World Trade Center River Wall May Be Leaking

16:00 - 26 August, 2015
World Trade Center River Wall May Be Leaking, Snøhetta's entrance building, with one of Michael Arad's Memorial Fountains in the foreground. Image © Jeff Goldberg / ESTO
Snøhetta's entrance building, with one of Michael Arad's Memorial Fountains in the foreground. Image © Jeff Goldberg / ESTO

Sounds of rushing water have been reported behind the walls of the lower concourses of the World Trade Center site. As DNAinfo reports, rumors say officials have found an underground leak within the newly built complex and fear that it may be coming from the 3,200-foot-long slurry wall that separates the site from the Hudson River. 

Zaha Hadid Unveils High Line Installation

10:40 - 19 August, 2015
Zaha Hadid Unveils High Line Installation, Zaha Hadid’s High Line Installation, named Allongé, is now on view. Image © Scott Frances
Zaha Hadid’s High Line Installation, named Allongé, is now on view. Image © Scott Frances

With the construction of their High Line-adjacent residential building 520 West 28th Street, Zaha Hadid Architects have constructed a temporary construction shelter to protect pedestrians in the event of any falling construction materials. However, as is often the case with Zaha Hadid designs, this is a construction shelter unlike any other, serving as a protective shelter but also as an artistic installation.

Named Allongé, the installation is "is inspired by the connectivity and dynamism of movement along the High Line," allowing visitors to the High Line to move through 34 meters (112 feet) of sweeping metallic fabric supported by a curvilinear steel frame, offering a spatial experience that foreshadows the presence of Hadid's building at the site.

9 Projects Selected for AIA Education Facility Design Awards

08:00 - 12 August, 2015
William Rawn Associates / The Berklee Tower. Image © Robert Benson Photography
William Rawn Associates / The Berklee Tower. Image © Robert Benson Photography

The American Institute of Architects (AIA)'s Committee on Architecture for Education (CAE) has announced the winners of its CAE Education Facility Design Awards, which honor educational facilities that “serve as an example of a superb place in which to learn, furthering the client’s mission, goals, and educational program, while demonstrating excellence in architectural design.”

A variety of project designs, such as public elementary and high schools, charter schools, and higher education facilities, were submitted to the Committee, many of which incorporated “informal and flexible spaces for collaboration and social interaction adjacent to teaching spaces,” as well as staircases with amphitheater or forum designs.

Find out which projects received awards, after the break.

The Rise and Fall of Buffalo's Curious Telescope Houses

09:30 - 10 August, 2015
© David Schalliol
© David Schalliol

One of the most fascinating things about vernacular architecture is that, while outsiders may find a certain city fascinating, local residents might be barely aware of the quirks of their own surroundings. In this photographic study from Issue 4 of Satellite Magazine, originally titled "The Telescope Houses of Buffalo, New York," David Schalliol investigates the unusual extended dwellings of New York State's second-largest city.

The first time I visited Buffalo, New York, I was there to photograph the great buildings of the city’s late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century expansion for the Society of Architectural Historians: monumental buildings designed by Louis Sullivan, Fellheimer & Wagner, and, later, Frank Lloyd Wright. Many of these architects were the period’s leading designers, outsiders from Chicago and New York City hired to announce the arrival of this forward-looking city at the connection of Lake Erie and the Erie Canal.

These remarkable buildings, and the grain elevators that made them possible, have been thoroughly documented and praised, but they are also a far cry from the vernacular architecture I typically study. When I returned to Buffalo for the second, third, and—now—sixth times, I became fascinated by another building type: the Buffalo telescope house.

© David Schalliol © David Schalliol © David Schalliol © David Schalliol +20

Inside Santiago Calatrava's WTC Transportation Hub in New York

12:45 - 31 July, 2015
© Michael Muraz
© Michael Muraz

Toronto-based architectural photographer Michael Muraz has shared with us some of the first images seen inside Santiago Calatrava's nearly complete World Trade Center Transportation Hub. Set to open this year, the "glorious" birdlike structure boasts a 355-foot-long operable "Oculus" - a "slice of the New York sky - that floods the hub's interior with natural light, all the way down 60-feet below street level to the PATH train platform. 

Though its been shamed for being years overdue and $2 billion over budget (making it the world's most expensive transit hub), the completed project is turning heads. Take a look for yourself after the break. 

