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Deborah Berke Tapped to Design Cummins' Indianapolis Headquarters

New York-based Deborah Berke Partners has been selected to design a $30 million headquarters for Indiana-based diesel engine manufacture Cummins. Planned for downtown Indianapolis on the former four-acre site of Market Square Arena, the project will provide office space for up to 400 employees, as well as ground-floor retail, parking and public green space. Berke was chosen over SHoP Architects and Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects. 

Roche Diagnostics Training Center / SOM

Aiming to provide a new gateway and identity, the two-story, 87,135-square-feet Roche Diagnostics Training Center re-imagines their Indianapolis campus. Designed by SOM, the project just broke ground as it begins to establish a new and consistent brand identity for the Swiss-based pharmaceutical company. The new building’s clean, modern aesthetic embodies Roche’s corporate architectural philosophy and is informed by a 100 year legacy of European design precedents. More images and architects’ description after the break.

AIA Ranks Columbus, Indiana as US's 6th Most Architecturally Important City

The 166-foot high campanile, or free-standing bell tower, of The First Christian Church, designed by architect Eliel Saarinen, in Columbus, Indiana. Completed in 1942, it was the first contemporary building in Columbus and one of the first churches of contemporary architecture in the United States. Photo via Flickr User CC clarkmaxwell
The 166-foot high campanile, or free-standing bell tower, of The First Christian Church, designed by architect Eliel Saarinen, in Columbus, Indiana. Completed in 1942, it was the first contemporary building in Columbus and one of the first churches of contemporary architecture in the United States. Photo via Flickr User CC clarkmaxwell

New York, San Fran, Chicago…Columbus, Indiana. Which of these doesn’t go with the others? Well, according to the AIA, none. Columbus, Indiana, a small town of about 44,000 has been ranked by the AIA as the nation’s 6th most architecturally important city, right after Washington DC. So what’s so special about Columbus? Apparently, a 1950s philanthropist by the name of J. Irwin Miller took it upon himself to foot the bill for any new public building in the city. The result? Today, Columbus has more than 70 buildings designed by internationally renowned architects – including I.M. Pei, Eliel Saarinen, Eero Saarinen, Richard Meier and Harry Weese. Check out a Video on Columbus “The Athens of the Prairie,” after the break…

Event: Michael Graves to lecture at Notre Dame

If you’re in the South Bend, Indiana, area, mark your calendars! A week from today, the famed architect and designer Michael Graves will present his lecture “A Grand Tour” at the University of Notre Dame. The lecture will recount his journey, once considered obligatory for a young architect, exploring the great monuments of Europe. As a recipient of the prestigious Prix de Rome, Graves traveled through Italy, Greece, Turkey, Spain, England, Germany, and France, studying and recording the masterworks of both ancient and modern architecture. This year, the University of Notre Dame awarded Graves with the Richard H. Driehaus Prize, honoring his lifetime contributions to classical and traditional architecture in the modern world. Read all about his nomination here and watch an exclusive ArchDaily interview with the legend here.

'Riley Sunrise' Installation for Riley Hospital for Children / PROJECTiONE

With the Simon Family Tower addition still under construction at the Riley Hospital for Children, the installation for hospital is complete, after over a year in the making. Designed by PROJECTiONE, ‘Riley Sunrise’ was designed with the hope that the super-graphics can serve as a pleasant distraction for visitors of the hospital and lead to discussions that can re-focus a conversation towards something positive and uplifting. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Super Bowl XLVI / Lucas Oil Stadium

Courtesy of HKS
Courtesy of HKS

Don’t forget to check out the building today when Super Bowl XLVI kicks off at Lucas Oil Stadium in the heart of downtown Indianapolis. HKS repeats as designer for two consecutive Super Bowl venues, immediately following the Super Bowl debut at HKS-designed Cowboys Stadium in Dallas in 2011. The 1.8 million-square-foot sports and entertainment venue has normal capacity of 63,000 for Indianapolis Colts Football, but will expand to approximately 70,000 for the 2012 Super Bowl. The stadium and surrounding site will be transformed to incorporate game-day fan plazas, sponsorship zones, media broadcast areas, fan interactive zones and tailgating. The economic impact to the host city is estimated at $300 million to $400 million. Mark A. Williams, AIA, principal for HKS Sports & Entertainment Group, said, “We are proud to have created the venues selected for the world’s preeminent sporting event. While very different in their designs, Lucas Oil Stadium and last year’s host, Cowboy Stadium, both provide a setting that immeasurably enhances fan enjoyment and contributes to the success of this momentous event.” Continue reading to learn more about the 2012 Super Bowl venue.

Courtesy of HKS Courtesy of HKS Courtesy of HKS Courtesy of HKS

Ball State University, College of Architecture and Planning 2011 Gresham Smith Design Competition Winners

Courtesy of Colin Marshall, Matthew Nichols - Team Award of Excellence
Courtesy of Colin Marshall, Matthew Nichols - Team Award of Excellence

Through the Gresham Smith Competition (an annual program sponsored by Gresham Smith and Partners), the Ball State University, College of Architecture and Planning, Department of Architecture, with support from the College of Architecture and Planning, Indianapolis Center (CAP: IC) has offered to assist the Julia Carson Legacy of Love Foundation in consolidating the objectives of its mission to realize the Julia Carson Community Center by facilitating community participatory engagement through a programmatic and conceptual design competition. More about the project and competition winners after the break.

