Tom Bradley International Terminal / Fentress Architects

01:00 - 7 November, 2013
Tom Bradley International Terminal / Fentress Architects, © Fentress Architects
© Fentress Architects

© Fentress Architects © Jason A. Knowles © Jason A. Knowles © Jason A. Knowles +11

Architects Tackle LA's Water Scarcity

00:00 - 3 November, 2013
Arid Land Institute Geo-spatial Model. Image © Arid Land Institute
Arid Land Institute Geo-spatial Model. Image © Arid Land Institute

Water scarcity is a profound challenge for designers of the built environment. Beyond looking for water sources and creating sustainable ecosystems, how can we begin to create cities and buildings that will help us to celebrate and mitigate hydro-logical concerns? Hadley and Peter Arnold, co-directors of the Arid Land Institute (ALI) at Woodbury University, have decided to tackle this problem around Los Angeles. With the support of the World Water Forum and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, they recently developed a high-resolution geospatial model to strategically identify and quantify the potential for improving storm water capture within urban areas. 

How Would You Design Grand Avenue?

00:00 - 23 October, 2013
How Would You Design Grand Avenue?, Related Cos. rendering of a conceptual plan for a retail and residential complex across Grand Avenue. Image Courtesy of Related Cos., via LA Times
Related Cos. rendering of a conceptual plan for a retail and residential complex across Grand Avenue. Image Courtesy of Related Cos., via LA Times

"Will Grand Avenue finally turn around? Most likely not until they make it a two-way, add more trees, bike lanes, and pedestrian amenities. Buildings alone can’t do it, no matter how daring, novel (or expensive) the architecture." -- Guy Horton, The Indicator, "Ten Years Later, Has the Disney Concert Hall Made a Difference?"

The latest controversy surrounding the Grand Avenue re-design, the long-awaited project to develop the stretch of land east of the Walt Disney Concert Hall, is the re-instatement of Frank Gehry, a move which occurred after the city of LA rejected plans from mega-developers Related Cos. (designed by Gensler in collaboration with Robert A.M. Stern) for being "overly commercial."

Of course, while the Related Cos. plans may have failed to wow the city, the decision to bring Gehry back to the project hasn't exactly been embraced either. A must-see article in Zócalo Public Square asks four urban planning experts, "what would you do with Grand Avenue?" In his latest ArchDaily column, Guy Horton offers his opinion: any re-design must rely on activating life on the street-level, rather than on one architectural solution. Well, ArchDaily readers, now we'd like to know your thoughts on the matter.

AD Classics: Walt Disney Concert Hall / Frank Gehry

01:00 - 23 October, 2013
AD Classics: Walt Disney Concert Hall / Frank Gehry, © Gehry Partners, LLP
© Gehry Partners, LLP

Completed October 23, 2003, The Walt Disney Concert Hall celebrates its tenth anniversary today. Home to the LA Philharmonic, it has received wide acclaim for its excellent acoustics and distinctive architecture. In the decade since its opening, the hall's sweeping, metallic surfaces have become associated with Frank Gehry’s signature style.

© 2012 Carlos Eduardo Seo - www.carlosseo.com. Used with permission. © Matt Blanchard © Gehry Partners, LLP © 2012 Carlos Eduardo Seo - www.carlosseo.com. Used with permission. +26

Solar Decathlon 2013: SCI-Arc & Caltech Create California-style, Zero Net Energy Bungalow

01:00 - 22 October, 2013
Solar Decathlon 2013: SCI-Arc & Caltech Create California-style, Zero Net Energy Bungalow, © Paolo Tadoc / SCI-Arc
© Paolo Tadoc / SCI-Arc

DALE, short for Dynamic Augmented Living Environment, is this year's U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon entry for the SCI-Arc/Caltech team. Made of two movable, prefabricated modules that open to allow the outdoors in, DALE celebrates the active California lifestyle through its dynamic architecture.

DALE learns from two classic California precedents: the super-sized suburban tract home and the compact, sufficient bungalow; amending one and expanding on the other to become a new Southern California typology. At 600 square feet, it is a micro house with an unprecedented flexible interior that results in the program of a house three times the size.

The Indicator: Ten Years Later, Has the Disney Concert Hall Made a Difference?

00:00 - 18 October, 2013
The Indicator: Ten Years Later, Has the Disney Concert Hall Made a Difference? , Courtesy of shutterstock.com
Courtesy of shutterstock.com

On October 23rd, the Walt Disney concert hall, the project that almost never was, will celebrate its ten-year anniversary. Throughout these ten years it has had all manner of transformative power attributed to it. But has it really transformed LA? What would the city have been like if it had never been built? Would it be fundamentally different? 

