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Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.

Outside In: The Architecture of Smith and Williams; Wayne Williams (1919–2007) and Whitney Smith (1911–2002), Smith and Williams Community Facilities Planners office (South Pasadena, Calif.), 1958; Photograph by Jocelyn Gibbs, 2012
Outside In: The Architecture of Smith and Williams; Wayne Williams (1919–2007) and Whitney Smith (1911–2002), Smith and Williams Community Facilities Planners office (South Pasadena, Calif.), 1958; Photograph by Jocelyn Gibbs, 2012

The Getty Trust is partnering with Pacific Standard Time to present 11 individual exhibitions throughout LA's museums that will explore the history and heritage of the city's modern architecture and its influential designers.  As musician, photographer and architectural blogger Moby boasts that "LA has the most diverse architecture of any city on the planet".  Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in LA will explore this diversity that covers post World War II architecture through today through specific  points of view ranging in architectural style, influence and decade.  The exhibitions, which will run from April through July 2013, are a follow-up to last year's Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA, 1945-1980. The focus of the exhibitions will range in scale and cover the monumental and everyday architectural moments that make LA unique.  Exhibitions will present iconic modernist homes and cultural landmarks as well as coffee shops, car washes, and the freeways in addition to  the un-built architectural fantasies of modernism and post-modernism.  

On-Site Office Trailers: Invisible Architecture of the Urban Environment; On-site Office Trailer, 2012; CLUI Photo Archive, 2012 © The Center for Land Use Interpretation Pasadena 1940 Forward: Residential Architecture of the Recent Past; John Gougeon; The exterior and bell tower at Pasadena Presbyterian Church, Pasadena, California; © Copyright, Pasadena Presbyterian Church Outside In: The Architecture of Smith and Williams; Wayne Williams (1919–2007) and Whitney Smith (1911–2002), 3.Shoreline House for Orange County Home Show, Costa Mesa, California, 1957; Photograph by Jocelyn Gibbs, 2012 of a drawing by Al Spencer © Regents of the University of California Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future, 1940–1990; Julius Shulman (American, 1910–2009) Department of Water and Power Building Corner with Fountains, 1965 © J. Paul Getty Trust. Used with permission. Julius Shulman Photography Archive, Research Library at the Getty Research Institute

Follow us after the break for the eleven exhibitions that will be part of PST's event.

'A Confederacy of Heretics: The Architecture Gallery, Venice, 1979' Exhibition

Seven of the architects who participated in The Architecture Gallery, from left to right: Frederick Fisher, Robert Mangurian, Eric Owen Moss, Coy Howard, Craig Hodgetts, Thom Mayne, Frank Gehry. Photograph ©1980 Ave Pildas.
Seven of the architects who participated in The Architecture Gallery, from left to right: Frederick Fisher, Robert Mangurian, Eric Owen Moss, Coy Howard, Craig Hodgetts, Thom Mayne, Frank Gehry. Photograph ©1980 Ave Pildas.

Taking place at SCI-Arc‘s campus in downtown Los Angeles March 29-July 7, Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.: A Confederacy of Heretics: The Architecture Gallery, Venice, 1979 exhibition. The exhibition examines the pivotal role played by the temporary gallery held in the home of architect Thom Mayne for several weeks in 1979. An immersive showcase of spectacular models, drawings and media will be mounted in two spaces located on the SCI-Arc campus, the main gallery and the Kappe Library Gallery. More information on the exhibition after the break.

Oyler/Wu Lecture & Gow + Karlsson Exhibition Opening Reception

Two key events are coming up at SCI-Arc this month starting with the ‘Dwayne Oyler & Jenny Wu: Lineworks’ lecture which takes place tomorrow, January 16, at the W.M. Keck Lecture Hall at 7pm PST. Established in Los Angeles in 2004, Oyler Wu Collaborative, ‘has utilized the last five years to establish a way of working that is committed to experimentation through a relentless hands-on approach to our work’. Also, starting January 18 until March 3, the ‘Marcelyn Gow + Ulrika Karlsson: AQUEOTROPE’ exhibition focuses on materializing the mathematical, the exact translation of virtual instructions in the form of drawings or codes to their material actualization, is a fundamental procedure in the production of architecture. For more information on the events, please visit here.

West Los Angeles Office Building Proposal / GMPA Architects

Located on a prominent corner in West Los Angeles, the proposal for an office building by GMPA Architects is an energized, swirling 4-level structure rather than a static wedding cake style. With its riveting spiral shape,, derived from the 10’ difference in elevation, the dynamic, multi-shaped levels add visual interest and reinforce a connection to the street. More images and architects’ description after the break.

New United States Courthouse Competition Entry / NBBJ

North © NBBJ
North © NBBJ

Claiming to be the most progressive, sustainable, and cost effective courthouse in the nation, NBBJ’s shortlisted proposal for the New Los Angeles Federal Courthouse serves as a model for future GSA development. The contrast between the free and informal spirit of Los Angeles with the formal structure and societal role of the Federal Courts illustrates an important duality that openly coexists throughout their phased design. At a larger scale, the structure becomes a mediator within the skyline, rising to a comfortable 256 feet tall to help transition the steep, urban high-rise topography of Bunker Hill and the mid-rise, ordered context of downtown. Read the architects’ description after the break to learn more about this high performance, multifaceted design.

