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Cape Town

5 Fin Whale Way / SALT Architects

02:00 - 15 May, 2018
5 Fin Whale Way / SALT Architects, © Lindsay Ray Michael & Kevin Michael
© Lindsay Ray Michael & Kevin Michael

© Lindsay Ray Michael & Kevin Michael © Lindsay Ray Michael & Kevin Michael © Lindsay Ray Michael & Kevin Michael © Lindsay Ray Michael & Kevin Michael + 27

Snøhetta and Local Studio Unveil Wooden Archway Honoring Archbishop Desmond Tutu in South Africa

12:00 - 8 March, 2018
Snøhetta and Local Studio Unveil Wooden Archway Honoring Archbishop Desmond Tutu in South Africa, Sited between South Africa’s National Parliament and St. George’s Cathedral, the seat of the Archbishop of Cape Town, the Arch frames the public entrance to a landscaped promenade known as the Company’s Garden, which boasts many of the city’s cultural institutions. Image © David Southwood
Sited between South Africa’s National Parliament and St. George’s Cathedral, the seat of the Archbishop of Cape Town, the Arch frames the public entrance to a landscaped promenade known as the Company’s Garden, which boasts many of the city’s cultural institutions. Image © David Southwood

The Arch for Arch, an intertwined wooden archway honoring Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu, has debuted in downtown Cape Town, South Africa on a site near Parliament where Tutu held many of his anti-Apartheid protests.

Designed by Snøhetta and Johannesburg-based Local Studio, in collaboration with Design Indaba and Hatch engineers, the Arch for Arch consists of 14 woven strands of Larch wood, representing the 14 chapters of South Africa’s constitution. Reaching nearly 30 feet tall (9 meters), the structure invite visitors to pass through and be reminded of the location’s prominent role in their country’s history on their way to the Company’s Garden, one of the most popular public spaces in the city since its establishment in 1652.

© David Southwood © David Southwood Pictured at far right: Archbishop Desmond Tutu at the 2017 Design Indaba Conference, where the design was first unveiled. Image Courtesy of Design Indaba The Arch is formed of 14 strands of Siberian Larch wood, a highly durable and resistant material that will weather gracefully over time, taking on the elements of its surroundings. The warmth of wood was intentionally selected to lend the Arch an intimate, tactile quality, that invites people to interact with the structure in a way that differs from the conventional materials people might expect for a memorial structure, such as concrete, steel, or stone. Image © David Southwood + 13

Invermark House / SAOTA

02:00 - 27 October, 2017
Invermark House / SAOTA, © Adam Letch
© Adam Letch

© Stefan Antoni © Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch + 20

  • Architects

  • Location

    Cape Town, South Africa
  • Architects & Interior Architects

    Gilbert Colyn (1969) and SAOTA
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa / Heatherwick Studio

03:00 - 18 September, 2017
Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa / Heatherwick Studio, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan + 23

  • Architects

  • Location

    Cape Town, South Africa
  • Design Director

    Thomas Heatherwick
  • Local Project Architect

    Van der Merwe Miszewski Architects (VDMMA), Jacobs Parkers Architects, Rick Brown + Associates
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Tree House / Malan Vorster Architecture Interior Design

02:00 - 20 June, 2017
Tree House / Malan Vorster Architecture Interior Design, © Adam Letch
© Adam Letch

© Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch + 33

Clifton House / Malan Vorster Architecture Interior Design

02:00 - 18 June, 2017
Clifton House  / Malan Vorster Architecture Interior Design, © Adam Letch
© Adam Letch

© Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch + 36

OVD525 / Three14Architects

02:00 - 5 February, 2017
OVD525 / Three14Architects, © Adam Letch
© Adam Letch

© Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch + 45

  • Architects

  • Location

    Cape Town, South Africa
  • Project Team

    Kim Benatar, Sian Fisher, Miles Appelgryn, Daniel Moreau
  • Area

    650.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

How to Change Cities With Culture: 10 Tips Using UNESCO

08:00 - 23 January, 2017
How to Change Cities With Culture: 10 Tips Using UNESCO, "The Old Bridge in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina / Photo: ru.wikipedia.org". Image Courtesy of Strelka Magazine
"The Old Bridge in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina / Photo: ru.wikipedia.org". Image Courtesy of Strelka Magazine

This article, written by Svetlana Kondratyeva and translated by Olga Baltsatu for Strelka Magazine, examines the most interesting cases of the role of culture in sustainable urban development based on the UNESCO report.

UNESCO published the Global Report on Culture for Sustainable Urban Development in the fall of 2016. Two UN events stimulated its creation: a document entitled Transforming our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which emphasizes seventeen global goals for future international collaboration, was signed in September of 2015 at the Summit in New York. Habitat III, the conference held once in twenty years and dedicated to housing and sustainable urban development, took place in Ecuador in October of 2016. The question of culture’s role in urban development, and what problems it can solve, was raised at both events. To answer it, UNESCO summarized global experience and included successful cases of landscaping, cultural politics, events, and initiatives from different corners of the world in the report.

