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"Death in Venice" to Showcase Architecture's Relationship with Mortality

00:00 - 27 April, 2014
"Death in Venice" to Showcase Architecture's Relationship with Mortality, Death in Venice will focus partially on the changing design of hospitals, places that many people die in every year. Image Courtesy of The Wellcome Library
Death in Venice will focus partially on the changing design of hospitals, places that many people die in every year. Image Courtesy of The Wellcome Library

This year’s Venice Architecture Biennale focuses on the fundamentals of architecture, and the theme of "absorbing modernity." Official exhibitions will highlight the basics of modern building, but one exhibition (unaffiliated with the official biennale) will take a unique approach to the term. Architects Alison Killing and Ania Molenda will devote their installation to the most fundamental quality of all: death.

Titled Death in Venice, this presentation will focus on how architecture has facilitated the act of dying during the past 100 years. All of the funding for the exhibition materials has been provided by the Fund for Creative Industries NL, but to transport the show to Venice, Killing and Molenda have started a Kickstarter campaign.

VIDEO: Paris in Motion

00:00 - 27 April, 2014

In this four-part, stop-motion series, Mayeul Akpovi presents a new perspective on the City of Lights. Filmed with manual camera movements and composed of more than 30,000 photographs, the videos enable a unique, otherwise-unattainable experience of Paris’ sleepless urban spaces by ceaselessly attenuating the passage of time. 

Watch part one (above), and continue after the break for the remaining series...

Tammo Prinz Architects Propose Platonian Tower in Lima

01:00 - 27 April, 2014
Tammo Prinz Architects Propose Platonian Tower in Lima, © Tammo Prinz Architects
© Tammo Prinz Architects

Tammo Prinz's competition entry for a new residential tower in Lima, Peru, proposes the use of platonian bodies to generate dramatic interior and exterior spaces.

The concrete dodekaeder structure drives the form of the design whilst smaller cubic shapes are strategically placed within this to generate spaces for everyday living. The relationship between these two spatial qualities, of interior and exterior, reveals a series of unique spaces that can be used as an extension of the interior, or as a balcony-like outdoors area. 

The Story of Maggie's Centres: How 17 Architects Came to Tackle Cancer Care

01:00 - 27 April, 2014
The Story of Maggie's Centres: How 17 Architects Came to Tackle Cancer Care, Dundee, Scotland, 2003 by Frank Gehry / Courtesy of Maggie's Centres. ImageThe third center was designed by Frank Gehry, a close friend of Maggie's. “Frank gave us so much publicity, and allowed us to raise the money,” Jencks says. Each center is self-financed through donations.
Dundee, Scotland, 2003 by Frank Gehry / Courtesy of Maggie's Centres. ImageThe third center was designed by Frank Gehry, a close friend of Maggie's. “Frank gave us so much publicity, and allowed us to raise the money,” Jencks says. Each center is self-financed through donations.

Maggie's Centres are the legacy of Margaret Keswick Jencks, a terminally ill woman who had the notion that cancer treatment environments and their results could be drastically improved through good design. Her vision was realized and continues to be realized today by numerous architects, including Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, and Snøhetta - just to name a few. Originally appearing in Metropolis Magazine as Living with Cancer,” this article by Samuel Medina features images of Maggie's Centres around the world, taking a closer look at the organization's roots and its continued success through the aid of architects.

It was May 1993, and writer and designer Margaret Keswick Jencks sat in a windowless corridor of a small Scottish hospital, dreading what would come next. The prognosis was bad—her cancer had returned—but the waiting, and the waiting room, were draining. Over the next two years until her death, she returned several times for chemo drips. In such neglected, thoughtless spaces, she wrote, patients like herself were left to “wilt” under the desiccating glare of fluorescent lights.

Wouldn’t it be better to have a private, light-filled space in which to await the results of the next bout of tests, or from which to contemplate, in silence, the findings? If architecture could demoralize patients—could “contribute to extreme and mental enervation,” as Keswick Jencks observed—could it not also prove restorative?

Highlands, Scotland, 2005 by Page\Park Architects / Courtesy of Page\Park Architects. ImageA collaboration between Page\Park and Charles Jencks, Maggie's Centre Inverness at Highlands weaves together building and landscape in a unified composition. The design invokes the formal properties of mitosis or cell division; scaled up, they are manifested in the swirling landscape mounds and the center's spiraling form. "The cell is the unit of life: dynamic, really exciting, a factory of life itself, and I thought it was time to celebrate the cell," Jencks has said in the past. Fife, Scotland, 2006 by Zaha Hadid Architects / © Werner Huthmacher. ImageAll sharp angles and painted a sinister black, Zaha Hadid's Fife center isn't the first thing you'd expect from a Maggie's Centre. The exterior invited comparisons to a bunker, despite the airy, humane spaces within. "Zaha got a lot of criticism and her building is bloody good," Jencks says of his former student's design. The building was the architect's first in the UK. Manchester, England, 2016 by Fosters + Partners / Courtesy of Fosters + Partners. ImageThe next center is set to open in Manchester, where Norman Foster was born and raised. “Norman came to us, and I was waiting because he is an old friend of mine,” Jencks says. “He had cancer, and because of his own experiences, he was really interested in doing this. He’s got everything he’s ever wanted in this building.” Aberdeen, Scotland, 2013 by Snøhetta / © Philip Vile . ImageThe center's cocoon-like shell packs a big, Niemeyer-esque punch despite its modest proportions. The interiors, however, reveal a Scandinavian influence, with extensive timber coverings and exquisite stone accents. The building has been nicknamed "the Pebble" by locals. +11

HASSELL, COX Architecture, HKS To Design Australia’s Largest Sporting Precinct

00:00 - 26 April, 2014
HASSELL, COX Architecture, HKS To Design Australia’s Largest Sporting Precinct, Burswood Peninsula Master Plan. Image Courtesy of Government of Western Australia
Burswood Peninsula Master Plan. Image Courtesy of Government of Western Australia

The West Australian government has confirmed, HASSELL, COX Architecture and HKS will collaborate to design Australia’s largest ever stadium project. The $900million project will see Perth’s Burswood Peninsula transformed into a world-class sporting precinct by 2018. Included in the master plan is a new stadium that will hold some 60,000 spectators, a public tennis facility, significant transport infrastructure upgrades, such as a new train and bus station, and large public parklands. As negotiations continue between the firms and the West Australian Government, we should expect to see detailed drawings of the scheme by at least July with construction expected to begin by the end of this year.

Venice Biennale 2014: Paraguay to Submit Tensile Water Structure

00:00 - 26 April, 2014
Venice Biennale 2014: Paraguay to Submit Tensile Water Structure, Courtesy of Javier Corvalan + Colectivo Aqua Alta
Courtesy of Javier Corvalan + Colectivo Aqua Alta

Paraguay means “water that flows toward the sea” in the language of the country’s indigenous Guarani people. It is no surprise, then, that Paraguay’s entry for the 2014 Venice Biennale uses water as the primary structural member. Titled “Aqua Alta,” the Paraguayan pavilion responds to the Biennale’s focus on modern fundamentals by stating that modern architecture must achieve more with less.

Culturehouse in Arnhem / Neutelings Riedijk Architects

01:00 - 26 April, 2014
© Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects
© Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects

© Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects © Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects © Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects © Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects +26

Doncaster Civic Office / Cartwright Pickard Architects

01:00 - 26 April, 2014
Doncaster Civic Office / Cartwright Pickard Architects, © Hundven Clements Photography
© Hundven Clements Photography

© Hundven Clements Photography © Hundven Clements Photography © Hundven Clements Photography © Hundven Clements Photography +22

Grimshaw Architects Merge Architecture and Industrial Design at Milan Furniture Fair

01:00 - 26 April, 2014
Grimshaw Architects Merge Architecture and Industrial Design at Milan Furniture Fair , The lobby of the Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows, New York. At this month’s Milan Furniture Fair, Grimshaw Architects collaborated on an exhibition with Poltrona Frau. The show included an augmented-reality app—first introduced on the cover of Metropolis in October 2012—that brings 2-D images to life. / © David Sundberg
The lobby of the Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows, New York. At this month’s Milan Furniture Fair, Grimshaw Architects collaborated on an exhibition with Poltrona Frau. The show included an augmented-reality app—first introduced on the cover of Metropolis in October 2012—that brings 2-D images to life. / © David Sundberg

Grimshaw Architects' dual focus on industrial and architectural design will be celebrated this month in a featured exhibit at Milan Furniture Fair. In this article, originally published by Metropolis under the title "Down to the Details," author Ken Shulman presents the firm's evolution in the context of the exhibit, touching on the projects being presented and more intriguingly — on how they are being presented. 

Shortly after he joined Grimshaw Architects, Andrew Whalley was tasked with putting together an exhibition at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in London. Titled Product + Process, the 1988 show was decidedly counter-current—a parade of pragmatic, largely industrial structures Grimshaw realized in the UK in the face of surging postmodern fervor. Featured projects included the transparent building the then 15-person firm designed to house the Financial Times’ London printing facilities, and a flexible, easily reconfigurable factory Grimshaw built for Herman Miller in Bath. But it wasn’t the selection of projects that caught the public eye. “We asked our clients to take apart pieces of their buildings, and then rebuild them for the exhibition,” says Whalley, now deputy chairman of Grimshaw. “This wasn’t a typical show of architectural drawings and models.”

FaulknerBrowns Propose Community Velodrome Scheme in Canada

01:00 - 26 April, 2014
FaulknerBrowns Propose Community Velodrome Scheme in Canada, Interior Visualisation. Image Courtesy of FaulknerBrowns Architects
Interior Visualisation. Image Courtesy of FaulknerBrowns Architects

British based FaulknerBrowns Architects have proposed plans for "one of only two velodromes in recent memory being planned" in the city of Edmonton, Canada. In a place where winters are cold and long, reaching -20 degrees celcius, the facility can be adapted for both indoor and outdoor use throughout the year. Clad in Canadian timber and polished stainless steel shingles wrapping around the building like a "twisted ribbon resembling the twisted sinuous cycle track," the scheme will be only the second major indoor cycle track facility in the country.

Secondary and Cooking School, Plasencia / LANDÍNEZ+REY | equipo L2G arquitectos

00:00 - 26 April, 2014
Secondary and Cooking School, Plasencia / LANDÍNEZ+REY | equipo L2G arquitectos, © Jesús Granada
© Jesús Granada
  • Architects

  • Location

    10600 Plasencia, Cáceres, Spain
  • Design Team

    David Landínez González-Valcárcel y Mónica González Rey (LANDÍNEZ+REY | equipo L2G arquitectos, slp [eL2Gaa]) + Rocío Landínez González-Valcárcel
  • Photographs

GP practice / LensºAss Architecten

01:00 - 26 April, 2014
© Philippe van Gelooven
© Philippe van Gelooven

© Philippe van Gelooven © Philippe van Gelooven © Philippe van Gelooven © Philippe van Gelooven +11

House in Fukai / Horibe Associates

01:00 - 26 April, 2014
House in Fukai / Horibe Associates, © Kaori Ichikawa
© Kaori Ichikawa

© Kaori Ichikawa © Kaori Ichikawa © Kaori Ichikawa © Kaori Ichikawa +11

  • Architects

  • Location

    Sakai, Osaka Prefecture, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    Naoko Horibe
  • Area

    139.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

Cube House / Nomena

01:00 - 25 April, 2014
Cube House / Nomena, © Juan Solano
© Juan Solano

© Juan Solano © Juan Solano © Juan Solano © Juan Solano +14

  • Architects

  • Location

    Punta Negra, Peru
  • Project Area

    310.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photography

Six Emerging Practitioners Win Architectural League Prize

00:00 - 25 April, 2014
Six Emerging Practitioners Win Architectural League Prize , myThread Pavilion, Jenny Sabin Studio, September 2012; built, Nike Stadium, NYC. Interior view of knitted pavilion. Commissioned by Nike FlyKnit Collective. Photo: Nike Inc.
myThread Pavilion, Jenny Sabin Studio, September 2012; built, Nike Stadium, NYC. Interior view of knitted pavilion. Commissioned by Nike FlyKnit Collective. Photo: Nike Inc.

The Architectural League Prize, one of North America’s most prestigious awards for young architects and designers, has been awarded to six emerging practitioners. Each recipient, whose work was deemed to be “exemplary and provocative” by the jury, presented their portfolios under the theme of “Overlay,” as the term “directs - rather than merely reconstructs - process.” This theme will now set the stage for a public forum in which each winner will use to exchange ideas. 

The 2014 Architectural League Prize winners are:

4th Moscow Biennale Architecture

00:00 - 25 April, 2014
4th Moscow Biennale Architecture

This year ARCH MOSCOW is held within the 4th Moscow Biennale Architecture. The Biennale fully reflects the latest architectural trends and promotes technical innovations, stylistic researches and experimentation in the field of design ideas. The best examples of domestic and foreign architectural achievements are displayed and the principles of development of the quality architectural environment are professionally discussed. Traditionally, ARCH MOSCOW is the best platform for establishing business contacts in the field of architecture, development and construction.

Will The +POOL Be The Largest Crowdfunded Civic Project Ever?

01:00 - 25 April, 2014
Courtesy of Family / PlayLab, Inc.
Courtesy of Family / PlayLab, Inc.

Historically, large city-changing projects have depended on the personal interests of a powerful individual: someone able to swim across both political and financial waters. But recently, projects like the High Line have shown the power and potential of projects envisioned and led by local communities.

Back in 2011 we visted our friends at CASE in their West Village office and they introduced us to a small firm across the hall: Family. While the team was working hard on a model in the middle of their large table, partner Dong-Ping Wong showed us some of their recent projects. One of them immediately caught our attention. A floating pool for Manhattan. In the form of a cross, it would sit in the East River, filtering its waters into four pools. This amazing -- and seemingly crazy -- idea was tantalizing. 

Architectural Photographers: Allan Crow

00:00 - 25 April, 2014
Architectural Photographers: Allan Crow, MAXXI Museum / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton+Crow
MAXXI Museum / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton+Crow

Allan Crow may be, as he humbly puts it, just one of "two blokes that take photos." But Hufton+Crow, the photography studio founded by him and Nick Hufton ten years ago, has reached far more than humble success. The duo have shot some of the most talked-about architectural works of the last few years -from Zaha Hadid's Galaxy Soho to Steven Holl's Sliced Porosity Block to BIG's Danish Maritime Museum - and have been published in renowned websites and magazines around the world. Learn more about how Crow began his career as well as his favorite architecture, after the break.

Galaxy Soho / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton+Crow Interior Remodeling of St. Moritz Church / John Pawson. Image © Hufton+Crow Market Hall in Ghent / Marie-José Van Hee + Robbrecht & Daem. Image © Hufton+Crow Heydar Aliyev Center / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton+Crow +12