Cameron Blaylock

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Children's Playspace / Architensions

© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock+ 19

  • Architects: Architensions
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  875 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020

New York's Interiors: Apartments, Penthouses and Lofts in the Big Apple

15 Union Square West / ODA Architecture + Perkins Eastman Architects. Image © Robert Granoff15 Renwick / ODA New York. Image © Frank Oudeman12th Street, Loft / Neil Logan Architect. Image © Dean KaufmanTribeca Loft / Andrew Franz Architect. Image © Albert Vecerka/Esto+ 63

One of the most important cities in the world –and the most populated in the United States of America–, New York is home to a great mix of cultures and history that has been shaped over the years, while art and architecture play a fundamental role in this development.

Ziggy Installation / Hou de Sousa

© Hou de Sousa© Hou de Sousa© Hou de Sousa© Cameron Blaylock+ 22

  • Architects: Hou de Sousa
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  450 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Chaos Group, McNeel, Onforu, Paracord

Studio Cadena Unveils "Happy" Installation in New York's Flatiron Plaza

Studio Cadena’s Happy installation has been unveiled in New York's Flatiron Plaza. The project is the winner of the fifth annual Design Competition hosted by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) and Van Alen Institute. As the centerpiece of the annual holiday program, the installation was selected by a jury with expertise across the worlds of design and public art, including representatives from the Flatiron Partnership, New York City DOT Art, and Van Alen Institute’s board of trustees.

Happy. Image © Cameron BlaylockHappy. Image © Cameron BlaylockHappy. Image © Cameron BlaylockHappy. Image © Cameron Blaylock+ 7

AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

This article was originally published on June 16, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock+ 26

Eliel and Eero Saarinen: The Sweeping Influence of Architecture's Greatest Father-Son Duo

St Louis Gateway Arch. Image © Flickr user jeffnps licensed under CC BY 2.0
St Louis Gateway Arch. Image © Flickr user jeffnps licensed under CC BY 2.0

It is rare for a father and son to share the same birthday. Even rarer is it for such a duo to work in the same profession; rarer still for them both to achieve international success in their respective careers. This, however, is the story of Eliel and Eero Saarinen, the Finnish-American architects whose combined portfolio tells of the development of modernist architectural thought in the United States. From Eliel’s Art Nouveau-inspired Finnish buildings and modernist urban planning to Eero’s International Style offices and neo-futurist structures, the father-son duo produced a matchless body of work culminating in two individual AIA Gold Medals.

© MWAA<a href='https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficheiro:FirstChristianChurch.jpg'>Photo by Greg Hume</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.pt'>CC BY-SA 2.5</a>© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gabyu/305710396'>Ezra Stoller via Flikr user gabyu</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Helsinki_Railway_Station_20050604.jpg'>Revontuli</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>+ 22

Dumbo Townhouses / Alloy Design

© Pavel Bendov© Cameron Blaylock© Pavel Bendov© Cameron Blaylock+ 25

  • Architects: Alloy Design
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  18000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2015

AD Classics: Haus am Horn / Georg Muche

In 1919, at a time in which Germany was still in upheaval over its defeat in the First World War (and compounded by the loss of its monarchy), the Academy of Fine Arts and School of Applied Arts in Weimar, Germany, were combined to form the first Bauhaus. Its stated goal was to erase the separation that had developed between artists and craftsmen, combining the talents of both occupations in order to achieve a unified architectonic feeling which they believed had been lost in the divide. Students of the Bauhaus were to abandon the framework of design standards that had been developed by traditional European schools and experiment with natural materials, abstract forms, and their own intuitions. Although the school’s output was initially Expressionist in nature, by 1922 it had evolved into something more in line with the rising International Style.[1]

Courtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.. Image © Cameron BlaylockCourtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.. Image © Cameron BlaylockCourtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.. Image © Cameron BlaylockA direct line of sight from the children’s room (in the foreground) to the kitchen allowed for a mother to keep watch over her children without the aid of a servant. ImageCourtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.+ 14

10 Projects Which Define the Architecture of Transit

Architecture inherently appears to be at odds with our mobile world – while one is static, the other is in constant motion. That said, architecture has had, and continues to have, a significant role in facilitating the rapid growth and evolution of transportation: cars require bridges, ships require docks, and airplanes require airports.

In creating structures to support our transit infrastructure, architects and engineers have sought more than functionality alone. The architecture of motion creates monuments – to governmental power, human achievement, or the very spirit of movement itself. AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. Here we've assembled seven projects which stand as enduring symbols of a civilization perpetually on the move.

© Flickr user littleeveCourtesy of Wikimedia user A. Savin under CC BY-SA 3.0© Satoru Mishima / FOA© Cameron Blaylock+ 7

Blurring Boxes / Architensions

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock + 25

  • Architects: Architensions
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  163
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016

Studio Libeskind, Mecanoo and Haptic Appointed to Van Alen Institute's International Council

New York City's Van Alen Institute have announced four new members—Haptic Architects, Mecanoo, Studio Libeskind, and Trahan Architects—to their International Council, a platform for exchange among leading architects, designers, developers, and planners. Furthermore, Jing Liu (SO–IL), Kim Herforth Nielsen (3XN), and Raymond Quinn (Arup) have joined its board of trustees to help guide the organisation's cross-disciplinary research, provocative public programs, and design competitions.

Writing Pavilion / Architensions

© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock© Cameron Blaylock+ 20

New York Light / INABA

Text description provided by the architects. This holiday season, wedged between two New York City icons - the Flatiron and Empire State building - stands the #NewYorkLight public art installation by Brooklyn-based INABA. A magnificent place to experience the Manhattan grid, the installation frames a unique and uninterrupted view of the skyline due to the clearing of Madison Square Park.

© Naho Kubota © Zhonghan Huang© Naho Kubota © Naho Kubota + 14