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Patrick Kunkel

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Spotlight: Geoffrey Bawa

07:00 - 23 July, 2017
A courtyard in Bawa's campus for the University of Ruhuna. Image © Harry Sowden
A courtyard in Bawa's campus for the University of Ruhuna. Image © Harry Sowden

Despite his late entry into architecture, Geoffrey Manning Bawa FRIBA, (July 23, 1919 – May 27, 2003), explored modernism and its cultural implications and created a unique, recognizable style of design which had a lasting impact on architects across the world. Well versed in Modernist theory, Bawa was one of the original proponents of Tropical Modernism, a design movement in which sensitivity for local context combines with the form-making principles of modernism. Bawa’s architecture led to the formation of a new architectural identity and aesthetic for many tropical environments, and won him recognition and awards, including the Chairman’s Award of the Aga Kahn Special Chairman’s Award for Architecture (2001) and the title Deshamanya, in recognition of his contributions to his country by the government of Sri Lanka.

Kandalama Hotel, Dambulla. Image © Harry Sowden Ena de Silva House. Image ©  Helene Binet The Sri Lanka Parliament Building. Image © Harry Sowden The Bentota Beach Hotel. Image © Harry Sowden + 15

Spotlight: Michael Graves

14:00 - 9 July, 2017
Portland Building (1982). Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Portland_Building_1982.jpg'>Wikimedia user Steve Morgan</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Portland Building (1982). Image © Wikimedia user Steve Morgan licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

As a firm believer in the importance of making good design accessible to the public, Michael Graves (July 9, 1934 – March 12, 2015) produced an enormous body of work that included product design alongside his architecture. Graves brought Postmodernism to the public eye through his emphasis on ornament and aesthetics, and stood firmly behind his design philosophy even as it went out of vogue.

Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi

04:00 - 21 June, 2017
Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi, Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ihavegotthestyle/221174130'>Flickr user ihavegotthestyle</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Palazzetto dello sport. Image © Flickr user ihavegotthestyle licensed under CC BY 2.0

Known as both an architect and an engineer, Pier Luigi Nervi (June 21, 1891 – January 9, 1979) explored the limitations of reinforced concrete by creating a variety of inventive structural projects; in the process, he helped to show the material had a place in architecture movements of the coming years. Nervi began his career in a time of technological revolution, and through his ambition and ability to recognize opportunity in the midst of challenge, he was able to have an impact on several disciplines and cultures.

Spotlight: Emilio Ambasz

08:00 - 13 June, 2016
Spotlight: Emilio Ambasz, Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © Flickr user kentamabuchi licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © Flickr user kentamabuchi licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

As early as the 1970s, Emilio Ambasz (born 13 June 1943) initiated a discussion on sustainability through his work with green spaces and buildings which is arguably more important today than ever, and contributed to theoretical and design discourse outside of architecture through his wide variety of interest and career pursuits. Ambasz’s work has crossed several disciplines; he has been a curator, a professor, an industrial designer, and an architect, and is highly regarded in all of these varied pursuits.

Ingrid Böck's "Six Canonical Projects by Rem Koolhaas" Dissects the Ideas that have Made Koolhaas' Career

08:30 - 28 July, 2015
Seattle Central Library. Image © Ramon Prat
Seattle Central Library. Image © Ramon Prat

First published in May, Six Canonical Projects by Rem Koolhaas by Ingrid Böck reveals the logic behind Koolhaas’ projects and the ideas and themes running through his career. Incredibly thorough in her analysis, Böck aims to correct what she views as an absence of complete studies on an architect who has had an enormous influence on the theory and practice of architecture. Böck presents these six projects, which include Koolhaas’ thesis project “Exodus, or the Voluntary Prisoners of Architecture,” Ville Nouvelle Melun-Sénart, Maison Bordeaux, the Dutch Embassy in Berlin, the Seattle Central Library, and the CCTV Headquarters, because they most directly explore six concepts prominent throughout Koolhaas’ work: Wall, Void, Montage, Trajectory, Infrastructure, and Shape.