The answer? No.The city wouldn’t even be that different in the immediate vicinity of Grand Avenue. 

Gelb House / Bruce Norelius Studio

01:00 - 11 October, 2013
Gelb House / Bruce Norelius Studio, Courtesy of Bruce Norelius Studio
Courtesy of Bruce Norelius Studio
  • Architects

  • Location

    Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • Builder

    Glynn Design Build
  • Kitchen Cabinet Pulls

    Tom KundigCollection : Earless Cabinet Pull
  • Lighting

    Birchwood Kelsey LED
  • Area

    1200.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of Bruce Norelius Studio

Courtesy of Bruce Norelius Studio Courtesy of Bruce Norelius Studio Courtesy of Bruce Norelius Studio Courtesy of Bruce Norelius Studio +13

Global Citizen: The Architecture of Moshe Safdie

00:00 - 8 October, 2013
Global Citizen: The Architecture of Moshe Safdie

Journey through a three-dimensional landscape of striking architecture in this career-spanning exhibition of Moshe Safdie’s work. Global Citizen: The Architecture of Moshe Safdie surveys the renowned architect’s career from his formative period in the 1960s and early 1970s to his recent projects around the world, exploring his aesthetic language of transcendent light, powerful geometry, and iconic forms. 

Westgate Residence / Kurt Krueger Architect

01:00 - 29 September, 2013
Westgate Residence / Kurt Krueger Architect, © Unlimited Style Photography
© Unlimited Style Photography

© Unlimited Style Photography © Unlimited Style Photography © Unlimited Style Photography © Unlimited Style Photography +25

Kearsarge Residence / Kurt Krueger Architect

01:00 - 26 September, 2013
Kearsarge Residence / Kurt Krueger Architect, © Unlimited Style Photography
© Unlimited Style Photography

© Unlimited Style Photography © Unlimited Style Photography © Unlimited Style Photography © Unlimited Style Photography +27

Gehry's Walt Disney Hall Turns 10

00:00 - 25 September, 2013
Gehry's Walt Disney Hall Turns 10, © Archdaily
© Archdaily

It's been called a "remarkable work of public architecture" that "engages [the city of] Los Angeles" like few others. With the 10 year anniversary of Frank Gehry's Walt Disney Concert Hall approaching, the LA Times, with some great, in-depth coverage, has been taking a look back at its architecture and what makes it such an important icon for both Gehry and LA. Oh, and don't forget to check out its soon-to-be neighbor on Grand Avenue, the Broad Museum by Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Same Time Zone, Different Standards

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
Same Time Zone, Different Standards, Foreground: Pavilion by Tom Wiscombe Design, Middleground: Textile Room Pavilion by P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S at The Museum of Contemparary Art, Los Angeles. Image © Taiyo Watanabe
Foreground: Pavilion by Tom Wiscombe Design, Middleground: Textile Room Pavilion by P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S at The Museum of Contemparary Art, Los Angeles. Image © Taiyo Watanabe

The Getty’s Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. hosted A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living at UCLA’s Hammer Museum and Contemporary Architecture from Southern California (formerly known as A New Sculpturalism) at MOCA Geffen for the better part of this summer. These two exhibits, on view until September 8 and 16 respectively, give us insight into Los Angeles’ past and present architectural legacies. They take on fundamentally different challenges. One uncovers a prolific and primary history of a modernist architect, the other attempts to capture and catalogue an unwieldy and unstable present.

Read on after the break for reviews of both exhibitions...

Tempera Pavilion by Atelier Manferdini at The Museum Of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Image © Taiyo Watanabe Drawdle 01-03, 2012-13 by Morphosis Architects at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Image © Taiyo Watanabe Exhibition of A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living at UCLA Hammer Museum. Image © Brian Forrest A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects.  Fairhaven Tract Eichler Homes Model LJ-124, Orange, California, 1961. Image © Jason Schmidt +10

The Threat Hanging Over LA's Modernist Homes

00:00 - 23 August, 2013
The Threat Hanging Over LA's Modernist Homes, Richard Neutra's 1929 Lovell House. Image Courtesy of Wikiarquitectura
Richard Neutra's 1929 Lovell House. Image Courtesy of Wikiarquitectura

A shadow hangs over the hills of Los Angeles, threatening its modernist architecture. In this article on the Daily Beast, Andrew Romano investigates the trend for the 'McMansions' which are now popular among LA's super-rich, and the risk that they pose to the style that "many believe was perfected in Southern California" - the hillside modernist home. But it's not all bad news: he finds that the Schairer House, designed by Gregory Ain in 1949 is now being restored, and Beverly Hills last year past its first preservation laws. Read the full article here.

