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This Brazilian House Uses Different Materials as an Extension of the Surrounding Arid Landscape

14:00 - 19 March, 2017
This Brazilian House Uses Different Materials as an Extension of the Surrounding Arid Landscape , © Haruo Mikami
© Haruo Mikami

This article is part of our new series "Material in Focus", where we ask architects to share with us their creative process through the choice of materials that define important parts of the construction of their buildings.

The architecture of Casa 28 shows itself as an extension of the arid and exuberant landscape of the Cerrado. A variety of perspectives unfolds as you walk through the house. A family looking for tranquility and connection with nature commissioned this urban refuge located 10 minutes from the National Congress in Brasilia. The elements have different heights that confirm a spatial hierarchy. Extensive walls, coated with polymeric mortar, define fluid spaces and openings placed in all directions integrate cohabitating areas. We talked with architect Samuel Lamas from Equipe Lamas to learn more about the choices of materials used in the project and the influence these choices had on the design concept. Read the interview below:

© Haruo Mikami © Haruo Mikami © Haruo Mikami © Haruo Mikami +22

Learn How This Portuguese Project Was Inspired by Strong Winds and a Striking Landscape

12:00 - 29 January, 2017
Learn How This Portuguese Project Was Inspired by Strong Winds and a Striking Landscape, © Damião Santos
© Damião Santos

This article is part of our new series "Material in Focus", where we ask architects to share with us their creative process through the choice of materials that define important parts of the construction of their buildings.

This station and command post located in the Serra do Alvão, Portugal functions as a technical building supporting the wind farm. Surrounded by a unique landscape with beautiful views of the valley, the place is known for being isolated and home to a rather hostile climate, exposed to strong winds and extreme temperatures. We talked with architects Ricardo and Sofia Senos of the M2.SENOS studio to learn more about their material choices and the challenges of the project.

© Damião Santos © Damião Santos © Damião Santos © Damião Santos +17

Material Focus: Expansion Inspired by Portuguese Tiles by João Tiago Aguiar

14:00 - 17 December, 2016
Material Focus: Expansion Inspired by Portuguese Tiles by João Tiago Aguiar, © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

This article is part of our new series "Material in Focus", where we ask architects to share with us their creative process through the choice of materials that define important parts of the construction of their buildings.

Casa Restelo was designed by Portuguese studio João Tiago Aguiar - architects. The 225 square meter project consists of the expansion of a 50's residence in the Restelo neighborhood, an area of semi-detached houses. For this project they also completely renovated the exterior facades, keeping the current look in mind while creating a new interpretation of the patterns inspired by traditional Portuguese tiles. We talked with the architect João Tiago Aguiar to know more about the material choices and the challenges of this project.

Material Focus: Hacienda Niop by AS Arquitectua and R79

06:00 - 8 December, 2016
Material Focus: Hacienda Niop by AS Arquitectua and R79 , © David Cervera
© David Cervera

This article is part of our new series "Material in Focus", where we ask architects to share with us their creative process through the choice of materials that define important parts of the construction of their buildings.

Niop Hacienda from AS Arquitectura and R79 is part architectural regeneration project part historical building involving the transformation of an abandoned industrial space into high-end tourist complex in the southeast region of Mexico. A desire to maintain the original feel of the place influenced the selection of the new materials (like steel, stone, chukum, wood and glass) in order to create new spaces for public and private use that meld with the existing structure. In this interview, we talked with Roberto Ramirez from R79 who explains more about how the material choice of the project contributed to the design and construction process. 

© David Cervera © David Cervera © David Cervera © David Cervera +18

50 Impressive Details Using Wood

07:00 - 27 November, 2016
50 Impressive Details Using Wood

Over the course of history the unique characteristics of wood, which are dependent upon the species of the tree and the location in which it has grown, have enabled humanity to flourish in all parts of the globe. The architectural details of wooden construction therefore show a great diversity of meetings and joints, showing not only a project's constructive and structural logic, but also embodying the value and complexity of each project.

Take a look at these 50 construction details of projects that stand out for their clever use of wood.

