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Competitions

School in Vilaflor / TECHNE

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
School in Vilaflor  / TECHNE, Courtesy of TECHNE
Courtesy of TECHNE

Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE +24

  • Architects

  • Location

    38613 Vilaflor, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
  • Architect in Charge

    José Manuel Rodríguez Peña
  • Engineer

    Nelson Hernández Dorta
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photography

    Courtesy of TECHNE

LLAMA / KILO + BIG

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
LLAMA /  KILO  + BIG, Courtesy of BIG
Courtesy of BIG

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG +15

  • Architects

  • Location

    Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Architects in Charge

    Lars Larsen (KILO), Jakob Lange (BIG)
  • Project Year

    2014

New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?, BIG's 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
BIG's 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

For small firms, design competitions can often feel like a Catch22 - enter and lose precious time and resources (usually for nothing) or avoid them - at the risk of losing out on the "big break." Now a new class at Harvard's Graduate School of Design takes on just this quandary, as well as the many other practical, theoretical, and moral implications of architectural competitions for the profession. Learn more at this article at the Harvard Gazette.

Terminal da Lapa / Núcleo de Arquitetura

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
© Nelson Kon
© Nelson Kon
  • Architects

  • Location

    Rua Guaicurus - Água Branca, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Architect in Charge

    Luciano Margotto, Marcelo Ursini, Sérgio Salles
  • Area

    7015.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2003
  • Photographs

© Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon +24

Unified Architectural Theory: Chapter 5

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
Unified Architectural Theory: Chapter 5, Dessau Bauhaus / Walter Gropius. "We read with alarm about Bauhaus images and practices introduced into the architectural education of developing countries. The press announces these as “progressive” moves, little realizing what danger that poses to that country’s tradition". Image © Thomas Lewandovski
Dessau Bauhaus / Walter Gropius. "We read with alarm about Bauhaus images and practices introduced into the architectural education of developing countries. The press announces these as “progressive” moves, little realizing what danger that poses to that country’s tradition". Image © Thomas Lewandovski

We will be publishing Nikos Salingaros’ book, Unified Architectural Theory, in a series of installments, making it digitally, freely available for students and architects around the world. The following chapter discusses our society’s phobia against natural, local forms - our “ecophobia” - and the need for the architecture discipline to counter this fear by adopting a more scientifically-rigorous, intellectual structure. If you missed them, make sure to read the previous installments here.

The 21st century has begun with a continuation, and perhaps intensification, of the worst prejudices seen in the twentieth. Those prejudices include a disdain of traditional cultures, and all that links a human being to his/her local history. 

Similarly, most building and planning today follow unwritten rules that have no empirical foundation, being based strictly upon visual/ideological constructs from the early twentieth century. Contemporary design avoids any criterion of quality that draws upon evolved precedent and tradition from a prior era, and thinks that this refusal is a great virtue. In this way, architects and urbanists end up obeying simplistic criteria for design, rejecting any sense of beauty that links human beings with their land, tradition, and culture. 

The term “ecophobia” refers to an unreasonable but deeply conditioned reaction against natural forms. It has also been used in clinical psychology to denote a phobia against one’s dwelling, but that specific use now appears to be antiquated. However, we believe that these two terms “ecophobia” and “oikophobia” may in many cases be used interchangeably. (Linguistically, the common Greek root for “house” can be written either as ecos or oikos). 

Le Clos Y / Dai Sugasawa

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
Le Clos Y / Dai Sugasawa, © Antoine DUHAMEL
© Antoine DUHAMEL

© Antoine DUHAMEL © Antoine DUHAMEL © Antoine DUHAMEL © Antoine DUHAMEL +15

  • Interior Designers

  • Location

    27 Avenue du Maine, 75015 Paris, France
  • Project Chief

    Simon Gasquet
  • Architects Chief

    Pierre Millet
  • General Construction

    Adriano de Sousa (CREADS)
  • Area

    100.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014

Bamboo: A Viable Alternative to Steel Reinforcement?

