius Hug Architekten

  • Architects: Michael Meier Marius Hug Architekten
  • Location: Klosters, Switzerland
  • Collaborators: Brigitte Jermann, Stephania Zgraggen, Daniel Hässig, Martin Weber, Stefan Nothnagel
  • Area: 3030.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2008
  • Photographs: Roman Keller

© Roman Keller © Roman Keller © Roman Keller © Roman Keller

Zensala / IDIN Architects

  • Architects: IDIN Architects
  • Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
  • Design Team: Jeravej Hongsakul, Eakgaluk Sirijariyawat, Rubporn Sookatup
  • Area: 1400.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Spaceshift Studio

© Spaceshift Studio © Spaceshift Studio © Spaceshift Studio © Spaceshift Studio

Tunnel Monitoring Complex Hausmannstaetten / Dietger Wissounig Architekten

© Jasmin Schuller © Jasmin Schuller © Jasmin Schuller © Jasmin Schuller

M House / Facet Studio

Courtesy of Facet Studio
Courtesy of Facet Studio
  • Architects: Facet Studio
  • Location: Niigata, Niigata Prefecture, Japan
  • Design Team: Yoshihito Kashiwagi, Olivia Shih
  • Area: 188.0 sqm
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Facet Studio

Courtesy of Facet Studio Courtesy of Facet Studio Courtesy of Facet Studio Courtesy of Facet Studio

Museum Round Up: The Box is Back

Clyfford Still Museum. Image ©  Jeremy Bittermann
Clyfford Still Museum. Image © Jeremy Bittermann

In a recent article for the Denver Post, Ray Rinaldi discusses how the box is making a comeback in U.S. museum design. Stating how architecture in the 2000’s was a lot about swoops, curves, and flying birds - see Frank Gehry and Santiago Calatrava - he points out the cool cubes of David Chipperfield and Renzo Piano. We've rounded up some of these boxy works just for you: the Clyfford Still Museum, the Kimbell Art Museum Expansion, The St. Louis Art Museum's East Building, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien's Barnes Foundation, and Shigeru Ban's Aspen Art Museum. Each project begins to show how boxes can be strong, secure, and even sly. Check out more about the article here

Leura Lane / Cooper Scaife Architects

© John Wilson © John Wilson © John Wilson © John Wilson