Lawrence Anderson

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Putting Wood on a Pedestal: The Rise of Mid-Rise Podium Design

Podium construction – alternately known as platform or pedestal construction – is a building typology characterized by a horizontal division between a lower ‘podium’ and an upper tower. The podium, which is typically made of concrete or steel, is crowned by multiple light wood-frame stories. Often, the lighter upper structure contains four to five stories of residential units, while the podium houses retail, commercial, or office spaces and above- or below-grade parking. An alternative configuration sports six to seven residential stories (including the podium) and subterranean parking. Some visible examples of this podium construction style include the amenity-rich Stella residences designed by DesignArc; an attractive yet cost-effective student housing project for the University of Washington by Mahlum Architects; and the warm, modern University House Arena District also designed by Mahlum Architects in Eugene, Oregon.

Timber’s Prefab Advantage: How Offsite Prefabrication and Wood Construction can Boost Quality and Construction Speed

Prefabrication is not a new concept for architects, but its usage is evidently on the rise. With today’s limited spatial capacity and need for cost efficiency, the industrial strategy of architectural production has shifted towards an all-around-efficient approach, in some cases assembling projects in a matter of days or weeks [1][2].

Prefabricated wood components, used in both wooden frames and mass timber constructions, have helped solve many design and engineering challenges. In addition to material and time efficiency, reduced waste, and cost control [1][2], prefabricated wood elements offer the advantages of high performing and energy efficient passive designs [3].

© Moelven Limtre© StructureCraft Builders© Ronnie LeoneTimber’s Prefab Advantage: How Offsite Prefabrication and Wood Construction can Boost Quality and Construction Speed+ 8

University of Oregon Jane Sanders Stadium / SRG Partnership

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Moffett Gateway Club / DES Architects + Engineers

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Cloverdale749 / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

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Los Angeles, United States

The Slow Death of the Corporate Architecture of Exclusion

Of all the changes in architectural typologies in recent years, one of the most dramatic - and the most documented - is the transition from corporate to more casual, 'fun' office buildings. This change has infiltrated companies from tiny 5-person start-ups to Silicon Valley giants, and while it has been pioneered by tech and media companies it has certainly not been limited to them.

Most analysis of this change focuses on work patterns created by new technology or the demands of the 'millennial' worker, but this post originally published on Means the World - the blog of NBBJ - examines the shift away from the corporate office as a product of not just what these building are but what they represent about us as a society, arguing that "when today's workers look at the midcentury office, they see a symbol of exclusion."

GoDaddy Silicon Valley Office / DES Architects + Engineers

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Matthew Knight Arena / TVA Architects

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Three Arup Specialists Share Their Vision of The Future of Healthcare Design

This interview was originally posted on Arup Connect and titled "Global perspectives on the future of healthcare design".

In the last few decades, rapid advances in both medical and consumer technologies have created revolutionary possibilities for every aspect of healthcare, from prevention to diagnosis to treatment and beyond. From DNA-based preventative care to digital appointments with doctors thousands of miles away, the future holds enormous potential for improving longevity and quality of life for people around the world.

These dynamics present significant challenges for designers working to shape a built environment that will meet healthcare needs both today and in the future. We spoke with Arup experts from around the globe — Phil Nedin, who heads the firm’s global healthcare business from London; Bill Scrantom, the Los Angeles-based healthcare leader for North and South America; and Katie Wood, who recently relocated from Australia to Toronto to build the Canadian practice — to learn more.

University of California Irvine Contemporary Arts Center / Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects

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Skid Row Housing Trust / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

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Los Angeles, United States

Earl’s Gourmet Grub / FreelandBuck

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Los Angeles, United States

Gardner 1050 / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

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West Hollywood, United States

Formosa 1140 / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

Formosa 1140 / Lorcan O’Herlihy ArchitectsFormosa 1140 / Lorcan O’Herlihy ArchitectsFormosa 1140 / Lorcan O’Herlihy ArchitectsFormosa 1140 / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects+ 12

West Hollywood, United States