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
Bamboo: A Viable Alternative to Steel Reinforcement?, bamboo reinforcement. Image © Professorship of Architecture and Con- struction Dirk E. Hebel, ETH 3) Zürich / FCL Singapore
bamboo reinforcement. Image © Professorship of Architecture and Con- struction Dirk E. Hebel, ETH 3) Zürich / FCL Singapore

Developing countries have the highest demand for steel-reinforced concrete, but often do not have the means to produce the steel to meet that demand.  Rather than put themselves at the mercy of a global market dominated by developed countries, Singapore’s Future Cities Laboratory suggests an alternative to this manufactured rarity: bamboo.  Abundant, sustainable, and extremely resilient, bamboo has potential in the future to become an ideal replacement in places where steel cannot easily be produced.

Renewal ‘Stedelijk Museum Hof van Busleyden’ / dmvA architecten + Hlc.r architect

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
Renewal ‘Stedelijk Museum Hof van Busleyden’  / dmvA architecten  +  Hlc.r architect, © Frederik Vercruysse
© Frederik Vercruysse

© Frederik Vercruysse © Frederik Vercruysse © Frederik Vercruysse © Frederik Vercruysse +10

Timescanners: Digital Scanners Explain Historic Architecture's Engineering Mysteries

00:00 - 7 June, 2014

Thanks to state of the art mobile laser scanners, scientists can now document the greatest architecture in history, from The Pyramids to St. Paul's Cathedral, as digital models with pinpoint accuracy. The digital representations take you inside, around and through the buildings, which means researchers can study and analyze sites without being in the field. The technology is already proving its worth - watch the trailer above to see how Petra was constructed and more!

A House for the Future Inspired by Alice in Wonderland

00:00 - 7 June, 2014
A House for the Future Inspired by Alice in Wonderland, The space is filled with inventive details, including a 100-year-old stoneware tub (above) and a wall of 573 tools for the kitchen-cum-workshop (below). Image Courtesy of Constantin Meyer/Koelnmess
The space is filled with inventive details, including a 100-year-old stoneware tub (above) and a wall of 573 tools for the kitchen-cum-workshop (below). Image Courtesy of Constantin Meyer/Koelnmess

If you could design the ideal house of the future, what would it look like? Given the opportunity to answer this question, interior and product designer Louise Campbell turned to an unlikely source – Alice in Wonderland. To learn how the fairytale influenced the design, check out the following article, originally published as Through the Looking Glass on Metropolis Magazine.

Every year, the imm Cologne furniture fair hosts Das Haus, a life-size model of an ideal future house. In the past, architects and product designers—such as Zaha Hadid and Naoto Fukasawa in 2007— have teamed up to design their dream house, without pesky constraints like clients or budget. This year, Louise Campbell wore both hats. An interior and product designer, Campbell created what looked like a machine for communal living (or maybe the dwelling of a well-heeled Scandinavian commune).

KHT House / I.R.A.

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
KHT House / I.R.A., © Nobuaki Nakagawa
© Nobuaki Nakagawa

© Nobuaki Nakagawa © Nobuaki Nakagawa © Nobuaki Nakagawa © Nobuaki Nakagawa +42

  • Architects

  • Location

    Kahoku, Nishimurayama District, Yamagata, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    International Royal Architecture
  • Design Team

    Akinori Kasegai , Daisuke Tsunakawa
  • Structure design

    KAP
  • Area

    197.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

Lightweight Concrete Structure Wins Competition for New Gramalote Market Plaza

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
Lightweight Concrete Structure Wins Competition for New Gramalote Market Plaza, Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto
Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto

In 2010, the town of Gramalote in Colombia was destroyed by a catastrophic mudslide, triggered by heavy rainfall and a series of small earthquakes. Now the town is being rebuilt from scratch in a new location, and the government has introduced architectural competitions for the town's major public buildings, including a high school, sports center, a cultural center, a public market, an elderly home and a farmer center.