15 Details of Metal Structures and Facades for Residential Projects

08:00 - 23 November, 2016
15 Details of Metal Structures and Facades for Residential Projects

The use of steel in both the past and present is mainly associated with the success of grand industrial and civic structures. But due to the commercialization and standardization of steel profiles, its use in residential projects (thanks to its mechanical properties and fast installation) has resulted in complex and interesting solutions on a domestic scale.

Dive into these 15 construction details from residential projects that have made use of steel structures and cladding. 

20 Details of Stunning Small-Scale Structures

08:00 - 17 November, 2016
20 Details of Stunning Small-Scale Structures

Throughout history, simple structures have constituted one of the most common forms of human expression. Small-scale housing, shelters, and viewpoints have been shaped by myriad materials that effectively created - depending on the techniques used - different forms of response to the same need.

Here is a compilation of 20 small-scale projects that stand out due to their small size and their simple, practical structures.

GTM Cenografia Uses Shipping Containers in Rio Olympic Pop-up Store for Nike

06:00 - 15 November, 2016

At the Rio 2016 Olympics, Studio GTM Cenografia developed a temporary installation for Nike. The space, inspired by containers and industrial sheds, occupies a total area of 600 square meters and was built in a metallic structure and wrapped in galvanized trapezoidal tiles. The cube used in the project is an installation from Brazilian artist and designer Muti Randolph, one of the pioneers of digital illustration in Brazil.

Our friends from ArchDaily Brasil talked with the architect Daltro Mendonça (GTM Cenografia) to find out more details on material choices and the execution of the project.

Watch How These South American Architects Construct a Brickless Brick Wall

06:00 - 1 November, 2016

Using concrete and bricks made of raw mud, architects Solanito Benitez, Solano Benitez, Gloria Cabral, Maria Rovea and Ricardo Sargiotti built a wall able to be constructed by the two materials working in tandem. Once the concrete dries, the bricks are washed away, returning the mud back to its natural state, leaving spaces in the lines of concrete, like a kind of negative.

This artistic intervention arose from an invitation to participate in an art exhibition in Unquillo MUVA, Cordoba, Argentina from April 11 to May 3, 2014. 

More information and images below.

Cortesía de Ricardo Sargiotti Cortesía de Ricardo Sargiotti Cortesía de Ricardo Sargiotti Cortesía de Ricardo Sargiotti +17

Material Focus: Cerrado House by Vazio S/A

06:00 - 19 October, 2016
Material Focus: Cerrado House by Vazio S/A, © Gabriel Castro
© Gabriel Castro

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get a building constructed.

The Casa no Cerrado (Cerrado House) was designed by Vazio S/A office. It was built in Moeda, Minas Gerais and, according to the architects while it seeks to explore the plasticity of basic architectural elements, the project showcases this unappreciated and threatened natural area: the Cerrado. We spoke with architect Carlos M. Teixeira to learn more about his choices of materials and the challenges of the project. 

© Gabriel Castro © Gabriel Castro © Gabriel Castro © Gabriel Castro +17

Material Focus: RPII Residence by Gustavo Arbex Architects

14:00 - 11 September, 2016
Material Focus: RPII Residence by Gustavo Arbex Architects, © Favaro Jr.
© Favaro Jr.

This article is part of our new series "Material Focus", which asks the architects to reflect on the thought process behind their choice of materials and illuminates the steps needed for constructing buildings.

The RPII Residence was designed by Gustavo Arbex Architects. The almost 1000m2 project was built in Sao Paulo. We spoke with the architect Gustavo Arbex to learn more about the choices of materials and the challenges of the project.

© Favaro Jr. © Favaro Jr. © Favaro Jr. © Favaro Jr. +37

Material Focus: Casa dos Caseiros by 24.7 Arquitetura

07:00 - 9 September, 2016
Material Focus: Casa dos Caseiros by 24.7 Arquitetura, © Pedro Kok
© Pedro Kok

This article is part of our new series "Material in Focus", where we ask architects to share with us their creative process through the choice of materials that define important parts of the construction of their buildings.

Casa dos Caseiros was designed by architectural firm 24.7. The project is 70 meters square and was a private order for a large-scale social steel framed housing project to be built in some cities in the state of Rio de Janeiro. We talked with the architect Giuliano Pelaio to learn more about material choices and challenges of the project.

