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Naval Training Facilities / Longva Arkitekter

  • Architects: Longva Arkitekter
  • Location: Bergen, Norway
  • Client: Norwegian Defence Estates Agency
  • Cost: 40 Mill Euro
  • Area: 9050.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Ivan Brodey

© Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey

New Valer Church Proposal / Krill Architecture

In the competition for the church of Våler, Krill Architecture focused on a concept of an open ring in the woods. Tapping on a source of collective creativity in modern architecture, their design offers the chance to bring the development of church architecture to a new level. A building combining monumentality to accessibility, openness to spirituality, is awesome, while being friendly. In short: a church fitting in this time. More images and architects’ description after the break.

New Church of Våler Proposal / Francesco Fiotti

Placed in the southern part of the project area in continuity with the ancient church, the proposal for the New Church of Våler by Francesco Fiotti architects attempts to recover not only the orientation of it, but also the memory. Their design makes reference to the boat as a symbol of Christianity that welcomes and protects within it the faithful; the Drakkar as tribute at the exploratory tradition of the Norwegian people. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Spire / Visiondivision

Spire © Visiondivision
Spire © Visiondivision

Last week, we shared a great series of modular summer residences by Visiondivision that ranged from a small cabin to a massive castle. In the meantime, the firm has also been working on a competition proposal to replace a church in Våler, a small Norwegian town, after a devastating fire. For a firm that typically takes a standard design approach and then reinvents it or inverts it to form a completely new paradigm, we were impressed by their ability to bring a simplistic elegance to this religious structure. More about the church after the break.

New Våler Church Proposal / Martina Engblom & Ragnar Eythorsson

As an attempt to translate the history and dignity this space possesses, the design proposal for the New Våler Church by Martina Engblom & Ragnar Eythorsson presents visitors with an upraised monolithic structure, calling attention to what lies underneath to create a space for reflection. In calling attention to its existance, or lack there of, the substructural remains of the old church becomes the presumption for the new church. More images and architects’ description after the break.

New Church in Våler Proposal / Studio DMTW

Compared to the design of a secular building, where the focus primarily lies on the programmatically and functional aspects, Studio DMTW believes a church has additive characteristics which need to be considered. Their design combines both the history of the place and all requirements that are imposed on a contemporary church with a high symbolic value and aesthetics and is thus entitled to the new living center for the Våler community. More images and architects’ description after the break.

New Church of Vaaler Proposal / CEBRA

Courtesy of CEBRA
Courtesy of CEBRA

The design proposal by CEBRA for the New Church of Vaaler is based on the most widespread symbol for the Christian church: the cross. Located in the south eastern part of Norway, it is a strong visual symbol, which beautifully combines the horizontal with the vertical in its simplicity – and in its meaning the worldly with the heavenly. In the same way, the cross also represents the church’s fundamental function. More images and architects’ description after the break.

New Church in Norway Proposal / Studio BANG

Studio BANG shared with us their design proposal for the competition for Ny Våler Kirke, a new church in Norway. Through creating a perceivable tribute to the old wooden church, their concept results in an upward focus that transports light into the holy space. More images and a brief architects’ description after the break.

Skyscape Church / We Architecture

Courtesy of We Architecture
Courtesy of We Architecture

Burnt down in 2009, the beautiful Vaaler church from 1805 has been designed as a new church by WE Architecture. Meant to provide symbolic landmark to succeed the old building, the new Vaaler church is placed further east from the placement of the old church, marking the historic axis with its tower. The new building is designed as a simple box where one corner is lifted up in order to point out the church room and the tower. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Arboretum / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Location: Øverbyvegen88-104, 2825 Gjøvik, Norway
  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects - Vibeke Jenssen, Kaori Watanabe, Sami Rintala and Dagur Eggertsson
  • Design Team: Dagur Eggertsson, Julian Fors, Fabricio Ferreira Fernandes, Matthew Donnachie, Sölvi Magnússon, Kaori Watanabe and Vibeke Jenssen
  • Curator: Public Art Norway (KORO), Mette Kvandal and Per Henrik Svalastog
  • Client: Public Construction and Property Management (Statsbygg), Tommy Pedersen
  • User: Gjøvik Care Centre
  • User Representative: Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs (Bufetat), Anne-Beth Brekke, Geir Rune Nyhus and Kai Børresen
  • Photographs: Pasi Aalto

© Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto

Røldal Pilgrim Center Proposal / LETH & GORI

LETH & GORI shared with us their proposal for the Pilgrim Centre in Røldal which creates a new building in close connection with the 13th century church. Made as an extension to the existing church wall, their design becomes a natural and integral part of the Church complex. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Infrastructural Archeaology / Map 13

Map 13 shared with us their project, Infrastructural Archeaology. Landfills are areas of great potential which are but a mere evidence of the uncontrolled cosumerism of this extreme society. They understand that waste should be buried and isolated, and not be forgotten and abandoned. It is thus an open project, where the definite plan of its pieces is not the main interest, but rather the definition of its systems and their development in time. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Parkveien 5b-c / KIMA

  • Architects: KIMA
  • Location: Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: KIMA
  • Project Team: Martin Dietrichson, Kristoffer Moe Bøksle, Haukur Morthens, Inge Hareide, Erlend Seilskjær
  • Client: Infill AS
  • Area: 945.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Ivan Brodey, Finn Ståle Feldberg, Dag Alveng, Magne Risnes

© Finn Ståle Feldberg © Finn Ståle Feldberg © Dag Alveng © Ivan Brodey