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The Royal Architectural Institute Of Canada

4 Principles of Designing with Indigenous Communities

09:30 - 24 July, 2018
4 Principles of Designing with Indigenous Communities, Squamish Lil’Wat Cultural Center - First Nations Lil’Wat Nation and Squamish Nation, British Columbia - Alfred Waugh, MRAIC (Architect in Charge), Formline Architecture, Wanda Dalla Costa and Adam Slawinski. Image © Formline Architecture
Squamish Lil’Wat Cultural Center - First Nations Lil’Wat Nation and Squamish Nation, British Columbia - Alfred Waugh, MRAIC (Architect in Charge), Formline Architecture, Wanda Dalla Costa and Adam Slawinski. Image © Formline Architecture

Indigenous co-design—a more specific form of the general concept of co-design in which an architect collaborates with a stakeholder community—is a collaborative design process between architects and the Indigenous community as the client. The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) recently released a unique resource aimed at designers, clients, funders and policymakers looking for a guide in Indigenous co-design.

Four Case Studies Exemplifying Best Practices in Architectural Co-design and Building with First Nations builds on the success of the RAIC International Indigenous Architecture and Design Symposium held in May 2017. The four case studies set out to explore best practices in Indigenous co-design in the context of three First Nations and one Inuit community in Canada, with one case study selected from each of the four asset classes: "schools, community and cultural centers, administration and business centers, and housing."

Quilakwa Center - First Nation Splatsin te Secwepemc, British Columbia - Norman Goddard, Principal, Norman Goddard Architecture Ltd. & Civic Design; Kevin Halchuk, President, KH Designs; Peter Sperlich, Owner, Canadian Pride Log and Timber Products and Sperlich Construction Inc., and Graham Go, Project Manager. Image © Sperlich Log Construction Inc Emily C. General Elementary Schools - Six Nations of the Grand River, Ontario - Brian Porter, MMMC Architects, Brantford, Ontario. Image © www.mmmc.on.ca IL Thomas Elementary School - Six Nations of the Grand River, Ontario - Brian Porter, MMMC Architects, Brantford, Ontario. Image © Two Row Architect Emily C. General Elementary Schools - Six Nations of the Grand River, Ontario - Brian Porter, MMMC Architects, Brantford, Ontario. Image © www.mmmc.on.ca + 13

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Announces Recipients of 2018 Honorary Fellowships

14:00 - 3 February, 2018
The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Announces Recipients of 2018 Honorary Fellowships, Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) has selected four architects from around the globe to receive 2018 Honorary Fellowships. This year’s Honorary Fellows inductees demonstrate the diverse ways in which architects contribute exemplary designs to the profession that have a positive impact on society.

The architects receiving the honor are French architect Odile Decq, Burkina Faso native, Diébédo Francis Kéré, and American architects William J. Stanley III and John Sorrenti.

More about the Honorary Fellows after the break.