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Mexican Architecture

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Latest projects in Mexico

Latest news in Mexico

The Ambitious Project that Brings Together 44 Mexican and International Architects

06:00 - 19 September, 2017
The Ambitious Project that Brings Together 44 Mexican and International Architects, © Adlai Pulido
© Adlai Pulido

In Baja California, Mexico, the 860 hectares that make up 'Cuatro Cuatros'—a tourism development that for the past ten years has been overseen and designed by Mauricio Rocha and Gabriela Carrillo of Taller de Arquitectura—present an arid and mostly monochromatic landscape interrupted only by stones and bushland.

10 Teams Selected as Winners of Hyperloop One Global Challenge

14:30 - 15 September, 2017
10 Teams Selected as Winners of Hyperloop One Global Challenge, Screenshot via Mexloop
Screenshot via Mexloop

Hyperloop One has announced the 10 winners of its Hyperloop One Global Challenge, which sought to identify the most impactful potential Hyperloop routes across the globe. From hundreds of applicants, 10 systems located in 5 different countries were selected by a panel of experts from fields of infrastructure, technology and transportation as the strongest.

Mauricio Rocha and Gabriela Carrillo: “It is Important Not to Doubt That Architecture is Art”

09:30 - 13 September, 2017
Mauricio Rocha and Gabriela Carrillo: “It is Important Not to Doubt That Architecture is Art”, Estudio Iturbide, Coyoacán, México City, 2016-2017. Image Courtesy of Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo
Estudio Iturbide, Coyoacán, México City, 2016-2017. Image Courtesy of Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo

In August I moderated a round table at UNAM in Mexico City in which I posed a provocative question: is architecture art? The participants, architects Mauricio Rocha, Gabriela Carrillo, and Victor Legorreta argued that despite architecture’s limitations, it is architects’ attempts to overcome them that makes it art. Meanwhile Gabriel de la Mora, an artist trained as an architect, drew a line, separating the two disciplines: “Art is art and architecture is architecture,” he insisted. Yet both sides were not quite satisfied with their initial assertions and the discussion continued, opening up to many interesting positions that pulled and pushed the interlocutors closer together and further apart with every attempt to give an explanation. I loved the discussion and I hoped we would not reach any definitive answers; the last thing we need in architecture is a consensus. It is our insistence on questioning that leads to new visions and unique solutions.

25-Story, Trellised, Mixed Use Development to Improve Pedestrian Access in Downtown Monterrey

06:00 - 24 August, 2017
25-Story, Trellised, Mixed Use Development to Improve Pedestrian Access in Downtown Monterrey, Courtesy of Miró Rivera Architects and Ibarra Aragón Arquitectura
Courtesy of Miró Rivera Architects and Ibarra Aragón Arquitectura

An important step in providing pedestrian access along downtown Monterrey’s main transportation routes, Torre Citica is a 25-storey mixed-use development designed by Austin-based Miró Rivera Architects and Mexican firm Ibarra Aragón Arquitectura (IAARQ) in Monterrey, Mexico. The project is the first of its kind situated over Venustiano Carranza, a significant thoroughfare that links Monterrey with the neighboring municipality of San Pedro Garza García.

The Best Photos of Mexican Architecture, Taken by Our Readers

12:45 - 22 August, 2017
The Best Photos of Mexican Architecture, Taken by Our Readers

This month marks the 5th anniversary of the establishment of ArchDaily Mexico, one of our fastest-growing country-specific sites dedicated to reporting and analyzing the latest in architectural news and projects coming out of the world's largest Spanish-speaking country.

CEMEX Announces 2017 Mexican Premio Obras Finalists

10:30 - 11 August, 2017
CEMEX Announces  2017 Mexican Premio Obras Finalists

Held annually, the CEMEX Building Award honors the best architecture and construction both in Mexico and abroad. Yesterday the cement company announced the finalist projects located in Mexico, and in categories ranging from social housing to infrastructure. Each project will be evaluated by a jury convened by CEMEX; the qualities to be evaluated include integrated sustainability, architectural design, structure and innovation in the construction process. 

Alberto Kalach: “Imagine if All Rooftops in Our City Were Green!”

09:30 - 11 August, 2017
Alberto Kalach: “Imagine if All Rooftops in Our City Were Green!”, Reforma 27. Image © Yoshihiro Koitani
Reforma 27. Image © Yoshihiro Koitani

Last month I went on an enlightening trip to Mexico City, during which I had a chance to meet with half a dozen leading Mexican architects and critics. Those meetings included insightful conversations with Miquel Adrià, Tatiana Bilbao, Victor Legorreta, Mauricio Rocha, and Michel Rojkind among others (many of which will also feature in future installments of City of Ideas). I asked them many different questions, but two were consistent: “who would you name as Mexico’s best architect at this moment?” and “what one building built in the capital over the last decade is your favorite?” All of my interviewees pointed to Alberto Kalach (born 1960) and his Vasconcelos Library (2007). My Conversation with Kalach took place the next day after visiting the library on the rooftop of another one of his iconic buildings, Tower 41 overlooking Bosque de Chapultepec, Mexico City’s Central Park. We spoke about books, libraries, and his idea of buildings as inventions.

A Success Story of Architecture and Art in One of Mexico's Most Violent Cities

09:30 - 26 July, 2017
A Success Story of Architecture and Art in One of Mexico's Most Violent Cities, Cortesía de Jardín Botánico de Culiacán
Cortesía de Jardín Botánico de Culiacán

What becomes of public space once violence is normalized in a city? Though it is naive to believe that architecture by itself can present absolute solutions to complex social and political issues, it is also important to explore and understand its possibilities as an agent of social change, however small.

When Architecture and Tourism Meet: La Grande Motte's Pyramids by the Seaside

09:30 - 21 July, 2017
When Architecture and Tourism Meet: La Grande Motte's Pyramids by the Seaside, © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ville-architecturale-de-la-Grande-Motte.JPG'>Wikimedia user Jjoulie</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
© Wikimedia user Jjoulie licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Given a chance to realize the architect’s dream of creating his own utopian city from a blank slate, French architect Jean Balladur was inspired by lost civilizations of the past. His designs recall the architecture of grand Mayan ruins with some added flair from the 1960s, all in the form of a seaside resort village in southern France, La Grande Motte. Balladur devoted nearly 30 years to his life’s work, which today welcomes over 2 million tourists annually.

FR-EE's Museo Soumaya Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

04:00 - 20 July, 2017
FR-EE's Museo Soumaya Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Museo Soumaya, which opened to the public in 2011, is one of the more striking cultural landmarks on the skyline of Mexico City. Designed by FR-EE / Fernando Romero Enterprise, the space accommodates and displays a private art collection of nearly 70,000 works spanning the 15th to the mid-20th Centuries, including the world’s largest private collection of Auguste Rodin sculptures. In this photo-essay, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to this – a rotated rhomboid clad in a skin of 16,000 hexagonal mirrored-steel panels.

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