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What Will Be Mandela’s Spatial Legacy?

Rendering for Greenpoint Stadium. Image Courtesy of http://bensnewgreenpointstadium.webs.com/
Rendering for Greenpoint Stadium. Image Courtesy of http://bensnewgreenpointstadium.webs.com/

 From the window of an airplane it's all too plain that apartheid has been deeply written into the South African landscape. Even the smallest town appears as two distinct towns. One features a spacious grid of tree-lined streets and comfortable houses surrounded by lawns. The other, its shriveled twin, some distance away but connected by a well-traveled road, consists of a much tighter grid of dirt roads lined with shacks. Trees are a rarity, lawns non-existent. This doubling pattern appears no matter the size of the population: here, the white town; over there, the black township. -- Lisa Findley, “Red & Gold: A Tale of Two Apartheid Museums.”

There are few systems of government that relied so heavily upon the delineations of space than the Apartheid government of South Africa (1948-1994). Aggressively wielding theories of Modernism and racial superiority, South Africa’s urban planners didn’t just enforce Apartheid, they embedded it into every city - making it a daily, degrading experience for South Africa’s marginalized citizens.

When Nelson Mandela and his party, the African National Congress, were democratically elected to power in 1994, they recognized that one of the most important ways of diminishing Apartheid’s legacy would be spatial: to integrate the white towns and the black townships, and revive those “shriveled twin[s].” 

As we remember Mandela - undoubtedly the most important man in South Africa’s history - and ponder his legacy, we must also consider his spatial legacy. It is in the physical, spatial dimensions of South Africa’s towns and cities that we can truly see Apartheid’s endurance, and consider: to what extent have Mandela’s words of reconciliation and righteous integration, truly been given form?

Albizia House / Metropole Architects

  • Architects: Metropole Architects
  • Location: Simbithi Eco Estate, South Africa
  • Design Architect: Nigel Tarboton
  • Project Architect: Tyrone Reardon
  • Project Technician: Chris Laird
  • Area: 1000.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Grant Pitcher

© Grant Pitcher © Grant Pitcher © Grant Pitcher © Grant Pitcher

PLAYscapes Competition Results Announced

"People tend to forget that play is serious." - David Hockney

PLAYscapes, an international design competition launched earlier this year asking people to "submit a plan or proposal to turn a neglected forgotten part of your city into a playscape," has announced their winning entries. Set up by Building Trust International, the competition called for "professional and student architects and designers from cities around the world to propose ideas which encouraged public interaction and turned redundant city spaces into fun creative places."

Find out more about the winning professional entry from the City of Cape Town, entitled Cape Town Gardens Skatepark, along with the winning student entry from the Lusiada University of Lisbon, entitled Bring a Pal and Have Fun, after the break...

Melkbos / SAOTA - Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects

Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA

Mamelodi POD / Architecture for a Change

© Architecture for a Change (PTY)LTD
© Architecture for a Change (PTY)LTD
  • Architects: Architecture for a Change
  • Location: Mamelodi, Pretoria, South Africa
  • Architects in Charge: Anton Bouwer, Dirk Coetser, John Saaiman
  • Collaborators: Youth Zones (Supporting Organization)
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Architecture for a Change (PTY)LTD

© Architecture for a Change (PTY)LTD © Architecture for a Change (PTY)LTD © Architecture for a Change (PTY)LTD © Architecture for a Change (PTY)LTD

A Glimpse of Hope for Johannesburg's Forgotten Ponte Tower

The Ponte Tower is a residential high-rise in Johannesburg, South Africa with a unique history and now a promising future. It was designed by architect Manfred Hermer in the 1970's to be one of the most desirable places to live in the city, with an iconic, hollowed out interior, three-story apartments and rooftop jacuzzis. Over time, however, the building fell into disrepair and instead of serving as an icon of extreme wealth and prosperity, it became an icon of poverty and indifference. In still racially-divided South Africa, this was marked by the moving out of whites and the moving in of a primarily black population as property values plummeted. It has been associated with high levels of crime, a lack of sanitariness and even suicides, thanks to the building's hollow core.

Head Road 1815 / SAOTA

Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA

Human.Kind Advertising / PPS Architects

  • Architects: PPS Architects
  • Location: 259 Jan Smuts Ave, Dunkeld, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Lizl Sheridan

© Lizl Sheridan © Lizl Sheridan © Lizl Sheridan © Lizl Sheridan

Cove 6 / SAOTA – Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects

Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA

St Leon 10 / SAOTA – Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects

  • Architects: SAOTA – Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects
  • Location: Bantry Bay, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Architects in Charge: Stefan Antoni & Philip Olmesdahl
  • Interior Design: Antoni Associates - Mark Rielly
  • Project Year: 2008
  • Photographs: Courtesy of SAOTA

Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA

Podium at Menlyn / Boogertman + Partners Architects

© Michael Schmucker
© Michael Schmucker

© Michael Schmucker © Michael Schmucker © Michael Schmucker © Michael Schmucker

Clifton View 7 / Antoni Associates

  • Architects: Antoni Associates
  • Location: Clifton, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Interior Architecture: Mark Rielly
  • Interior Decor: Adam Court
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Adam Letch

© Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch

POD / Greg Wright Architects

© Kate Del Fante Scott
© Kate Del Fante Scott

© Kate Del Fante Scott © Kate Del Fante Scott © Kate Del Fante Scott © Kate Del Fante Scott

House Mosi / Nico van der Meulen Architects

Courtesy of Nico van der Meulen Architects Courtesy of Nico van der Meulen Architects Courtesy of Nico van der Meulen Architects Courtesy of Nico van der Meulen Architects

Plett 6541+2 / SAOTA

  • Architects: Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects
  • Location: The Robberg, Plettenberg Bay, Garden Route, South Africa
  • Design Team: Stefan Antoni, Philip Olmesdahl, Bobby Hugill
  • Interior Design: Daniela Priebatsch, Emi Cavalieri
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Courtesy of SAOTA

Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA Courtesy of SAOTA

House Ber / Nico van der Meulen Architects

© Barend Roberts © Barend Roberts © Victoria Pilcher © Victoria Pilcher