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Council On Tall Buildings And Urban Habitat

CTBUH Reveals Best Tall Building Worldwide and Winners of 2018 Tall Building Awards

12:00 - 4 June, 2018
CTBUH Reveals Best Tall Building Worldwide and Winners of 2018 Tall Building Awards, Oasia Downtown Hotel. Image © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Oasia Downtown Hotel. Image © Patrick Bingham-Hall

The Council on Tall Building and Urban Habitat have announced the winners of the 16th edition of the CTBUH Tall Building Awards. From over 48 finalists in 28 countries, the best buildings from four regions – the Americas, Asia & Australasia, Europe, and Middle East & Africa – were selected, along with recipients of the Urban Habitat Award, the Innovation Award, the Construction Award and the 10 Year Award. From these finalists, the CTBUH has also awarded the Best Tall Building Worldwide to the Oasia Hotel Downtown by WOHA.

The towers were chosen by a panel of architects from world-renowned firms and were judged on every aspect of performance, looking in particular for those which “have made extraordinary contributions to the advancement of tall buildings and the urban environment, and that achieve sustainability at the highest and broadest level.”

Ground Zero Masterplan. Image © Studio Daniel Libeskind MULTI. Image © thyssenkrupp New York Times Tower. Image © Anthony Wood Oasia Downtown Hotel. Image © Patrick Bingham-Hall + 11

The Results Are In: 2016 Is a Record-Breaking Year for Tall Buildings

08:00 - 13 January, 2017
The Results Are In: 2016 Is a Record-Breaking Year for Tall Buildings, Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre. Image Courtesy of K11 New World Development
Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre. Image Courtesy of K11 New World Development

In its annual report, the 2016 Tall Building Year in Review, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has announced that 2016 saw the completion of a record 128 buildings 200 meters or higher. This number surpasses the previous record of 114 completions set in 2015. Eighteen of these buildings became the tallest in their city, country, or region, and ten earned the designation of supertall, at 300 meters and above.

Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre. Image Courtesy of K11 New World Development Ningbo Bank of China. Image Courtesy of Ningbo Eastern New City Development Warsaw Spire. Image Courtesy of UNK Ghelamco Shenzhen CFC Changfu. Image © Cheng Chen + 13

Winners of the Inaugural China Tall Building Awards

14:00 - 26 February, 2016
Winners of the Inaugural China Tall Building Awards, Best Tall Building China: Wangjing SOHO, Beijing / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © CCDI
Best Tall Building China: Wangjing SOHO, Beijing / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © CCDI

The China International Exchange Committee for Tall Buildings (CITAB) and the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) have announced the winners of their inaugural China Tall Building Awards. Four buildings, including two designed by Zaha Hadid and Kengo Kuma, were chosen as China's best tall buildings. Other winners were recognized for their innovation, success within the urban environment, and construction excellence.

"With the support of the Architectural Society of China and the Architectural Society of China Shanghai, the first year of this regionally focused awards program was very successful, with numerous high-quality projects entering into the running under six categories of recognition," said CITAB and CTBUH.

China’s Newly Completed Shanghai Tower Is Now the 2nd Tallest Building in the World

08:00 - 8 January, 2016
China’s Newly Completed Shanghai Tower Is Now the 2nd Tallest Building in the World, © Thomas Jaehndel via CTBUH
© Thomas Jaehndel via CTBUH

Gensler's recently completed Shanghai Tower is now the 2nd tallest building in the world, and the tallest building in China, according to The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH). At 632 meters tall, it is the third building in the world to exceed 600 meters and be designated “megatall.”

These Interactive Graphics Show the Evolution of Tall Buildings in New York

14:00 - 24 October, 2015
These Interactive Graphics Show the Evolution of Tall Buildings in New York, © CTBUH
© CTBUH

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat has released a new research study called New York: The Ultimate Skyscraper Laboratory, which utilizes data to “develop graphic features showing the progression of tall building development in New York City.”

The Timeline of Skyscrapers in New York City Region 1906-2018 graphic illustrates “how skyscraper construction aligned with social or political events in history” in the context of key events, for example, building inactivity around the period of World War II.

