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Tunnels: The Latest Architecture and News

Elon Musk Unveils the Boring Company's New Test Tunnel under Los Angeles

07:30 - 19 December, 2018
Elon Musk Unveils the Boring Company's New Test Tunnel under Los Angeles, © Twitter / The Boring Company
© Twitter / The Boring Company

Elon Musk’s Boring Company has unveiled the latest component of their visionary plans for a network of tunnels under Los Angeles. The new “Hawthorne” test tunnel, built at the corner of SpaceX’s parking lot, forms part of Musk’s mission to reduce traffic in cities through a dual system of boring tunnels, and fully electric, autonomous transport to operate within them.

The Los Angeles project ultimately seeks to develop a large, multi-layered network with a loop of highway tunnels seeing cars traveling at 150 miles per hour. While cars will use the superhighways for a small fee, the company will also have a fleet of Teslas operating as public transport.

Call for Submissions: AIANY + ASLANY Transportation + Infrastructure Design Excellence Awards

11:48 - 2 August, 2018
Call for Submissions: AIANY + ASLANY Transportation + Infrastructure Design Excellence Awards

The AIANY + ASLANY Transportation + Infrastructure Design Excellence Awards recognize exceptional design by New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania AIA and ASLA members. The awards program is open to registered architects, landscape architects, and planners.

Submerged Floating Tunnels May Be the Solution to Crossing Norway's Treacherous Fjords

16:30 - 26 July, 2016
Submerged Floating Tunnels May Be the Solution to Crossing Norway's Treacherous Fjords, via Norwegian Public Roads Administration
via Norwegian Public Roads Administration

Norway’s Public Roads Administration have begun conducting feasibility studies on the installation of what would be the world’s first floating underwater tunnel system. Norway is famous for its fjords, whose incredible depths make traditional bridge building a costly headache. Instead, the most common way to traverse them is through the use of ferries, a system that is both slow and subject to harsh weather conditions. As a result, engineers began looking for a new solution.