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Sao Paolo: The Latest Architecture and News

C+C House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Samanta Cafardo

08:00 - 7 February, 2019
C+C House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Samanta Cafardo, © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG + 60

  • Architects

  • Location

    São Paulo, Brazil
  • Category

  • Lead Architect

    Marcio Kogan
  • Associated Architect

    Samanta Cafardo
  • Interior Design

    Diana Radomysler
  • Design Team

    Carlos Costa, Eline Ostyn, Laura Guedes, Mariana Simas, Ricardo Ariza
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

Ecumenical Center / Carolina Maluhy

14:00 - 6 February, 2019
Ecumenical Center  / Carolina Maluhy, © Ilana Bessler
© Ilana Bessler

© Ilana Bessler © Ilana Bessler © Ilana Bessler © Ilana Bessler + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Rodovia Castelo Branco, Km 101,50 - Bairro Indaiatuba - Caixa Postal 234, Porto Feliz - SP, 18540-000, Brazil
  • Category

  • Lead Architect

    Carolina Maluhy
  • Aea

    210.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

The First Complete Street in Sao Paulo has a 92% Approval Rating

12:00 - 26 January, 2019
The First Complete Street in Sao Paulo has a 92% Approval Rating, Rua Joel Carlos Borges, in Sao Paulo. Image: Pedro Mascaro/WRI Brasil
Rua Joel Carlos Borges, in Sao Paulo. Image: Pedro Mascaro/WRI Brasil

The implementation of a Complete Street is something to be celebrated. A Complete Street initiative is a clear indication that a city is striving for urban mobility and seeking a more democratic and safer use of space. Nevertheless, it is vital to measure the impact of these interventions when implementing future actions.

Joel Carlos Borges Street, the first Complete Street in São Paulo, underwent an evaluation two months after it was completed. The study revealed that 92% of its users approved of the project and believed that the changes were beneficial.

Mira Apartment / SuperLimão Studio

16:00 - 24 January, 2019
Mira Apartment / SuperLimão Studio, © Maíra Acayaba
© Maíra Acayaba

© Maíra Acayaba © Maíra Acayaba © Maíra Acayaba © Maíra Acayaba + 31

  • Architects

  • Location

    São Paulo, State of São Paulo, Brazil
  • Category

  • Project Team

    Lula Gouveia, Thiago Rodrigues, Antonio Carlos Figueira de Mello, Juliana Sae, Carolina Gurgel
  • Area

    240.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Warde Office / Studio AG Arquitetura

14:00 - 1 January, 2019
Warde Office / Studio AG Arquitetura, © Ricardo Bassetti
© Ricardo Bassetti

© Ricardo Bassetti © Ricardo Bassetti © Ricardo Bassetti © Ricardo Bassetti + 20

APR House / Studio AG Arquitetura

12:00 - 7 December, 2018
APR House / Studio AG Arquitetura, © Ricardo Bassetti
© Ricardo Bassetti

© Ricardo Bassetti © Ricardo Bassetti © Ricardo Bassetti © Ricardo Bassetti + 27

Box House / Flavio Castro

08:00 - 29 November, 2018
Box House / Flavio Castro, © Pedro Kok
© Pedro Kok

© Pedro Kok © Pedro Kok © Pedro Kok © Pedro Kok + 82

  • Architects

  • Location

    São Paulo, Brazil
  • Category

  • Author

    Flávio Castro
  • Team

    Flávio Castro, Flávia Marques
  • Area

    240.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Library / Pascali Semerdjian Arquitetos

16:00 - 20 November, 2018
Library / Pascali Semerdjian Arquitetos, © Ruy Teixeira
© Ruy Teixeira

© Ruy Teixeira © Ruy Teixeira © Ruy Teixeira © Ruy Teixeira + 28

  • Architects

  • Location

    São Paulo, State of São Paulo, Brazil
  • Category

  • Architects in Charge

    Domingos Pascali, Sarkis Semerdjian
  • Team

    Domingos Pascali, Sarkis Semerdjian, Linda Matolli, Lucas Florentino
  • Area

    645.8 ft2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Safdie Architects and Perkins+Will's Albert Einstein Medical School Breaks Ground in São Paulo

11:00 - 7 November, 2018
Safdie Architects and Perkins+Will's Albert Einstein Medical School Breaks Ground in São Paulo, Vista do átrio. Image Cortesia de Safdie Architects
Vista do átrio. Image Cortesia de Safdie Architects

The first Brazilian project by Safdie Architects has broken ground in Sao Paolo's Morumbi neighborhood on November 6. Developed in partnership with Perkins+Will, The Albert Einstein Education and Research Center is part of the Albert Einstein hospital complex.

The new center, named Campus Cecilia and Abram Szajman, will be one of the most advanced institutions in Latin America for medical studies. It will feature innovations in learning methods and technologies, as well as flexible research laboratories capable of adapting to the advancement of hospital techniques.

Which Cities Have the Most High-Rises?

06:00 - 19 June, 2018
Which Cities Have the Most High-Rises?

The downtown skyline of a city is perhaps its most symbolic feature. The iconic cityscapes that we know and love are typically formed by skyscrapers, but much of the surrounding context is made up of other high-rise buildings. Yes, there is a difference between a skyscraper and a high-rise. Research company Emporis defines a high-rise as a building at least 35 meters (115 feet) or 12 stories tall. These high-rise buildings play a major role in the more sprawled urban context of larger cities today.

Read on for Emporis' list of the 20 cities in the world with the most high-rises. You might be surprised by which cities made the cut.

Which Cities Have the Most High-Rises? © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Sajeewashaluka'>Wikimedia user Sajeewashaluka </a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/22240293@N05'>Flickr user Francisco Diaz</a> licensed under <a href=’https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/people/88503995@N02'>Flickr user Younguk Kim</a> licensed under <a href=’https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 27

What Makes a City Livable to You?

09:30 - 28 April, 2018
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132839384@N08/17241901246'>Flickr user Hafitz Maulana</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageA music festival in Singapore
© Flickr user Hafitz Maulana licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageA music festival in Singapore

Mercer released their annual list of the Most Livable Cities in the World last month. The list ranks 231 cities based on factors such as crime rates, sanitation, education and health standards, with Vienna at #1 and Baghdad at #231. There’s always some furor over the results, as there ought to be when a city we love does not make the top 20, or when we see a city rank highly but remember that one time we visited and couldn’t wait to leave.

To be clear, Mercer is a global HR consultancy, and their rankings are meant to serve the multinational corporations that are their clients. The list helps with relocation packages and remuneration for their employees. But a company’s first choice on where to send their workers is not always the same place you’d choose to send yourself to.

And these rankings, calculated as they are, also vary depending on who’s calculating. Monocle publishes their own list, as does The Economist, so the editors at ArchDaily decided to throw our hat in as well. Here we discuss what we think makes cities livable, and what we’d hope to see more of in the future.

What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings

06:00 - 6 April, 2018
What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings, Han Zhang along with her team at <a href="http://www.archdaily.cn">ArchDaily China</a>. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang
Han Zhang along with her team at ArchDaily China. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now.