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Shopping Malls: The Latest Architecture and News

World Winners of 2018 Prix Versailles Awards Announced

16:30 - 29 May, 2018

This month the world winners of the Prix Versailles 2018 were announced at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris. This annual recognition celebrates commercial architecture projects from around the world, promoting successful interactions between culture and economy.

The twelve winning projects—including stores, shopping malls, hotels, and restaurants—were selected from the 70 continental finalist teams from 32 different countries. These works of architecture also show projects that recognize architecture's relationship with heritage.

See all of the selected projects after the break.

Prix Versailles Celebrates 24 Projects for Their Outstanding Commercial Architecture in Africa, West Asia and Europe

16:00 - 25 May, 2018
Prix Versailles Celebrates 24 Projects for Their Outstanding Commercial Architecture in Africa, West Asia and Europe, Apple Dubai Mall / Foster + Partners image © Nigel Young; Enigma / RCR Arquitectes - Pau Llimona image © cortesía de RCR Arquitectes/Pau Llimona; Concrete Restaurant / Boozhgan Studio image © Deed Studio. Image
Apple Dubai Mall / Foster + Partners image © Nigel Young; Enigma / RCR Arquitectes - Pau Llimona image © cortesía de RCR Arquitectes/Pau Llimona; Concrete Restaurant / Boozhgan Studio image © Deed Studio. Image

On April, the continental ceremony of the Prix Versailles 2018 took place in the International Center of Conférences d'Alger with the announcement of the selected projects in shops, shopping centers, hotels and restaurants for the "Africa and West Asia" and "Europe" regions.

The 24 new projects are now incorporated into the list of 46 continental winners -from Central America, the South and the Caribbean; North America; Central Asia and the Northeast; and South Asia and the Pacific regions- resulting in 70 projects that will compete in the 2018 Prix Versailles World Final at the UNESCO Headquarters.

See the selected projects after the break.

22 Projects Named Continental Winners of Prix Versailles 2018

14:00 - 16 April, 2018
22 Projects Named Continental Winners of Prix Versailles 2018, Apple Store Michigan Avenue © Nigel Young - Il Mercato image © Documentación Arquitectónica - Ateliê Wäls image © Daniel Mansur - Japan House São Paulo image © FLAGRANTE - Norton Restaurant Image © Haruo Mikami - Ixi’im Restaurant Image © Eduardo Calvo Santisbón. Image
Apple Store Michigan Avenue © Nigel Young - Il Mercato image © Documentación Arquitectónica - Ateliê Wäls image © Daniel Mansur - Japan House São Paulo image © FLAGRANTE - Norton Restaurant Image © Haruo Mikami - Ixi’im Restaurant Image © Eduardo Calvo Santisbón. Image

On Saturday in Santiago, Chile, the Prix Versailles Committee announced the continental winners of its annual awards celebrating built commercial architecture.

Ten winning projects in Central America, the South and the Caribbean and twelve in North America are awarded in four categories: stores, shopping malls, hotels and restaurants. In May, built projects in Africa and Asia will be awarded in Algiers and Beijing. The European winners will be announced in Paris.

Check a gallery of the continental winners projects, below.

Continental Winners Central America, the South and the Caribbean:

Prix Versailles Celebrates 12 Projects for Their Outstanding Commercial Architecture

14:00 - 18 June, 2017
Prix Versailles Celebrates 12 Projects for Their Outstanding Commercial Architecture , Courtesy of Prix Versailles
Courtesy of Prix Versailles

The international Prix Versailles Committee has announced the recipients of its annual awards celebrating built commercial architecture. The awards were held at the UNESCO World Headquarters, with recipients hailing from 6 regions around the world. Chaired by the Mayor of Versailles François de Mazières, the international jury included architects Manuelle Gautrand, Toyo Ito, Wang Shu, and acclaimed chef Guy Laroche.

The 12 World Titles are awarded in 4 top categories: stores, shopping malls, hotels and restaurants. The winners were selected from a diverse range of 70 regional winners already present in the ceremony.

Check out the gallery of the 12 winners below:

Chanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands / MVRDV. Image © MVRDV Tokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan / Nikken Sekkei. Image © Koji Fujii, Nacasa & Partners Inc. Lideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Vilalta Arquitectura. Image © VILALTA Mar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico / Miguel Ángel Aragonés. Image © Joe Fletcher + 118

What Will Become of America's Big Box Stores?

