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Milan Design Week 2015: The Latest Architecture and News

Daniel Libeskind's "Future Flowers" Represent Oikos at Milan Design Week

Daniel Libeskind, together with Italian paint company Oikos, has transformed the Università Statale’s Pharmacy Courtyard into a garden of "Future Flowers" as part of the 2015 Milan Design Week. On view through May 24, the installation was inspired by one of Libeskind’s "Chamberwork" drawings. It features a series of intersecting red metal "blades" that represent a collection of Oikos paints developed by Libeskind.

The 17 Top Architect-Designed Products at Milan Design Week 2015

The 54th edition of Milan Design Week (also known as Salone del Mobile) recently came to a close. In celebration of its success, we have compiled a list of the most talked about architect-designed products showcased this year. Take a look after the break to see new products from Rem Koolhaas, Zaha Hadid, David Chipperfield, and more.

Soft / Nendo. Image Courtesy of NendoBlur / Ron Arad. Image © Moroso via DezeenLangley / David Chipperfield. Image © e15Open / Rem Koolhaas. Image © Olivari via Domus+ 21

Sergei Tchoban's Mirrored "Mobius Strip" Debuts in Milan

Russian architects Sergei Tchoban (SPEECH architectural office), Sergey Kuznetsov, and Agniya Sterligova are featuring the "Living Line" sculpture at this year's Milan Design Week. Created for a central part of the University of Milan's main courtyard, which occupies the Ca 'Granda complex of 15th century Renaissance buildings, the mirrored plexiglass "Mobius strip" aims to reflect the exhibition's theme "Energy for Life."

Zaha Hadid's 3D Printed Flame Heels Among 5 Designs to Re-Invent the Shoe

FLAMES / Zaha Hadid. Image © United Nude
FLAMES / Zaha Hadid. Image © United Nude

Zaha Hadid, Fernando Romero, and Ben Van Berkel are making headlines alongside two renowned artists for their 3D printed reinventions of the high heel. A collaborative vision spearheaded by United Nude and 3D Systems, the highly anticipated project was unveiled yesterday at the "Re-Inventing Shoes" exhibition at Milan Design Week.

Each sculptural heel was 3D printed using SelectiveLaser Sintering in a hard Nylon and all-new soft Rubber material, making a "fully functioning" shoe. Only up to 50 pairs of each will be sold. See them all, after the break.