All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Design Indaba

Design Indaba: The Latest Architecture and News

“Design can be a Powerful Tool for Good": Mariam Kamara on Changing Narratives through Architecture

13:00 - 30 April, 2019
“Design can be a Powerful Tool for Good": Mariam Kamara on Changing Narratives through Architecture, Courtesy of Design Indaba
Courtesy of Design Indaba

This article was made in partnership with Design Indaba, a website and annual festival that uncovers innovation for good. Click here to learn more about the annual event.

Niger-born architect Mariam Kamara shared how she is shifting perceptions of her home country at the 2019 Design Indaba Conference in Cape Town. Founder of the architecture and research firm atelier masōmī, Kamara was a software developer for several years before joining united4design, a global collective of architects working on projects in the U.S., Afghanistan and Niger. At the Design Indaba Conference, Miriam discusses her work and what it means to put people at the forefront of practice.

Courtesy of Design Indaba Courtesy of Design Indaba Mariam Kamara. Image Courtesy of Design Indaba Courtesy of Design Indaba + 8

A Sustainable Solution for South Africa's Toilet Crisis by the Community, for the Community

05:00 - 29 March, 2019
A Sustainable Solution for South Africa's Toilet Crisis by the Community, for the Community, Courtesy of Nicole Moyo
Courtesy of Nicole Moyo

This article was made in partnership with Design Indaba, a website and annual festival that uncovers innovation for good. Global Graduate Nicole Moyo presented her project Day 1 of the 2019 festival. Click here to learn more about the annual event.

Our planet is home to almost 7 billion people. Out of these 7 billion, more than 5 billion have access to mobile phones, but less have access to working toilets, and more than 1 billion still discharge waste in the open.

Courtesy of Nicole Moyo Courtesy of Nicole Moyo Courtesy of Nicole Moyo Courtesy of Nicole Moyo + 16

Rebuilding Somalia’s Ruined Cities

05:00 - 25 February, 2019
Rebuilding Somalia’s Ruined Cities, Café. Image Courtesy of Design Indaba
Café. Image Courtesy of Design Indaba

Rebuilding lives also means rebuilding living spaces, and this is where Italian-born architect, Omar Degan, comes in.

“I feel that architecture and design play a key role in developing countries, but in particular post-conflict countries,” says Degan.

Michelle Mlati's Afrofuturist Approach To Spatial Planning

07:00 - 15 February, 2019
Michelle Mlati's Afrofuturist Approach To Spatial Planning, Afrofuturist City. Image
Afrofuturist City. Image

With an academic background that includes social sciences, curatorship, and architecture, Michelle Mlati's trajectory is an interesting one; more so for the way her current work dabbles in these areas simultaneously.  

Describing herself as an afrofuturist critical spatial designer, Johannesburg-based Mlati’s practice investigates elements of the city, from sustainability through to social dynamics, architecture to aural and visual cultures.

How Urban Planning Can Help Us Cope With Climate Change

07:00 - 17 January, 2019
How Urban Planning Can Help Us Cope With Climate Change, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated cities on earth. Image via Shutterstock
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated cities on earth. Image via Shutterstock

Cities are hotter than surrounding areas because of a climate phenomena that is known as the urban heat island (UHI). While scientists have studied this effect for decades, new information has recently come to light that points to the way we arrange our cities as a key contributor to raised temperatures. The results could help city planners build our future cities better.

The 2019 Design Indaba Festival in Cape Town Celebrates Design, Culture, and Creativity

09:30 - 20 December, 2018
The 2019 Design Indaba Festival in Cape Town Celebrates Design, Culture, and Creativity, Courtesy of Design Indaba
Courtesy of Design Indaba

Known for hosting the "best creative conference in the world," the Design Indaba Festival brings together internationally-acclaimed architects, designers, emerging talents, critics, and art enthusiasts all under one roof to discuss the importance of making the world a better place through design. Over the last two decades, the annual conference has centered on "design activism," with a focus on online design publications.

The multi-sensory event will take place in the heart of Cape Town from 27 February to 01 March 2019 in the Artscape Theater Center. The theater has been a pioneer in artistic expression and display for more than four decades, providing a platform of world-class productions and innovative sets.

Courtesy of Design Indaba Courtesy of Design Indaba Courtesy of Design Indaba Courtesy of Design Indaba + 8

Snøhetta and Local Studio Unveil Wooden Archway Honoring Archbishop Desmond Tutu in South Africa

12:00 - 8 March, 2018
Snøhetta and Local Studio Unveil Wooden Archway Honoring Archbishop Desmond Tutu in South Africa, Sited between South Africa’s National Parliament and St. George’s Cathedral, the seat of the Archbishop of Cape Town, the Arch frames the public entrance to a landscaped promenade known as the Company’s Garden, which boasts many of the city’s cultural institutions. Image © David Southwood
Sited between South Africa’s National Parliament and St. George’s Cathedral, the seat of the Archbishop of Cape Town, the Arch frames the public entrance to a landscaped promenade known as the Company’s Garden, which boasts many of the city’s cultural institutions. Image © David Southwood

The Arch for Arch, an intertwined wooden archway honoring Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu, has debuted in downtown Cape Town, South Africa on a site near Parliament where Tutu held many of his anti-Apartheid protests.

Designed by Snøhetta and Johannesburg-based Local Studio, in collaboration with Design Indaba and Hatch engineers, the Arch for Arch consists of 14 woven strands of Larch wood, representing the 14 chapters of South Africa’s constitution. Reaching nearly 30 feet tall (9 meters), the structure invite visitors to pass through and be reminded of the location’s prominent role in their country’s history on their way to the Company’s Garden, one of the most popular public spaces in the city since its establishment in 1652.

© David Southwood © David Southwood Pictured at far right: Archbishop Desmond Tutu at the 2017 Design Indaba Conference, where the design was first unveiled. Image Courtesy of Design Indaba The Arch is formed of 14 strands of Siberian Larch wood, a highly durable and resistant material that will weather gracefully over time, taking on the elements of its surroundings. The warmth of wood was intentionally selected to lend the Arch an intimate, tactile quality, that invites people to interact with the structure in a way that differs from the conventional materials people might expect for a memorial structure, such as concrete, steel, or stone. Image © David Southwood + 13