© Michael Muraz © Michael Muraz © Michael Muraz © Michael Muraz +10

New York's LaGuardia Airport to Get 21st Century Makeover

14:34 - 28 July, 2015
New York's LaGuardia Airport to Get 21st Century Makeover , © Governor Andrew Cuomo
© Governor Andrew Cuomo

Governor Andrew Cuomo has unveiled a $4 billion plan to redevelop New York's outdated LaGuardia Airport. Originally built in 1939, LaGuardia has been running inefficiently and overcapacity for decades.

The redesign, envisioned by HOK and Parsons Brinckerhoff, will unify the airport's fragmented terminals with a single roof, while providing expanded transportation access, elite passenger amenities and increased taxiway space. Terminal B will be replaced with a larger structure that will (eventually) connect to the renovated Terminals C and D. 

How Bjarke Ingels is Reshaping New York City's Architecture

14:34 - 27 July, 2015

Bjarke Ingels has become know for his “promiscuous hybrids" that are reshaping skylines worldwide. Now, after news of BIG's redesign of the 2 World Trade Center, Ingels is being credited for single-handedly transforming New York City's architecture. At the New York Times' Cities of Tomorrow conference last week, architecture critic Michael Kimmelman sat down with the 40-year-old Danish architect to discuss just how BIG is changing New York

Calvin Seibert Sculpts Impressive Modernist Sandcastles

12:00 - 25 July, 2015
Calvin Seibert Sculpts Impressive Modernist Sandcastles, © Calvin Seibert
© Calvin Seibert

“I always had an affinity for architecture which I attribute to growing up in a neighborhood and town that was constantly under construction. Our house was the first on the block. I think that in a way I was more interested in the abstractness of the foundations and the initial framing then in the completed structures themselves. Things I made back then had that incompleteness about them. As I became more aware of architecture in the wider world Brutalism was one of the styles of the moment. Looking at architecture magazines as a child and seeing hotels in French ski resorts (Marcel Breuer at Flaine) made of concrete suited my sensibility, I was hooked.”

For New York-based Calvin Seibert, sandcastles are more than just a fun summer hobby. Using a paint bucket, homemade plastic trowels, and up to about 150 gallons of water he creates spectacular modernist sandcastles. Read on after the break for an interview with Seibert and to see more photos of his work. 

© Calvin Seibert © Calvin Seibert © Calvin Seibert © Calvin Seibert +17

Steven Holl Architects Breaks Ground on the “Ex of In" House in New York

12:00 - 21 July, 2015
Model. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Model. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl Architects has broken ground on the “Ex of In House,” an experimental guest house and artist studio in Rhinebeck, New York. The house is part of the firms’ ongoing research project “Explorations of In,” which questions “current clichés of architectural language and commercial practice” and explores spatial language, energy, openness and public space.

See How Much New York Has Changed Since the 1990s

09:30 - 21 July, 2015
See How Much New York Has Changed Since the 1990s, © G.Alessandrini
© G.Alessandrini

Grégoire Alessandrini’s blog “New York City 1990’s” contains an enormous collection of images taken between 1991 and 1998 that artfully depict New York. The website is a snapshot of New York in the 1990s, capturing the spirit of the era with photographs of New York’s architecture that could only exist at that time. As politics and public sentiment have changed, the city has changed with it, and much of the New York Alessandrini captured no longer exists. 

To document just how much New York has changed in the past 25 years, we have curated a selection of Alessandrini’s images and set each photograph next to a Google Street View window corresponding to the photographer’s location at the time. In the photographs where Alessandrini observes from an elevated vantage point, the Street View images are as close as possible to the photographer’s location.  

Read on after the break to see the images of New York’s dynamic change from the 1990s to 2015. 

Create a Mini Metropolis with Sticky Page Markers

14:00 - 11 July, 2015
Create a Mini Metropolis with Sticky Page Markers, via Duncan Shotton Design Studio
via Duncan Shotton Design Studio

Building a city has never been so easy. With Duncan Shotton Design Studio's Sticky Page Markers you can create your own urban landscape, while marking the pages of your books, catalogues, or notes.

Inés Esnal’s Prism Installation Brings Vivid Colors and Optical Illusions to NYC Lobby

12:00 - 11 July, 2015
Inés Esnal’s Prism Installation Brings Vivid Colors and Optical Illusions to NYC Lobby, Courtesy of Inés Esnal
Courtesy of Inés Esnal

Artist and architect Inés Esnal’s Prism installation uses colorful elastic rope to form triangular spaces that filter light into the lobby of a new residential building in New York.

The installation's vivid colors and optical illusions provide a bold contrast to the concrete walls.

View images and learn more about the project after the break. 