Stellenbosch University Faculty of Medicine / MLB Architects

05:00 - 5 January, 2017
Stellenbosch University Faculty of Medicine / MLB Architects, © Wieland Gleich
© Wieland Gleich

© Wieland Gleich              © Wieland Gleich              © Wieland Gleich              © Wieland Gleich              + 19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Bellville, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Architects in Charge

    Erik Janse van Rensburg, Peter Kraus, Xico Meirelles
  • Area

    10000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2014

Urban Man Cave / Inhouse Brand Architects

03:00 - 25 October, 2016
Urban Man Cave / Inhouse Brand Architects, © Riaan West
© Riaan West

© Riaan West © Riaan West © Riaan West © Riaan West + 21

The World's Most Creative Neighborhoods: Metropolis Names Mumbai, Lagos and Lisbon Among Top Ten

09:31 - 2 October, 2016
The World's Most Creative Neighborhoods: Metropolis Names Mumbai, Lagos and Lisbon Among Top Ten, Avenidas Novas in Lisbon. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lisboa_Avenida_Novas.jpg'>Wikimedia user Cruks</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Avenidas Novas in Lisbon. Image © Wikimedia user Cruks licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

From Yaba in Lagos to the suburb of Bandra in Mumbai, Metropolis Magazine provides a scenic tour around the world’s “most creative” neighborhoods. Spread across ten rapidly growing cities like Cape Town and Turin, the article provides a comprehensive glimpse into these lesser discussed hubs of creativity.

The Midden Garden Pavilion / Metropolis Design

05:00 - 19 September, 2016
The Midden Garden Pavilion  / Metropolis Design, © Wieland Gleich
© Wieland Gleich

© Wieland Gleich © Wieland Gleich © Wieland Gleich © Wieland Gleich + 27

House in Constantia Valley / Metropolis Design

02:00 - 12 September, 2016
House in Constantia Valley / Metropolis Design, © Wieland Gleich - ARCHIGRAPHY
© Wieland Gleich - ARCHIGRAPHY

© Wieland Gleich - ARCHIGRAPHY © Wieland Gleich - ARCHIGRAPHY © Wieland Gleich - ARCHIGRAPHY © Wieland Gleich - ARCHIGRAPHY + 24

Rooiels Beach House / Elphick Proome Architects

02:00 - 15 August, 2016
Rooiels Beach House / Elphick Proome Architects , © Dennis Guichard
© Dennis Guichard

© Dennis Guichard © Dennis Guichard © Dennis Guichard © Dennis Guichard + 37

French School Cape Town / Kritzinger Architects

05:00 - 14 February, 2016
French School Cape Town / Kritzinger Architects, © Adam Letch
© Adam Letch

© Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch + 22

  • Architects

  • Location

    Kings Rd, Sea Point, Cape Town, 8060, South Africa
  • Quantity Surveyor

    Shevel & Simpson Quantity Surveyors
  • Area

    2650.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

OVD 919 / SAOTA

02:00 - 21 May, 2015
OVD 919 / SAOTA, © Adam Letch
© Adam Letch

© Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch + 19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Cape Town, South Africa
  • Design Team

    Philip Olmesdahl, Tamaryn Fourie & Joe Schützer-Weissmann
  • Interior Decor

    Studio Parkington
  • Project Year

    2014

7 Architects Designing a Diverse Future in Africa

10:30 - 26 February, 2015

As the legacy of the Cold War fades and Western preeminence gradually becomes a thing of the past, population booms in Asia followed by the growth of a vast non-western middle class have seriously challenged the Western perception of the world. The East has become the focal point of the world’s development.

If East Asia is the present focal point of this development, the future indisputably lies in Africa. Long featuring in the Western consciousness only as a land of unending suffering, it is now a place of rapidly falling poverty, increasing investment, and young populations. It seems only fair that Africa’s rich cultures and growing population (predicted to reach 1.4 billion by 2025) finally take the stage, but it’s crucially important that Africa’s future development is done right. Subject to colonialism for centuries, development in the past was characterized by systems that were designed for the benefit of the colonists. Even recently, resource and energy heavy concrete buildings, clothes donations that damage native textile industries, and reforestation programs that plant water hungry and overly flammable trees have all been seen, leaving NGOs open to accusations of well-meaning ignorance.

Fortunately, a growth in native practices and a more sensible, sensitive approach from foreign organizations has led to the rise of architectural groups creating buildings which learn from and improve Africa. Combining local solutions with the most appropriate Western ideas, for the first time these new developments break down the perception of monolithic Africa and have begun engaging with individual cultures; using elements of non-local architecture when they improve a development rather than creating a pastiche of an imagined pan-African culture. The visions these groups articulate are by no means the same - sustainable rural development, high end luxury residences and dignified civic constructions all feature - but they have in common their argument for a bright future across Africa. We’ve collected seven pioneers of Africa’s architectural awakening - read on after the break for the full article and infographic.

Pretoria's Freedom Park, designed by MMA Design Studio with GAPP Architects and MRA Architects. Image Courtesy of MMA Design Studio, GAPP Architects and MRA Architects The Makoko Floating School in Lagos, Nigeria. Image © NLÉ Architects Butaro Hospital in Rwanda. Image © Iwan Baan Red Pepper House in Lamu, Kenya. Image © Alberto Heras + 29

Clifton 2A / SAOTA

01:00 - 5 February, 2015
Clifton 2A / SAOTA, © Adam Letch
© Adam Letch

© Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch © Adam Letch + 16

  • Architects

  • Location

    Cape Town, South Africa
  • Design Team

    Philip Olmesdahl, Tamaryn Fourie, Thaabe Ramabina
  • Interior Design

    Janine Lazard Interiors
  • Area

    1120.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs