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Benny Chan

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SOM Designs Kinematic Sculpture for Chicago Design Week

04:00 - 24 October, 2018
SOM Designs Kinematic Sculpture for Chicago Design Week, Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan
Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan

Architecture firm SOM has designed Kinematic Sculpture, an origami-like pavilion installation for Chicago Design Week. Exploring kinematics as the science of motion, the sculpture was formed as one of the firm's ongoing interdisciplinary research projects. As a test in integrated design, the structure aims to establish ideas that foster new architectural and structural solutions for pressing challenges in the built environment.

Kinematic Sculpture. Image © SOM Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan Kinematic Sculpture. Image © Benny Chan + 8

The Center for Early Education Campus Redevelopment / Johnson Favaro

19:00 - 13 October, 2018
The Center for Early Education Campus Redevelopment / Johnson Favaro, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 19

  • Architects

  • Location

    West Hollywood, California, United States
  • Lead Architects

    Johnson Favaro
  • Area

    10000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2020
  • Photographs

Southwestern College Allied Health Sciences Building / Johnson Favaro

21:00 - 12 October, 2018
Southwestern College Allied Health Sciences Building / Johnson Favaro, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 28

  • Architects

  • Location

    National City, California , United States
  • Lead Architects

    Johnson Favaro
  • Area

    35510.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Taslimi Residence / Fleetwood Fernandez Architects

11:00 - 30 January, 2018
Taslimi Residence / Fleetwood Fernandez Architects, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 24

Edmunds.com Headquarters / M+M Creative Studio

16:00 - 1 February, 2017
Edmunds.com Headquarters / M+M Creative Studio, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Santa Monica, CA, United States
  • Architects in Charge

    Chris Mitchell, Sandra Mitchell
  • Executive Architect

    Lewis/Schoeplein architects
  • Area

    145000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Walter and Leonore Annenberg Center for Information Science and Technology at Caltech / Frederick Fisher and Partners

13:00 - 1 October, 2016
Walter and Leonore Annenberg Center for Information Science and Technology at Caltech / Frederick Fisher and Partners, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 21

UCLA Saxon Suites / Studio E Architects

13:00 - 26 May, 2016
UCLA Saxon Suites  / Studio E Architects, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 28

Making Sense of The Broad: A Milestone in the Revitalization of Downtown Los Angeles

10:30 - 22 February, 2016
Making Sense of The Broad: A Milestone in the Revitalization of Downtown Los Angeles, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

Unlike most American cities, which spent the 20th century radiating out into suburbia, Los Angeles befuddles outsiders because it doesn’t really have a definite center. The phrase “LA” is loosely used to refer to a collection of small yet distinct cities across the Los Angeles basin that grew together over time. Traditionally, a handful of these localities have been the cultural centers and tourist destinations (Hollywood, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Silverlake, etc). While these districts thrived, “downtown” sat largely neglected; its financial towers and retail spaces had severe occupancy issues for much of the 90’s and 2000’s. Ten years ago, downtown street life outside of working hours was virtually nonexistent.

That fate was largely the result of poor urban planning. The tragic destruction of the vibrant Bunker Hill residential neighborhood in the 1960’s created a series of vacant freeway-flanked “superblocks” intended for ugly, efficient modernist towers - many of which never reached fruition. To this day, the area is still plagued with empty lots. Developers and architects have considered downtown as a risky return on investment ever since.

DTLA wasn’t just the butt end of jokes (Family Guy: “There’s nothing to do downtown!”) it was treated with disdain. Even Frank Gehry said on record that he wished the Walt Disney Concert Hall had been constructed 12 miles away in Westwood (near UCLA). He went on to add that he felt the current attempted revitalization of downtown was: “both anachronistic and premature.” Ouch.

Courtesy of The Broad and Diller Scofidio + Renfro © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan + 8

The 20 Most Popular Projects of 2015

09:30 - 28 December, 2015
The 20 Most Popular Projects of 2015

If there's one word that sums up our most popular projects of 2015, it's "diversity." The list features architects ranging from old favorites such as SANAA, Diller Scofidio + Renfro and OMA down to newer names like Sculp[IT] and Tropical Space; it also includes everything from museums to multi-family housing and spa retreats to chapels - along with the usual smattering of private residences. Interestingly, this year's list also shows the symbiosis between great architecture and great photography, with no less than 4 projects also appearing in our most bookmarked images from this year's World Photo Day. But despite their diversity, there's one thing all of these 20 projects have in common: great architecture. So settle in, relax and read on - here's our 20 most popular projects of 2015.

Critical Round-Up: The Most Important Buildings and Events of 2015

09:30 - 27 December, 2015
Critical Round-Up: The Most Important Buildings and Events of 2015

The past 12 months have given us plenty to talk about: 2015 saw the opening of several marquee new museums, and the field took an introspective turn with the “State of the Art of Architecture” at the Chicago Biennial. Now it’s December, and that means it’s time for many critics to look back at the triumphs and failures of the year past and make predictions for the year to come.

To add to our own list of the most inspiring leaders, projects and people from 2015, we found what some of our favorite critics had to say, including Oliver Wainwright of The Guardian, Mark Lamster and Alexandra Lange for Curbed, the Los Angeles Times’ Christopher Hawthorne, and Julie V Iovine for The Wall Street Journal. Continue reading for a selection of just some of the buildings and topics which the critics highlighted as having the greatest impact on the architecture world this year.

The Architecture Software Revolution: From One Size Fits All to DIY

09:30 - 11 December, 2015
The Architecture Software Revolution: From One Size Fits All to DIY, Cedars-Sinai 360 Simulation Lab / Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design. Image © Benny Chan
Cedars-Sinai 360 Simulation Lab / Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design. Image © Benny Chan

We’ve always been a profession of hackers. Every building is a one-off made up of countless elegant hacks, each bringing disparate materials and systems together into a cohesive whole. But when it comes to the software that designers have come to rely on, most of us have been content with enthusiastic consumerism, eagerly awaiting the next releases from software developers like Autodesk, McNeel (Rhino) and Bentley (MicroStation).

It’s been 5 years since we officially launched our research program at the Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design, and during that period we’ve come to understand the evolution of our process reflects the larger, changing relationship architects have with their means of production. Specifically, we've noticed that in late 2007 something changed. McNeel introduced a visual programming plugin called Grasshopper, and more and more architects began to hack their tools as well as their buildings.

Courtesy of Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign Courtesy of Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign Courtesy of Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign Courtesy of Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign + 7

Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

09:30 - 9 November, 2015
Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

In the mid-1980s, after literature had long been held hostage by postmodernist irony and cynicism, a new wave of authors called for an end to negativity, promoting a "new sincerity" for fiction. Gaining momentum into the 1990s, the movement reached a pinnacle in 1993 when, in his essay E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction, pop-culture seer David Foster Wallace, a proponent of this "new sincerity," made the following call to action: “The next real literary ‘rebels’ in this country might well emerge as some weird bunch of anti-rebels, born oglers who dare somehow to back away from ironic watching, who have the childish gall actually to endorse and instantiate single-entendre principles... These anti-rebels would be outdated, of course, before they even started. Dead on the page. Too sincere. Clearly repressed. Backward, quaint, naive, anachronistic. Maybe that’ll be the point. Maybe that’s why they’ll be the next real rebels. Real rebels, as far as I can see, risk disapproval. The old postmodern insurgents risked the gasp and squeal: shock, disgust, outrage, censorship, accusations of socialism, anarchism, nihilism. Today’s risks are different. The new rebels might be artists willing to risk the yawn, the rolled eyes, the cool smile, the nudged ribs, the parody of gifted ironists, the ‘Oh how banal.'"

Architecture, ever in debt to the styles and ideas of other art forms, could learn a thing or two now from the resuscitation of American fiction at the turn of the millennium. It too is enduring an identity crisis, mired by pessimism and uncertainty - a reality made painfully clear this past January when a New York Times Op-Ed by Steven Bingler and Martin C. Pedersen, How to Rebuild Architecture, divided camps and made the design world fume. In the editorial, the authors spoke vehemently of an architectural profession that has become mired by egos and been disconnected from public needs. Things quickly got ugly, critics wrestled with critics and subsequently the public got involved. What no one seemed to take into account is that this type of hounding is at the core of the problem. In its current landscape the discipline has struggled with its past, been deferential to its present, and wrestled with the uncertainty of its future. In a moment when we have become addicted to despondency, can anyone win?

The Broad Museum / Diller Scofidio + Renfro

11:00 - 31 August, 2015
The Broad Museum / Diller Scofidio + Renfro, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Jeff Duran - Warren Air © Iwan Baan       © Iwan Baan       © Iwan Baan       + 20

Keck Institute for Space Studies / Lehrer Architects

01:00 - 3 September, 2014
Keck Institute for Space Studies / Lehrer Architects, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 11

  • Architects

  • Location

    California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
  • Area

    7200.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

Museum of Tolerance, Anne Frank Exhibit / Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design

01:00 - 18 August, 2014
© Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 15

Cedars-Sinai 360 Simulation Lab / Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design

01:00 - 14 August, 2014
Cedars-Sinai 360 Simulation Lab / Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design, © Benny Chan
© Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 13

Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust / Belzberg Architects

01:00 - 18 January, 2014
Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust / Belzberg Architects, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan       © Iwan Baan       © Benny Chan © Iwan Baan       + 46

  • Architects

  • Location

    100 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90036, United States
  • Architect in Charge

    Hagy Belzberg
  • Design Team

    Andrew Atwood, Barry Gartin, Brock DeSmit, Carina Bien-Wilner , Christopher Arntzen, Cory Taylor, Daniel Rentsch, David Cheung, Eric Stimmel, Erik Sollom, Justin Brechtel, Philip Lee, Lauren Zuzack
  • Project Manager

    Aaron Leppanen
  • Area

    27000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2010
  • Photographs

Fox Head / Clive Wilkinson Architects

01:00 - 15 November, 2013
© Benny Chan
© Benny Chan
  • Architects

  • Location

    Irvine, CA, United States
  • Architect in Charge

    Clive Wilkinson, Sam Farhang, Sasha Shumyatsky, Matt Moran, Chester Nielsen, Andrea Schoening, Mitsuhiro Komatsu, Annie Ritz, Meredith McDaniel
  • Area

    82000.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2012
  • Photographs

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan + 24