Material Focus: House in Lago Sul Qi 25 by Sérgio Parada Arquitetos Associados

07:00 - 24 August, 2016
Material Focus: House in Lago Sul Qi 25 by Sérgio Parada Arquitetos Associados, © Haruo Mikami
© Haruo Mikami

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get a building constructed.

The House in Lago Sur Qi 25 was designed by  Sérgio Parada Arquitetos Associados firm. The project is 800 square meters and the layout is organized into 3 floors. Their volumes were defined by their use: intimate, service, formal and leisure. The project’s structure is completely made up of reinforced concrete with large openings that allow for complete integration of the exterior with the interior. We talked with the architect Rodrigo Biavati to learn more about the material choices and challenges of the project.

Material Focus: Casa Mipibu by Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados

08:00 - 10 August, 2016
Material Focus: Casa Mipibu by Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados, © Nelson Kon
© Nelson Kon

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

The Mipibu House, designed by Brazilian firm Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados, measures 170 square meters, and uses exposed concrete blocks to complement an expansive layout. Located in an unusually sized site in Brazil, a key element of the architects' design involved the consideration of the possible - or rather the inevitable - verticalization of nearby buildings. In response to this challenge, they designed a compact, complex design that answers the needs of their customer with creativity in the selection and use of materials. We talked with architect Danilo Terra to learn more about the choices of materials and the challenges of the project.

Material Focus: Enseada House by Arquitetura Nacional

08:00 - 4 August, 2016
Material Focus: Enseada House by Arquitetura Nacional, © Marcelo Donadussi
© Marcelo Donadussi

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

The Enseada House project was developed by the Porto Alegre office of National Architecture in 2015 and is 317 square meters with an interesting interplay between volume and materials. We talked with the architect Paula Otto, one of the designers to learn more about the material choices used in this project and the role that these choices played in the design concept.

© Marcelo Donadussi © Marcelo Donadussi © Marcelo Donadussi © Marcelo Donadussi +23

Material Focus: Salling Tower by Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter

09:30 - 31 July, 2016
Material Focus: Salling Tower by Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter, © Torben Eskerod
© Torben Eskerod

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

Installed last year, the Salling Tower provides a striking, sculptural landmark in Aarhus Docklands. From inside, its deceptively simple counterbalanced form provides a range of ways to look out over the harbor and the city - but from the outside the project's designers, Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter wanted the tower to take on an abstract appearance, referencing nautical themes with its sail-like shape and porthole-like openings all while obscuring the process of its own construction. To do this, the firm created a structure composed entirely of a single steel piece resting on top of its foundations. In this interview, project architect Noel Wibrand tells us about how the project's material choice contributed to the construction process.

© Torben Eskerod © Torben Eskerod © Torben Eskerod © Torben Eskerod +8

Material Focus: The Great Wall of WA by Luigi Rosselli

10:00 - 29 June, 2016
Material Focus: The Great Wall of WA by Luigi Rosselli ,  The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch
The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

The Great Wall of WA, designed by the Australian firm Luigi Rosselli Architects, and selected as one of Archdaily’s Best Building of the Year 2016, provides a unique example of rammed earth construction. At 230 meters in length, the Great Wall of WA is the longest structure of its kind in Australia and possibly the South Hemisphere, according to its architects. Built in remote North Western Australia, the building is made from locally available materials whose thermal properties help it to endure a variable climate. We spoke with the architect Luigi Rosselli to learn more about his compelling choice of material and the determining role it played in his concept design.

 The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch  The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch  The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch  The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch +13

Material Focus: OE House by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + Aixopluc

09:30 - 7 May, 2016
Material Focus: OE House by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + Aixopluc, © José Hevia
© José Hevia

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

In the Catalan countryside, on the outskirts of the small town of Alforja, sits an incongruous sight: among the scattered stone masia houses is a structure of steel and glass, a resolutely rectilinear box among the traditional housing forms. But once inside the OE House, designed by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism and Aixopluc, one realizes that the building is not so different to its neighbors after all: on the upper floor, the roof incorporates a system of ceramic vaults taken almost directly from traditional vernacular design. This feature then combines with plywood and OSB to create a truly eclectic material pallette. We spoke with the design's architects, David Tapias of Aixopluc and Cristina Goberna and Urtzi Grau of Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, to find out what lay behind these unusual material choices.