A Vertical Neighborhood in Tehran and a Zero Emission House on the Beach: 9 Unbuilt Projects Submitted by our Readers

A Vertical Neighborhood in Tehran and a Zero Emission House on the Beach: 9 Unbuilt Projects Submitted by our Readers

This week’s curated selection of best unbuilt architecture features conceptual residential projects submitted by our readers from all around the world. Highlighting innovative designs, approaches, and compositions, this roundup puts together a series of inspiring interventions that offer a fresh look on the typical house structure.

In the following article, ArchDaily has gathered ideas from Poland, France, Hungary, Iran, and the United States. Grouped under one common theme, the feature includes a new take on the typical building complex, an attempt to shorten the transitional gap between a house and an apartment, and a collection of modular residential models that can be implemented anywhere. Moreover, it also showcases Christophe Benichou’s latest intervention, “The Pleated House” located in the Hautes Alpes in France, a hyper-sustainable house on the beach and a structure completely erased and integrated into the natural landscape.

Bookan Residential Tower. Image Courtesy of STUDIO SAHEBMAISON W. Image Courtesy of Christophe Benichou & Virgile PonsoyeDamavand villa. Image Courtesy of ARC- Ashkan Rafiey CooperationGarden Walk House. Image Courtesy of FORMA Architects, PLLC & Mark Gettys Architects+ 53

Read on to discover 9 conceptual house proposals and their descriptions from the architects.

Bookan Residential Tower

STUDIO SAHEB

Bookan Residential Tower. Image Courtesy of STUDIO SAHEB
Bookan Residential Tower. Image Courtesy of STUDIO SAHEB

Bookan Residential Tower. Image Courtesy of STUDIO SAHEBBookan Residential Tower. Image Courtesy of STUDIO SAHEBBookan Residential Tower. Image Courtesy of STUDIO SAHEBBookan Residential Tower. Image Courtesy of STUDIO SAHEB+ 53

Bookan residential tower is a 10 story tower located in the northern part of Tehran. Seeking for an innovative solution to provide moments of the traditional lifestyle of living in villas in this new vertical tower, while having sufficient light and space for greenery, the proposal works with the notion of façade and its relation to mass and the way it defines the border between inside and outside. Contrary to the usual take on facades that consists of pushing it inward and sticking it to the central core in a way that living spaces remained in their places, many high-quality in-between spaces have been created which raise the quality of inhabitant’s life.

Dune House

Studio Vural

Dune House . Image Courtesy of STUDIO VURAL
Dune House . Image Courtesy of STUDIO VURAL

Dune House . Image Courtesy of STUDIO VURALDune House . Image Courtesy of STUDIO VURALDune House . Image Courtesy of STUDIO VURALDune House . Image Courtesy of STUDIO VURAL+ 53

Initially inspired by a squid’s rainbow flash at a nighttime fishing expedition, the Dune House is a powerful prototype for the future of homes at a global scale. There are no machines but humming electrical devices that power, heat, cool and vent. There is no chemical waste or fuel. The only carbon emission is the candlelight on the dinner table. The construction is planned to be respectful of local bird and animal habitats and is a success in natural preservation since it is only recognizable from sea and blends seamlessly with nature; immersed not imposed.

Koocheha

Boozhgan studio

Koocheha. Image Courtesy of Boozhgan studio
Koocheha. Image Courtesy of Boozhgan studio

Koocheha. Image Courtesy of Boozhgan studioKoocheha. Image Courtesy of Boozhgan studioKoocheha. Image Courtesy of Boozhgan studioKoocheha. Image Courtesy of Boozhgan studio+ 53

“Koocheha”, meaning alleyways, is an attempt to shorten the transitional gap between a house and an apartment. The project has revolved around the creation of a vertical neighborhood; of single houses that are embedded in a residential complex. The design process had two main concerns: circulation throughout the vertical and horizontal connections, and also provision of light to all units. In order to resolve these issues, the building mass is divided into two volumes creating a void in between them.

Garden Walk House

FORMA Architects, PLLC & Mark Gettys Architects

Garden Walk House. Image Courtesy of FORMA Architects, PLLC & Mark Gettys Architects
Garden Walk House. Image Courtesy of FORMA Architects, PLLC & Mark Gettys Architects

Garden Walk House. Image Courtesy of FORMA Architects, PLLC & Mark Gettys ArchitectsGarden Walk House. Image Courtesy of FORMA Architects, PLLC & Mark Gettys ArchitectsGarden Walk House. Image Courtesy of FORMA Architects, PLLC & Mark Gettys ArchitectsGarden Walk House. Image Courtesy of FORMA Architects, PLLC & Mark Gettys Architects+ 53

Using the local vernacular of ocean building – an elevated walkway, wooden fencing, and structural stilts – the project reimagines the canonical beach house by inserting a series of exterior volumes into interior domestic spaces. Rather than packing all the house functions into a singular volume, the sleeping, bathing, living, and pool-lounging areas are pulled apart and interspersed with open-air gardens. An elevated boardwalk links the spaces together along a singular axis, directing movement and the eye toward the ocean.