Thesis = Business: PROJECTiONE

© PROJECTiONE
© PROJECTiONE

Recent graduates of the Masters program at Ball State University’s College of Architecture and Planning, Adam Buente and Kyle Perry have spent the last couple years developing their unique interests and ideas into a business of their own. Working with fellow students Elizabeth Boone and Eric Brockmeyer, they began a collaborative graduate thesis project focused on exploring the possibilities of design and fabrication via digital equipment as a business platform. After their first year out of school they have begun to independently manage their Indiana based company. PROJECTiONE recently produced the ACADIA competition winner HYPERLAXITY and boast other projects such as EXOtique, bitMAPS, and Radiance. Words and images from the PROJECTiONE team after the break.

Chop Stick / Visiondivision

© Visiondivision
© Visiondivision

Architecture City Guide: Indianapolis

Courtesy of Wikimedia
Courtesy of Wikimedia

This week, with the help of our readers, we visited Indianapolis for our Architecture City Guide. Our readers suggested a lot of really nice buildings and we greatly appreciate their help. Indianapolis’s numerous sporting events and conventions continually draw crowds to this industrious state capital throughout the year. It is only fitting that there is an architecture city guide for its various contemporary buildings. As a seat of government and industry, Indianapolis also boasts a nice variety of historic architecture that is worth seeing. Take a look at the list our readers help put together and add your favorites to the comment section below. The Architecture City Guide: Indianapolis list and corresponding map after the break.

Median Berms / Endemic Architecture

Courtesy Endemic Architecture
Courtesy Endemic Architecture

Clark Thenhaus, of Endemic Architecture has shared with Arch Daily his design for a gateway to the Indianapolis Art Center. While the project has been canceled, we felt the design was still worth sharing to our readers. Follow after the break for additional renderings, diagrams and a description from the architect.

Light Screen Installation

Courtesy of Gray Architecture
Courtesy of Gray Architecture

The Light Screen is a site specific installation located in a walnut grove at Fort Benjamin Harrison State Park in Indianapolis. The proposed project was a finalist in the “Great Ideas” competition sponsored by the Arts Council of Indianapolis, and builds on an architectural installation previously completed by the entrant in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 2006 – Light Sail (selected images of which are also included here).  More about this installation following the break. Architects: Timothy Gray of Gray Architecture with Kurt West, Melli Hoppe Location: Walnut Grove, Ft. Benjamin Harrison State Park, Indianapolis, Indiana Design Team / Collaborators: Timothy Gray, Kurt West, Melli Hoppe (Light Screen); Timothy Gray, Lina Ali, Kirsten Bremmer, Andrew Cranford; Guy Fimmers; April Hiebert; Luc Johnston; Lauren Macaulay; Michelle Poon; Adam Read; Lauren Staples, FreeLAB 2006 (Light Sail) Model and renderings: Kurt West Photographs: Timothy Gray, Ken Cam, Guy Fimmers, Luc Johnston

Salvaged Layers; A Collaborative Site Specific Performance

tensioned layers
tensioned layers

Salvaged Layers; a Collaborative Site Specific Performance project was an interdisciplinary collaboration between two groups of students from separate Universities.  The studio challenged students to explore issues of craft, making and place through a series of full scale built interventions in a historic Indianapolis theatre which had been gutted in anticipation of a planned renovation. The raw state of the theatre’s interior gave students a rich and evocative palette to engage while simultaneously liberating them from the conventional notions of stage and audience.

Courtesy of Butler Theatre Courtesy of Gray Architecture © Greg Hittler Courtesy of Gray Architecture

Architects: Students of Ball State University Department of Architecture; Faculty Coordinator Timothy Gray, Gray Architecture Location: 5505 E Washington Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA Project Team: Mark Vanden Akker, Austin Lucari, Jay Weeks, Brad Wanek, Veronica Eulacivo, Eric Jenson, Michael Neizer, Paul Reynolds, Greg Hittler, Luke Haas, Ben Greenberg; (Butler University) Jacqueline Vouga, Jeff Irlbeck, Jill Harman, Amanda Lynn Meyer, Amanda Miller, Joe Esbenshade, Chris Ziegler, Jessica Conger, Steph Gray, and Butler University Faculty Coordinator Melli Hoppe Client: Dale Harkin, Irving Theatre Project Year: 2010 Photographs: Greg Hittler, Courtesy of Gray Architecture

Straw Bale Eco Center / Students of Ball State University Department of Architecture

Courtesy of Gray Architecture
Courtesy of Gray Architecture

Located on an 80 acre field station on the prairie of Muncie, Indiana the Straw Bale Eco Center was a community project between Ball State University Department of Architecture students, professors, building professionals, elementary school students and the general public. The classroom and ecology center was a project of complete collaboration, resulting in immersion learning, education outreach and research initiatives, it is the first carbon neutral load bearing straw bale public building in the region. The Straw Bale Eco Center was awarded the 2008 Merit Award for Excellence in Architectural Design by AIA Indiana, 2008 Alternative Power and Energy Award, 2008 Accent on Architecture Award, and 2007 Green Building Initiative Award. More photographs and drawings following the break.

Courtesy of Gray Architecture Courtesy of Gray Architecture Courtesy of Gray Architecture Courtesy of Gray Architecture

Architects: Students of Ball State University Department of Architecture; Faculty Coordinator Timothy Gray, Gray Architecture Location: 5800 Bethel Avenue Muncie, Indiana Client: Field Station Oversight Committee, Ball State University Project Area: 500 sqf Project Year: 2008-2009 Photographs: Courtesy of Gray Architecture Drawings: Dan Bajor