Courtesy of Inés Esnal Courtesy of Inés Esnal Courtesy of Inés Esnal Courtesy of Inés Esnal +17

South Slope Townhouse / Etelamaki Architecture

11:00 - 9 July, 2015
South Slope Townhouse / Etelamaki Architecture, © Mikiko Kikuyama
© Mikiko Kikuyama
  • Architects

  • Location

    Brooklyn, NY, USA
  • Architect in Charge

    Jeff Etelamaki
  • Design Team

    Jeff Etelamaki, Mayumi Tomita, Shenier Torres,
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama +18

Echoing Green / Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design

13:00 - 7 July, 2015
Echoing Green / Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design, © Studio Dubuisson
© Studio Dubuisson

© Studio Dubuisson © Studio Dubuisson © Studio Dubuisson © Studio Dubuisson +21

David Adjaye Unveils Plans for New Studio Museum in Harlem

14:36 - 6 July, 2015
David Adjaye Unveils Plans for New Studio Museum in Harlem, via New York Times / Adjaye Associates
via New York Times / Adjaye Associates

British architect David Adjaye is set to submit plans for new Studio Museum in Harlem. Designed to replace the 47-year-old museum's existing facility on Manhattan's West 125th Street, the new $122 million proposal will more than double the museum's space, allowing it to become a premier center for contemporary artists of African descent. 

According to the New York Times, Adjaye was chosen to design the museum due to his sensitivity regarding the artists and surrounding neighborhood, which in turn inspired the project; the project's main space will feature a four-story, multi-use core marked by an "inverted stoop" that will act as an inviting "living room" and host for public programs. 

“I wanted to honor this idea of public rooms, which are soaring, celebratory and edifying — uplifting,” he told the New York Times. “Between the residential and the civic, we learned the lessons of public realms and tried to bring those two together.”

New York Hall of Science Reopens Great Hall with Renovations from Todd Schliemann

08:00 - 6 July, 2015
New York Hall of Science Reopens Great Hall with Renovations from Todd Schliemann, Opening of Connected Worlds. Image © Andrew Kelly / New York Hall of Science
Opening of Connected Worlds. Image © Andrew Kelly / New York Hall of Science

After renovations by Todd Schliemann of Ennead Architects, the New York Hall of Science’s (NYSCI) Great Hall has reopened to the public, reclaiming its place as the centerpiece of the NYSCI. Originally designed by Harrison and Abramovitz Architects, the Great Hall was the main exhibit space of the Hall of Science during the 1964-1965 World’s Fair, encapsulating visitors in an illusion of deep space with its irregular plan surrounded by undulating glass and concrete walls. Still one of the most formally interesting buildings in Queens, the Great Hall is one of the original World’s Fair’s last surviving structures and a landmark of mid-century modernism.

Cobalt Dalle-de-Verre Panels. Image © Jeff Goldberg / Esto © Jeff Goldberg / Esto Renovations in Progress. Image Courtesy of Ennead Architects Courtesy of Ennead Architects +11

The Whole Building’s a Stage in This Conceptual Cirque du Soleil Theatre Design

08:00 - 5 July, 2015
The Whole Building’s a Stage in This Conceptual Cirque du Soleil Theatre Design , Courtesy of Flying Architecture
Courtesy of Flying Architecture

A team of students from Austrian-based Studio Hani Rashid at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna have unveiled their conceptual design for a Cirque du Soleil Performance Center in Brooklyn, New York.

With its interior and exterior blended together, the entire building becomes a stage. Featuring large windows that allow the public to watch performances and training activities inside, people on each side are both viewers and viewed.

Photographer Max Touhey Gives a Rare Glimpse Inside Eero Saarinen's TWA Flight Center

12:00 - 3 July, 2015
Photographer Max Touhey Gives a Rare Glimpse Inside Eero Saarinen's TWA Flight Center, © Max Touhey for Curbed NY
© Max Touhey for Curbed NY

Currently under renovation in order to turn its soaring shell into a hotel, Eero Saarinen's iconic TWA Flight Center has been off limits to the public since 2001. However last week, while a team of digital preservationists were making scans of the swooping curves of the building's interior, photographer Max Touhey was allowed access, camera in hand, to catalog the building's mid-century elegance. The photoset, published in full on Curbed NY, shows the building in a generally good condition considering its decade-long slumber. Read on after the break for a selection of these images.

© Max Touhey for Curbed NY © Max Touhey for Curbed NY © Max Touhey for Curbed NY © Max Touhey for Curbed NY +10