Maison W - The Pleated House

Christophe Benichou & Virgile Ponsoye

MAISON W. Image Courtesy of Christophe Benichou & Virgile Ponsoye
MAISON W. Image Courtesy of Christophe Benichou & Virgile Ponsoye

MAISON W. Image Courtesy of Christophe Benichou & Virgile PonsoyeMAISON W. Image Courtesy of Christophe Benichou & Virgile PonsoyeMAISON W. Image Courtesy of Christophe Benichou & Virgile PonsoyeMAISON W. Image Courtesy of Christophe Benichou & Virgile Ponsoye+ 53

The Maison W, or “the pleated house”, is a rental housing project located on the slopes of the Pic de Charance, above Gap in the Hautes Alpes in France. It is a singular architecture project. It is discreet and exuberant, strange and familiar. It is familiar because it takes up the codes of the modern villa, paying tribute to it. It is also strange when it dares diverting from the abstraction of it. It distorts its lines and folds to try to establish a dialogue with the local geology while offering unique architectural sensations inspired by both the client and the site’s singularity.

Damavand villa

ARC- Ashkan Rafiey Cooperation

Damavand villa. Image Courtesy of ARC- Ashkan Rafiey Cooperation
Damavand villa. Image Courtesy of ARC- Ashkan Rafiey Cooperation

Damavand villa. Image Courtesy of ARC- Ashkan Rafiey CooperationDamavand villa. Image Courtesy of ARC- Ashkan Rafiey CooperationDamavand villa. Image Courtesy of ARC- Ashkan Rafiey CooperationDamavand villa. Image Courtesy of ARC- Ashkan Rafiey Cooperation+ 53

This project poses the question of how a recognized space can perform as the structure of a villa. Doing so, instead of designing a plan inside a structural envelope, with recognizing private and public spaces of a villa, and extracting them from one another, the villa can be defined by two elements, enabling the spaces to express their plans as they are. This project is a single unit house located in Damavand, Iran. The site of the project overlooks a broad view of nature, including the Damavand volcano.

Landscape house

Adrian Kasperski Architekt

Landscape house. Image Courtesy of Adrian Kasperski Architekt
Landscape house. Image Courtesy of Adrian Kasperski Architekt

Landscape house. Image Courtesy of Adrian Kasperski ArchitektLandscape house. Image Courtesy of Adrian Kasperski ArchitektLandscape house. Image Courtesy of Adrian Kasperski ArchitektLandscape house. Image Courtesy of Adrian Kasperski Architekt+ 53

The house was designed in the hilly scenery of the Krakow Valleys. Principal assumptions of the project were suited to a context, proximity to nature, and preservation of intimacy by future inhabitants. The project entails a transformation and an attempt of maximal use of a surrounding landscape and nature, a creation of shelter to dwell in with a simultaneous the least possible interference in the natural values of an existing place. The building seems to be invisible from the western and southern parts. A green roof adjusted to a natural land inclination does not spoil a surrounding landscape.

inHAUS

Casas inHAUS + Fran Silvestre Architects / Mario Ruiz / Yonoh

Casas inHAUS BY Yonoh. Image Courtesy of Casas inHAUS + Fran Silvestre Architects / Mario Ruiz / Yonoh
Casas inHAUS BY Yonoh. Image Courtesy of Casas inHAUS + Fran Silvestre Architects / Mario Ruiz / Yonoh

Casas inHAUS BY Mario Ruiz. Image Courtesy of Casas inHAUS + Fran Silvestre Architects / Mario Ruiz / YonohCasas inHAUS BY Mario Ruiz. Image Courtesy of Casas inHAUS + Fran Silvestre Architects / Mario Ruiz / YonohCasas inHAUS BY Yonoh. Image Courtesy of Casas inHAUS + Fran Silvestre Architects / Mario Ruiz / YonohCasas inHAUS BY Fran Silvestre Architects. Image Courtesy of Casas inHAUS + Fran Silvestre Architects / Mario Ruiz / Yonoh+ 53

Fran Silvestre Architects, Mario Ruiz, and Yonoh Creative Studio have been in charge of designing the new models that the Valencian modular houses company Casas inHAUSwill offer to its future clients worldwide. The new housing designs range from transferring the Mediterranean essence with Fran Silvestre, to a volume set by Yonoh Creative Studio, defined by light and the play of planes, and finally, a curved and fluid space that creates a refuge from the environment by Mario Ruiz.

House of Waves

Páricsy and Partners Architects

House of Waves . Image Courtesy of Páricsy and Partners Architects
House of Waves . Image Courtesy of Páricsy and Partners Architects

House of Waves . Image Courtesy of Páricsy and Partners ArchitectsHouse of Waves . Image Courtesy of Páricsy and Partners ArchitectsHouse of Waves . Image Courtesy of Páricsy and Partners ArchitectsHouse of Waves . Image Courtesy of Páricsy and Partners Architects+ 53

The house is situated on the top of the hills surrounding Budapest, on a site that declines evenly to the southwest. The shape of the house is a quite low-key part of the street-view. The unique form of the house is defined by two intersecting cuboids that lie on top of each other. The social spaces can be found in the cuboid parallel to the street, while the private areas are located in the orthogonal one. Where the cuboids intersect each other, you can find the supplementary rooms and the stairs.

HOW TO SUBMIT AN UNBUILT PROJECT

We highly appreciate the input from our readers and are always happy to see more projects designed by them. If you have an Unbuilt project to submit, click here and follow the guidelines. Our curators will review your submission and get back to you in case it is selected for a feature.

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Cite: Christele Harrouk. "A Vertical Neighborhood in Tehran and a Zero Emission House on the Beach: 9 Unbuilt Projects Submitted by our Readers" 03 Jun 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/940852/a-vertical-neighborhood-in-tehran-and-a-zero-emission-house-on-the-beach-9-unbuilt-projects-submitted-by-our-readers> ISSN 0719-8884
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Dune House . Image Courtesy of STUDIO VURAL

本周未建成:德黑兰的垂直社区,坐落在海滩上的零排放房屋

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