LA’s Iconic Case Study Houses (Finally!) Make National Register

00:00 - 22 August, 2013
LA’s Iconic Case Study Houses (Finally!) Make National Register, Case Study House #22, (playboy), 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect © Julius Shulman
Case Study House #22, (playboy), 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect © Julius Shulman

Ten of Los Angeles’ Case Study Homes have been deemed historically significant an worthy of being included on US’s National Register of Historic Places. Despite the Los Angeles Conservancy’s belief that all of them deserve “equal preservation protections,” the 11th home was not included due to “owner objection.”

The Case Study Houses spawned from a post-WWII residential experiment, presented by the Arts & Architecture magazine in 1945, which introduced modern movement ideas for affordable and efficient housing. The homes - designed by the likes of Richard Neutra, Charles and Ray Eames, Pierre Koenig, Eero Saarinen and others - redefined the modern home. And, with the help of Julius Shulman, placed Los Angeles as an epicenter for mid-century modernism. 

The 11 homes included on the register are:

Petersen Automotive Museum Unveils Eye-Catching New Exterior by Kohn Pedersen Fox

00:00 - 22 August, 2013
Petersen Automotive Museum Unveils Eye-Catching New Exterior by Kohn Pedersen Fox, Courtesy of Petersen Automotive Museum
Courtesy of Petersen Automotive Museum

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles has announced that it will celebrate its 20th anniversary in 2014 with a redesign of its interior and a complete transformation of its exterior facade to create a "world class museum that will showcase the art, experience, culture and heritage of the automobile." The exterior design by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates will give the Petersen a truly unique and iconic look that will hopefully attract architecture and car enthusiasts alike.

More on the museum's drastic transformation after the break.

P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S' Latest Expressive, Experimental Pavilion: Textile Room

00:00 - 16 August, 2013
P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S' Latest Expressive, Experimental Pavilion: Textile Room

This article originally appeared in Metropolis Magazine's Point of View Blog as "Working at the Crystalline Level."

Los Angeles-based P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S is among the most intriguing and progressive firms working in architecture today. They seem relentless in pushing boundaries in areas like ultra-light-weight high-tech materials and immersive media. They are also very thoughtful and patient in the way they approach design.

This is good because what they are engaged in and the way they work takes time. By collaborating with engineers and innovators in different industries they are slowly changing the way architecture is carried out and conceived on material and ontological levels. They don’t do spec homes, they do what’s new, and sometimes try to do what hasn’t been done yet.

Founder and co-principal Marcelo Spina and co-principal Georgina Huljich both teach, he at SCI-ARC and she at UCLA, where they pursue research interests with students and then reflect that back into their small but energetic practice tucked away in one of Los Angeles’ rustic urban edges, Atwater Village.

One thing to recently emerge from this office is the experimental carbon fiber pavilion they call Textile Room.

SOM Breaks Ground on Los Angeles' Courthouse

00:00 - 15 August, 2013
SOM Breaks Ground on Los Angeles' Courthouse, © SOM
© SOM

Just eight months after being awarded the design-build contract with Clark Construction Group, Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill (SOM) has broke ground on the new, $318 million United States Courthouse in downtown Los Angeles. This is a long-awaited achievement for the city of Los Angeles, as attempts have been made to construct a new courthouse since 2007. However, despite having to abandoned a $1.1 billion Perkins + Will proposal years ago, many believe this sustainable and more cost-effective design by SOM was worth the wait. 

The Indicator: Two Shows, Many Cities: “A New Scuplturalism” at MOCA and “Never Built” at the A+D Museum

00:00 - 9 August, 2013
The Indicator: Two Shows, Many Cities: “A New Scuplturalism” at MOCA and “Never Built” at the A+D Museum, Pereira and Luckman, LAX original plan, 1952, Rendering. Courtesy Los Angeles World Airports Flight Path Learning Center.
Pereira and Luckman, LAX original plan, 1952, Rendering. Courtesy Los Angeles World Airports Flight Path Learning Center.

Here in Los Angeles we have a complicated relationship with architecture and two con-current museum exhibitions demonstrate this in ironic and puzzling ways. This came into clear relief when, on Saturday, August 03, 2013, something amazing and unprecedented happened: architecture was on the front page of a major US newspaper, the Los Angeles Times

This, it must be said, is a very unusual thing for architecture. Moreover, it was not the type of architecture you might expect to grab the spotlight. It was the un-built original plan for Los Angeles International Airport by Pereira and Luckman, c. 1952. If you’ve been to LAX you’ve seen their Theme Building. They also did the plan for LAX that was finally accepted—the less visionary, less ambitious plan. This was being re-presented to the world in the context of “Never Built” a show about the unrealized architectural dreams of Los Angeles currently showing at the A+D Museum.