Architects Rodrigo Chain and Jheny Nieto have shared their winning design for the New Gramalote Market Plaza with us, a structure of 15 concrete modules that occupies a steeply sloping site. Read on after the break for more on the design.

Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto +6

Venice Biennale 2014 Winners: Korea, Chile, Russia, France, Canada

00:00 - 7 June, 2014
Venice Biennale 2014 Winners: Korea, Chile, Russia, France, Canada, © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

The awards ceremony for the 14th  International Architecture Exhibition have just wrapped and the results are in! 

Rem Koolhaas, the director of the Biennale, Paolo Baratta, president of the Biennale, and the jury presented the awards for Lifetime Achievement and International Participations. The jury recognized that the Biennale was a tremendous opportunity to produce and share knowledge about modernity -- especially praising its role in uncovering and dissecting new areas of influence in the architecture world. 

Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula © Andrea Avezzù, Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia. Image
Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula © Andrea Avezzù, Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia. Image

The Golden Lion for Best National Participation went to Korea for "Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula" The jury cited Korea's "extraordinary achievement of presenting a new and rich body of knowledge of architecture and urbanism in a highly charged political situation."

Chile received the Silver Lion for a National Participation for "Monolith Controversies". The jury said, "Focusing on one essential element of modern architecture - a prefabricated concrete wall- it critically highlights the role of elements of architecture in different ideological and political contexts." 

The Silver Lion for best research project in the Monditalia section went to Andrés Jaque/Office for Political Innovation for "Sales Oddity. Milano 2 and the Politics of Direct-to-home TV Urbanism."

L’Orange de Ris / Edouard Francois

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
L’Orange de Ris / Edouard Francois, © Paul Raftery
© Paul Raftery

© Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery +23

  • Architects

  • Location

    Chemin de Montlhéry, 91130 Ris-Orangis, France
  • Design Team

    Maison Edouard François, CET Ingénierie (BET TCE)
  • Area

    4350.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

How Safe Are Glass Skyscrapers Really?

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
How Safe Are Glass Skyscrapers Really?, The Willis Tower's Glass Balcony. Image Courtesy of Jared Newman, DesignCrave.com
The Willis Tower's Glass Balcony. Image Courtesy of Jared Newman, DesignCrave.com

Imagine standing on a glass platform with Chicago 1300 feet directly below. Suddenly, the glass holding you begins to crack. This actually happened to Alejandro Garibay at the Willis Tower (formerly the Sears Tower) just last week. Luckily, Garibay wasn't hurt, but the occurrence begs the question: how safe is glass - the most common material used in skyscrapers nowadays - really? Karrie Jacobs At Fast Company - Design, asked materials experts to find out "The Truth Behind Building With Glass."  

Wing Wall House / Camp Design Inc + Sumosaga Fudosan

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
Wing Wall House / Camp Design Inc + Sumosaga Fudosan, © Masumi Kawamura
© Masumi Kawamura

© Masumi Kawamura © Masumi Kawamura © Masumi Kawamura © Masumi Kawamura +11

Redchurch Loft Apartment / Studio Verve Architects

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
Redchurch Loft Apartment / Studio Verve Architects, © Luke White
© Luke White

© Luke White © Luke White © Luke White © Luke White +15

Dae Student Building / Arkylab + Mauricio Ruiz

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
Dae Student Building / Arkylab + Mauricio Ruiz, © Oscar Hernández
© Oscar Hernández

© Ana Rangel © Oscar Hernández © Ana Rangel © Oscar Hernández +33

  • Architects

  • Location

    Avenida Eugenio Garza Sada, Barranquilla, Aguascalientes, Mexico
  • Architect in Charge

    Luis Morán (Arkylab) y Mauricio Ruiz
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photography

    Oscar Hernández, Ana Rangel