Gramazio Kohler's Robotic Arm Creates an Elegant Twisting Brick Facade

14:00 - 22 July, 2015

Advances in computers and fabrication technology have allowed architects to create fantastic designs with relative ease that in years past would likely require the labor of countless master craftsmen. Architecture firms like Gramazio Kohler Architects are known for their innovative approach to digital fabrication, adapting technology from a variety of fields. To create this stunning new brick façade for Keller AG Ziegeleien, Gramazio Kohler used an innovative robotic manufacturing process called “ROBmade,” which uses a robot to position and glue the bricks together. 

Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler + 15

See How Much New York Has Changed Since the 1990s

09:30 - 21 July, 2015
See How Much New York Has Changed Since the 1990s, © G.Alessandrini
© G.Alessandrini

Grégoire Alessandrini’s blog “New York City 1990’s” contains an enormous collection of images taken between 1991 and 1998 that artfully depict New York. The website is a snapshot of New York in the 1990s, capturing the spirit of the era with photographs of New York’s architecture that could only exist at that time. As politics and public sentiment have changed, the city has changed with it, and much of the New York Alessandrini captured no longer exists. 

To document just how much New York has changed in the past 25 years, we have curated a selection of Alessandrini’s images and set each photograph next to a Google Street View window corresponding to the photographer’s location at the time. In the photographs where Alessandrini observes from an elevated vantage point, the Street View images are as close as possible to the photographer’s location.  

Read on after the break to see the images of New York’s dynamic change from the 1990s to 2015. 

FAKT Creates a Floating Metal “Cloudscape” in Montpellier

08:00 - 16 July, 2015
FAKT Creates a Floating Metal “Cloudscape” in Montpellier, Photograph of the Cloudscape's Front Elevation. Image © Giulio Boem
Photograph of the Cloudscape's Front Elevation. Image © Giulio Boem

FAKT, an up-and-coming studio based out of Berlin and Zurich, has created an architectural installation for the Festival des Architectures Vives, which uses perforated aluminum sheets to produce a cloudscape. Sponsored by metalworking companies Karl Dieringer and AMAG Austria Metall, the exhibition explores aluminum's material properties and its ability to create new forms.

Cloudscape Surface Contours. Image © Giulio Boem An Interior View of the Exhibition. Image © Giulio Boem Visitors Looking inside Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem Top of Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem + 9

NCARB's 2015 Report Projects Positive Future for the Architecture Profession

08:00 - 15 July, 2015
NCARB's 2015 Report Projects Positive Future for the Architecture Profession, Screenshot Taken from NCARB Report
Screenshot Taken from NCARB Report

The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has released “NCARB by the Numbers,” their annual report featuring statistics important to the architecture profession in the US. NCARB’s research portrays a positive future for the profession, with statistics showing that diversity is growing, architects are becoming licensed at an earlier age and progressing through licensure paths more quickly than in previous years, and more architects are becoming licensed than ever before.

The 2015 report covers the causes and effects of the results, looking into the impact of location and education. A section entitled “Jurisdictions by the Numbers,” lays out standardized relevant information for viewers to investigate conditions in the architecture profession in each state. The report also includes an analysis of the role of NAAB-accredited programs in helping architects achieve licensure.

Learn more on the information in NCARB’s report after the break.

Architecture Gear Giveaway: Win the new 32” Samsung UD970 Monitor

10:30 - 14 July, 2015
Architecture Gear Giveaway: Win the new 32” Samsung UD970 Monitor

The success of a design, from inception to construction, can depend on the extent to which designers can represent their intentions, but the days when architects used the drafting pencil and parallel edge to exercise physical control over their work are rapidly fading away. While computerization makes possible innovative forms and new methods of working, if not calibrated and engineered perfectly, digital technology can bring unintended consequences into the design process. Samsung’s UD970 monitor, however, resynchronizes the design process with the build environment through ultra-high definition (UHD) technology. Samsung partnered with leading designers, including Mark English Architects, to explore the importance of high-resolution detail in their work and ArchDaily has teamed up to bring these UHD monitors to our readers. To learn more, read on after the break.