16:00 - 29 June, 2016
© flickr user walmartmovie. Licensed under CC BY 2.0
© flickr user walmartmovie. Licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Walmart Supercenter is generally considered one of the great antagonists of architecture around the world – the hulking behemoth who sold its integrity for the consumer convenience of having everything in one place. Though the first Walmart Supercenter didn’t open until 1988, big box stores have existed in some form since the 1960s, luring in shoppers with low prices and curbside loading lanes. For all the user psychology design that goes into them, the original designs of these buildings rarely pay much mind to their architectural or urban consequences, excluding a few notable exceptions.

Regardless, for the past 20 years big box stores have continued to prosper, prompting tenants to leave their homes and move on to even larger structures, leaving behind giant, open frameworks – for sale on the cheap. In a recent essay for 99% Invisible entitled Ghost Boxes: Reusing Abandoned Big-Box Superstores Across America, author Kurt Kohlstedt explores the architectural potential of these megastructures, drawing inspiration from the architects and communities that have successfully converted them into valuable assets.

Rafael Viñoly to Add World's Largest Green Roof to Former Shopping Mall in California

16:15 - 10 September, 2015
Rafael Viñoly to Add World's Largest Green Roof to Former Shopping Mall in California, © The Hills at Vallco
© The Hills at Vallco

Rafael Viñoly and OLIN have unveiled plans to transform Cupertino's Vallco Shopping Mall into a new mixed-use neighborhood that boasts the "world's largest green roof." The current plans call for a 15-block sustainable town center with 625,000-square-feet of retail, two-million-square-feet of office space and 800 residential units. All this, if approved, would be topped by a 30 acre public green space with a 3.8 mile trail network that runs through orchards, vineyards, an amphitheater and play areas.

Built Nostalgia: Why Some Are Lamenting the Death of the Mall

00:00 - 7 January, 2015
Built Nostalgia: Why Some Are Lamenting the Death of the Mall, Inside the now abandoned White Flint Mall. Image © Flikr CC License / Mike Kalasnik
Inside the now abandoned White Flint Mall. Image © Flikr CC License / Mike Kalasnik

We have all visited places that linger with us long after we leave them, often drawing us back through the memories we made there. When recalling this memory of place, however, we rarely consider malls to be evocative of such powerful emotional connections. A recent article from The Huffington Post argues that these common shopping centers can incite some of the deepest nostalgia. "Why I'm Mourning The Death Of A Mall" delves into the connection between malls and their inherent qualities of independence, community, and growth, and encourages us to view them from a different perspective, as our increasingly technology-centric society may make the mall a thing of the past. Read the article, here.

On Zombies and The Immortality of the Shopping Mall

00:00 - 14 March, 2013
Image via Flickr User CC Gilderic Photography. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
Image via Flickr User CC Gilderic Photography. Used under Creative Commons

This article, which originally appeared on Bullett Media, is by writer Matthew Newton. Newton has written for The Atlantic, Esquire, Forbes, and Guernica, and is currently at work on No Place for Disgrace, a collection of nonfiction stories based on the faded promise of the American suburbs. You can follow him on Twitter @newtonmatthew.

In November of 1977, filmmaker George A. Romero arrived with cast and crew at Monroeville Mall, a sprawling indoor shopping center located in the suburbs east of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The young director, who by that time had established himself as a pioneer in the horror genre, was set to start production on his latest film, Dawn of the Dead, a sequel to his 1968 cult classic Night of the Living Dead. Once again Romero’s slow-shuffling ghouls — starved as always for brains and entrails, meaty thigh bones and plump jugulars — would be unleashed on bumbling humans ill-prepared for a world gone rotten.

This time around, however, Romero, who in Night of the Living Dead touched on issues of race in the civil-rights era, had plans to skewer a new social dilemma: the rise of the American consumer. And to properly lampoon the nation’s burgeoning shop-till-you-drop culture, Romero needed the ideal backdrop.

Read more of Matthew Newton's take on the immortality of the shopping mall, after the break...

Refurbishing America's Shopping Mall

00:00 - 21 February, 2013
Refurbishing America's Shopping Mall, The Arcade Providence © PBN/Brian McDonald via PBN
The Arcade Providence © PBN/Brian McDonald via PBN

One thing about a recession is that it accelerates the demise of dying trends and struggling establishments. In this case, it is America’s beloved shopping malls, which have been slowly in decline since its peak popularity in 1990. Now, in the wake of the 2008 economic catastrophe, American cities are riddled with these abandoned shopping meccas, from the mall to big box stores and shopping strips, whose oversize parking lots are equally as useless as the spaces themselves. The question is, how can we effectively repurpose these spaces?

A perfect example after the break...