New United States Courthouse Competition Entry / Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design

Courtesy of  Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design
Courtesy of Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design

Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design and Gruen Associates have shared with us their second place proposal for the highly anticipated design-build competition for the new United States courthouse in Los Angeles, California. Envisioned as an icon within the city skyline, the triangular monolith provides a sustainable, 21st century courthouse that embodies the democratic qualities of dignity, stature, transparency, openness and accessibility. Located at a pivotal node connecting the Los Angeles Civic Center, the Broadway Historic District and Bunker Hill, the 550,000 square foot courthouse is surrounded by a lush civic space that plays an important role in the existing cityscape. Read the architect’s description after the break…

Never Built: Los Angeles

New United States Courthouse Competition Entry / McCarthy, Brooks + Scarpa, and HMC Architects

Courtesy of McCarthy, Brooks + Scarpa, and HMC Architects
Courtesy of McCarthy, Brooks + Scarpa, and HMC Architects

The McCarthy, Brooks + Scarpa, and HMC Architects team just released their proposal for the Design Excellence/design-build competition for new United States courthouse in Los Angeles. Selected to compete thru the General Services Administration two-stage Design Excellence Program, the team is challenged with the approximately 550,000 sq. ft. high-rise building located at 1st and Hill Street. Aiming to be certified LEED Patinum, the design delivers functional efficiency, security, and accessibility for the Court, the U.S. Marshal Service, and the other tenants and users. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Mandeville Canyon Residence / Griffin Enright Architects

  • Architects: Griffin Enright Architects
  • Location: Los Angeles, California, USA
  • Architects in Charge: John Enright, Margaret Griffin
  • Area: 427.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Tim Street-Porter

Courtesy of Tim Street-Porter Courtesy of Tim Street-Porter Courtesy of Tim Street-Porter Courtesy of Tim Street-Porter

SOM Wins Bid to Design Los Angeles Federal Courthouse

The GSA has announced that Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill have been selected as the architects of the new Los Angeles Federal Courthouse, which will house the U.S. District Court, Central District of California, and the U.S. Marshals Service. The architects beat out 3 other shortlisted teams to win the $318 million project.

According to the GSA, "The new 550,000-square-foot building will be a sustainable, cost-effective, state-of-the-art court facility that includes security upgrades that are not available in the current 312 North Spring Street courthouse."

The site, located at 107 South Broadway (down the street from Morphosis’ Caltrans building, LA’s City Hall, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall) has been dormant since 2007; although a $1.1 billion design by Perkins + Will was selected soon after, it was abandoned when Congress slashed the GSA's construction budget. The GSA considers the approval of the new redevelopment plan a "major milestone."

More info and images, after the break...

Bloom House / Greg Lynn

  • Architects: Greg Lynn
  • Location: Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Design Team: Jackilin Bloom, Brittney Hart, Chris Kabatsi, Brian Ha, Danny Bazil, Andreas Krainer
  • Architect of Record: Lookinglass Architecture & Design
  • Structural Engineer: KPFF Consulting Engineers
  • Mechanical Engineer: Storms & Lowe
  • Electrical Engineer: Storms & Lowe
  • Cost Estimator: Oliver Garrett Construction
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Richard Powers

© Richard Powers © Richard Powers © Richard Powers © Richard Powers

St. Thomas the Apostle School / Griffin Enright Architects

  • Architects: Griffin Enright Architects
  • Location: Los Angeles, California, USA
  • Architects in Charge: John Enright, Margaret Griffin
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Benny Chan

© Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan © Benny Chan

Dr. York / DCPP Architects

The project is located in Los Angeles California, USA, The property is found at street level in a commercial area, on a street where there are mostly shops with a lot of traffic of cars and pedestrian. The main idea was to introduce some of that public space turning into the store in an extension of the street.

Video: Googie Architecture, Part 2

LA's Millennium Hollywood Project

Millennium Hollywood Project via Millennium Partners
Millennium Hollywood Project via Millennium Partners

Millennium Partners and Argent Ventures are moving forward with their plan to transform 4.47 acres of vacant parking lots surrounding Hollywood’s iconic, mid-century Capitol Records Building into a transit-oriented, mixed-use development. Located on the famous intersection of Hollywood and Vine, the Millennium Hollywood Project will feature two residential buildings reaching heights up to 585 feet, designed by Handel Architects, that are grounded by a High Line-inspired public space by James Corner Field Operations. With the Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) currently on public review, the New York-based developers are hoping to get city approvals underway in early 2013. Continue reading to learn more…

HNTB's winning concept for LA's 6th Street Viaduct Replacement Project

HNTB winning proposal via Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project
HNTB winning proposal via Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project

In April, Mayor Villaraigosa and City Council Member Huizar announced an international design competition to redesign the historic, 80-year-old Sixth Street Bridge in Los Angeles. The decision to launch the competition came after engineers warned that the bridge was at risk of failing during a major earthquake due to a degenerative structural problem known as “concrete cancer”. After careful consideration and entertaining the idea of constructing a replica of the 1932 icon, the city committed to moving forward with a major redesign. In mid-October, the national infrastructure firm HNTB, along with team members Michael Maltzan Architecture and AC Martin Partners, were announced as winners of the international competition. Continue reading to learn more…

Video: Googie Architecture, Part 1

Centerstage: SCI-Arc Graduation Pavilion / Oyler Wu Collaborative

Oyler Wu Collaborative was once again asked to design the architecture for SCI-Arc‘s graduation ceremony along with other faculty members. The challenge included rethinking the event of the ceremony while keeping the existing pavilion they had previously designed. Essentially, the challenge called for making the existing pavilion new again. Their stage operates as a hybrid of different elements, incorporating into it a large stage with a central podium, seating that is configured much like a bleacher, and a cantilevered shade canopy. While the center of the actual stage is in alignment with the center of the existing pavilion, the overall structure is positioned asymmetrically, with the bleacher and canopy located off axis. More images and architects’ description after the break.