Design With Company + Arup Create “Shaw Town” Theatre in Chicago

16:00 - 11 July, 2015
Design With Company + Arup Create “Shaw Town” Theatre in Chicago , Courtesy of Design With Company
Courtesy of Design With Company

Chicago based architecture studio Design With Company, in collaboration with Arup, have constructed their winning proposal for the Ragdale Ring design competition, which asked entrants to redesign Howard Van Doren Shaw’s 1912 performance venue for a Chicago artists’ community. Their design lightheartedly references features of Shaw’s architecture, while creating a venue for acoustically unamplified performances.

Courtesy of Robert Becker/Design With Company Courtesy of Allison Derr/Design With Company Courtesy of Robert Becker/Design With Company Courtesy of Allison Derr/Design With Company + 24

The Top 10 Most Impactful Skylines

09:30 - 8 July, 2015
The Top 10 Most Impactful Skylines, Hong Kong Skyline. Image © Flickr CC user Brian H.Y
Hong Kong Skyline. Image © Flickr CC user Brian H.Y

Emporis, a German company that collects and distributes information on construction and the built environment, has released a ranking of the world’s 100 most visually impactful skylines, using statistical analysis to address a topic often made frustratingly subjective by civic pride. 

To create the rankings, Emporis used data from its archives to determine the number of high-rise buildings in the cities it studied, and applied a points system that gave each building a numerical value determined by the number of floors it has. To standardize their ranking process, the points system ignores spires and other ornament, and does not include television or antenna towers, masts, bridges, or similar architecture. 

Of the top 10 most impactful skylines, seven are in Asia, while North and South America combined have the other three. Notably, cities filled with rich architectural history fail to make the list, or fall surprisingly low in the rankings; London is number 44, Paris is ranked 66, and Rome does not make the cut. 

To see the top ten skylines, read on after the break, and click here to see Emporis' complete list.

“City of Light”: The Story of Willem Dudok’s De Bijenkorf Rotterdam

09:30 - 4 July, 2015

Produced by Dutch journalist Peter Veenendaal, City of Light is a documentary that covers the design, construction, and social effects of Willem Marinus Dudok’s De Bijenkorf in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. De Bijenkorf opened in Rotterdam in 1930, and after barely surviving the Second World War, it was destroyed in 1960 to make way for a Metro Station and a new store designed by Marcel Breuer and largely forgotten. City of Light presents Dudok’s shopping center as an important model for retail architecture that came about during the formative years of the shopping mall, and includes interviews with historians, former employees, and local enthusiasts to bring the building back to life.

Despite being relatively unknown today, Dudok’s De Bijenkorf was important not only for the architectural community, but also for the city of Rotterdam. In Veenendaal’s documentary, architectural historian Herman van Bergeijk remarks that at the time of its construction, De Bijenkorf was the “largest and most modern department store in Europe." The store was immensely popular with locals; according to the video over 70,000 people visited on opening day to explore the building, and over time, it became an icon of Rotterdam's growing commercial success.

PORT Urbanism and R2 Companies Propose Plan to Revitalize Chicago’s Goose Island

08:00 - 3 July, 2015
PORT Urbanism and R2 Companies Propose Plan to Revitalize Chicago’s Goose Island, An oblique aerial view of the Goose Island proposal. Image Courtesy of PORT
An oblique aerial view of the Goose Island proposal. Image Courtesy of PORT

Hoping to reverse the fortunes of this small but distinctive area of Chicago, real estate development firm R2 Companies and urban planning group PORT Urbanism have teamed up to devise a plan to renew Goose Island. A man-made island with a long history of manufacturing, Goose Island lacks the revenue stream of many other Chicago regions, but the development team hopes to improve conditions by 2025 by enabling it to develop into a sustainable, high-tech neighborhood connected to Chicago’s urban grid.

Diagram of existing conditions on Goose Island. Image Courtesy of PORT Diagram of proposed transportation improvements for Goose Island. Image Courtesy of PORT Rendered plan of the Goose Island proposal. Image Courtesy of PORT Diagram of the Goose Island proposal. Image Courtesy of PORT + 11

Could Hovering Buildings be the Future of Sustainability?

