All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Rapid Prototyping

Rapid Prototyping: The Latest Architecture and News

5-Axis Milling: The Next Level In Accessible, Versatile Digital Fabrication

00:00 - 16 October, 2014

The 5AXISMAKER is a desktop 5-axis multi-fabrication CNC machine that hopes to expand the possibilities of digital fabrication by making it cheap and more versatile. Should the project receive backing on Kickstarter before the 27th October 2014, the possibility of 5-axis milling will become an affordable reality for manufacturing complex design prototypes. The product in development "provides a large cutting volume for it’s size, therefore producing "generously sized objects." Developed by graduates of London's Architectural Association, they hope to "shake the manufacturing world with new ways of fabricating using industrial robots right at your desk."

A Practical Study in the Discipline of Architectural Modelmaking

01:00 - 6 October, 2014
A Practical Study in the Discipline of Architectural Modelmaking, Courtesy of Laurence King Publishers
Courtesy of Laurence King Publishers

Why do we make models? From sketch maquettes and detail tests to diagrammatic and presentation models, the discipline of physically crafting ideas to scale is fundamental to the architect's design process. For architect and educator Nick Dunn, architectural models ultimately "enable the designer to investigate, revise and further refine ideas in increasing detail until such a point that the project's design is sufficiently consolidated to be constructed." In Dunn's second edition of his practical guide and homage to the architectural model, the significance and versatility of this medium is expertly visualised and analysed in a collection of images, explanations, and case studies.

Courtesy of Laurence King Publishers Courtesy of Laurence King Publishers Courtesy of Laurence King Publishers Courtesy of Laurence King Publishers + 5

An Interview With Materials And Rapid Prototyping Specialist Krista Ninivaggi

00:00 - 30 July, 2014
An Interview With Materials And Rapid Prototyping Specialist Krista Ninivaggi, A light pendant developed by Ninivaggi for the vault space at Barclay's. Ninivaggi produced a full-scale mockup of the piece to convince the client of the design. Image Courtesy of Miho Aikawa and SHoP
A light pendant developed by Ninivaggi for the vault space at Barclay's. Ninivaggi produced a full-scale mockup of the piece to convince the client of the design. Image Courtesy of Miho Aikawa and SHoP

Named the 2014 Designer of The Year by Contract Magazine, Krista Ninivaggi of K & Co is an expert in material innovation. In the following interview, Susan S. Szenasy of Metropolis Magazine asks the young designer about her design process, the materials she uses and more.

Archibot to Print CAD Data "Error Free" onto Construction Sites

00:00 - 20 April, 2014
Archibot to Print CAD Data "Error Free" onto Construction Sites, Visualisation. Image Courtesy of Han Seok Nam
Visualisation. Image Courtesy of Han Seok Nam

Archibot, a project currently being developed by South Korean architectural designer Han Seok Nam, aims to "revolutionize" how architects and contractors work on construction sites by printing digital CAD plans onto the ground "error free." Having recently been granted a patent, the robot seeks to avoid the human errors associated with interpreting information from construction documents.

According to Nam, a contractor "will be able to grasp exactly where the door and the wall needs to be constructed by having the construction documents be printed directly onto the site without measurements. Errors will be easily detectable since the construction document can be directly compared to a life-size print out directly on the construction site." It would be "just like following a map and driving towards a destination."

See a video of the robot at work, after the break...

The Burgeoning Craft of 3D Printing

00:00 - 4 April, 2014
KPF’s models of concepts, facades, and building details. Image Courtesy of John Chu/Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
KPF’s models of concepts, facades, and building details. Image Courtesy of John Chu/Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

This article by Marc Kristal from Metropolis Magazine, originally titled "Digital Details," looks at the work of NRI, a New York company that is leading the way when it comes to 3D Printing (or rather, additive manufacturing) - finding that there is a craft in these machine-produced models after all.

First things first: The term “3-D printing” is a misnomer according to Arthur Young-Spivey, the digital fabrication specialist at NRI—a 116-year-old, New York–headquartered supplier of reprographic services to architects and their tradespeople. “The correct term is ‘additive manufacturing,’” he explains. “People call it 3-D printing because it enables you to wrap your head around it, but in some ways it’s confusing.”

Young-Spivey has a point, as the process by which a digital file is converted into an object isn’t “printing” in the commonly understood sense of applying pigment on a substrate. With 3-D printing, he says, “Instead of using paper, you’re printing with powder or plastics. It’s all one layer at a time.” The thinner the layer, the better the quality, and the longer the process takes. “And there’s always post-production processing, to clean up the model,” he adds. “That’s why ‘additive manufacturing’ is a more accurate description.”

Read on for more on the work of NRI

Adobe Photoshop Becomes a Tool for 3D Printing

00:00 - 3 February, 2014

Adobe has unveiled a major update to Photoshop CC (Creative Cloud) with the hope that a "radically simplified 3D printing process" will make their software the "go-to tool for anyone who wants to print a 3D model." Their new software allows for designers to create a model from scratch or refine an existing design leading to perfect print ready 3D models. Since one of the most common problems with 3D printing is the human errors in virtual modeling, Photoshop includes automatic mesh repair and will insert a support structure if necessary to ensure that the model will print reliably and without faults.

Villa Asserbo: A Sustainable, Printed House That Snaps Together

16:11 - 21 August, 2012
Villa Asserbo, a house whose printed pieces "snap" together, by Danish architects Eentileen. Photos via Fast Company.
Villa Asserbo, a house whose printed pieces "snap" together, by Danish architects Eentileen. Photos via Fast Company.

UPDATE: This post originally stated that Villa Asserbo was 3D Printed, when in fact its pieces were printed using rapid prototyping technology (a subtractive, rather than additive process).

We’ve covered 3D Printing a lot here at ArchDaily, but most of our coverage has been speculative and, frankly, futuristic – could we, one day, print out Gaudi-esque stone structures? Or even print a biologically-inspired, living house?

But today we heard a story about an alternative to 3D Printing‘s capabilities in the here and now - and its implications are pretty exciting.

In a small town outside of Copenhagen, Danish architects Eentileen joined forces with London-based digital fabrication and architecture specialists, Facit Homes, to create Villa Asserbo: a 1,250 square foot, sustainable home made from Nordic plywood fabricated via CNC miller and easily “snapped” together.

No heavy machinery, no cranes, no large labor force. Just a couple of guys, a few easily printed pieces, and six weeks.

Get more details about this sustainable, printed House, after the break…