09:30 - 28 June, 2015
Could Hovering Buildings be the Future of Sustainability?, Proposals such as Vincent Callebaut's "Hydrogenase" have always been science fiction as much as they are architecture - but with Arx Pax's MFA technology, is it time to think more carefully about how to design levitating buildings?. Image Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures
Proposals such as Vincent Callebaut's "Hydrogenase" have always been science fiction as much as they are architecture - but with Arx Pax's MFA technology, is it time to think more carefully about how to design levitating buildings?. Image Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures

Could Hovering Buildings be the Future of Sustainability?

If Arx Pax, a cutting-edge technology firm led by Greg and Jill Henderson, has its way, levitating objects could become a common sight. The team is developing what they call Magnetic Field Architecture (MFA), a technology which controls electromagnetic energy to make objects hover, and at the several months ago, they used it to produce Hendo Hover, a hoverboard capable of carrying a person. While the fact that Arx Pax was able to produce a hoverboard is fascinating, the technology could have much more serious applications: as an architect, Greg Henderson envisions that one day MFA technology could be used in buildings to produce sustainable structures which can better survive earthquakes and other natural disasters. Is this goal realistic?

Which Video Games Have the Best Architecture?

09:30 - 27 June, 2015

With the ability to manipulate every interaction players have in a game, video game designers have boundless opportunity to shape the way players experience space. Because of this, game designers often look to architecture to enhance gameplay and provide inspiration for the appearances of their virtual worlds.

In the video above, Jamin Warren of YouTube show PBS Game/Show calls Halo the “most creative architectural game,” remarking that the brutalist-inspired architecture of the series exerted a strong influence on the way players move through levels and makes the battles in the game more immersive. Warren notes that several members of Halo’s development team had backgrounds in architecture; this observation suggests that the video gaming industry views architectural design as an essential element in its creative endeavors.

Warren makes an interesting point with his remarks on Halo: while people that inhabit virtual buildings cannot experience them physically, video game buildings can still be incredibly innovative and interesting. Which other video games feature innovative architectural approaches? Check out our list of six of the most architectural video games after the break.

via halowaypoint.com Screenshot from Assassin's Creed: Unity. Image © Flickr CC user Zehta Architecture from the SimCity expansion pack "Cities of Tomorrow". Image © simcity.com The city of Rapture in Bioshock. Image via bioshock.wikia.com + 7

Pompidou Centre Hosts "Le Corbusier: The Measures of Man" Exhibition

06:00 - 25 June, 2015
Pompidou Centre Hosts "Le Corbusier: The Measures of Man" Exhibition, Le Modulor. Image Courtesy of Centre Pompidou / Dist. RMN-GP/ Ph. Migeat; © FLC, ADAGP, Paris 2015
Le Modulor. Image Courtesy of Centre Pompidou / Dist. RMN-GP/ Ph. Migeat; © FLC, ADAGP, Paris 2015

To commemorate the architect 50 years after his death, from April 29 through August 3 the Pompidou center is hosting a retrospective on the life and works of Le Corbusier. The exhibition highlights Le Corbusier’s architecture and artwork, which is curated to trace his evolving understanding of the human body, and includes texts, paintings, drawings, sculptures, and models.

The Best Software Tutorials on the Web (According to ArchDaily Readers)

10:30 - 22 June, 2015
The Best Software Tutorials on the Web (According to ArchDaily Readers), via Shutterstock. © Max Griboedov
via Shutterstock. © Max Griboedov

In a world where architects can use computers to produce representations of designs with new levels of accuracy and artistry, software fluency is becoming increasingly necessary. With that in mind, last month we asked our readers to help us develop a comprehensive list of tutorials. After studying the comments and scouring the internet for more sources, we have developed this improved list, which we hope will help you to discover new work techniques and better ways to apply different programs.

Of course, it's unlikely that any list of internet resources will ever be complete, so we're hoping to continually update this list with the web's best learning resources. If there are any tutorials sites we've missed which you found helpful, let us know in the comments!