Santiago Calatrava's Turning Torso Wins CTBUH's 10 Year Award

14:15 - 6 August, 2015
Santiago Calatrava's Turning Torso Wins CTBUH's 10 Year Award, © Flickr CC User Mirko Junge
© Flickr CC User Mirko Junge

Rotating a full 90 degrees along nine pentagonal sections, Santiago Calatrava's "Turning Torso" was deemed the world's first twisting skyscraper upon its completion in 2005. Still Scandinavia's tallest tower, the 190-meter Malmö skyscraper has been awarded a 10 Year Award by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) for its continued valued to the surrounding area and successful performance across a number of categories, including environmental, engineering performance, vertical transport, iconography, and others.

“The Twisting Torso is one of those superb examples that went beyond the creation of a signature tower and helped shape an entirely new and invigorating urban fabric,” said Timothy Johnson, Vice Chairman, CTBUH Board of Trustees and Partner, NBBJ.

CTBUH Names World's 4 Best Skyscrapers of 2015

12:31 - 22 June, 2015
CTBUH Names World's 4 Best Skyscrapers of 2015, Bosco Verticale. Image © Kirsten Bucher
Bosco Verticale. Image © Kirsten Bucher

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has shortlisted four buildings for the annual "Best Tall Building Awards." Considered to be the four best skyscrapers of the year, the buildings have been named from each of the four competing regions in the world - Americas; Asia and Australia; Europe; the Middle East and Africa - from nominees representing 33 countries. One of the buildings will be crowned the world's best at a ceremony this November.

The four top skyscrapers for 2015 are...

VIDEO: What We Can Learn From Tall Buildings

14:00 - 19 February, 2014

What do you think the North American, Asian and Western European tall building communities most need to learn from each other? This is precisely what the Center on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) sat down to ask five leading architects, whose responses formed an eclectic and meaningful overview on the state of tall building worldwide. As Rem Koolhaas noted, each region has their own journey that is worth understanding, such as the Arab world’s transition from “extravagance to rationality” or Asia’s hyper-focus on project realization. But, as James Goettsch points out, “not every building has to be something remarkable." It’s alright for some buildings to be nothing more than “good citizens.”

The Indicator: What Goes Up Does Not Come Down

00:00 - 20 November, 2013
The Indicator: What Goes Up Does Not Come Down, One World Trade Center as seen from the Hudson River. Image © Joe Mabel via Wikipedia
One World Trade Center as seen from the Hudson River. Image © Joe Mabel via Wikipedia

We all know what architecture critic Banksy thinks about 1 World Trade Center. He infamously called it a “shyscraper” in an op-ed piece the New York Times declined to publish. But that hasn’t stopped the article from circulating and pissing New Yorker’s off. In true Banksy form you can find it on his website, mocked up to appear like a front page headline.

In it, he writes, “It reminds you of a really tall kid at a party, awkwardly shifting his shoulders trying not to stand out from the crowd. It’s the first time I’ve ever seen a shy skyscraper.” Of course, this didn’t stop the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) from recently celebrating it as the tallest building in this here United States of America. Yippee ki-yay!

But- who cares? New York has many other things going on urbanistically and architecturally that render tallness less significant than it used to be, if not outright pointless. Infrastructural interventions of the more horizontal sort, a la the High Line for example, seem far more significant. In the face of real urban complexity and uneven development, grasping for tallness is a simplistic go-to, while the real problems remain down on the street, unrelated to air rights, view corridors, sunlight access angles, and blocked horizons. 

And yet cities of the world continue to privilege tall towers as icons of economic and political might. 

2011 Skyscraper Trends

15:00 - 30 January, 2012
© TFP Farrells
© TFP Farrells

Every January the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat conducts a review of skyscraper construction and compiles all the data from the previous year. The trend since 2007 has seen record breaking years for buildings taller than 200 meters completed, with 88 skyscrapers completed in 2011. Even as the global economy is slowly recuperating from the 2008 financial crisis, it would appear as though this trend will remain relatively stable. China, leading the pack at 23 completed towers is predicted to remain at the forefront of skyscraper market, followed by Middle Eastern countries in the next decade. UAE, South Korea, and Panama City – an up and coming cosmopolitan city – rounded out the top four. Of the towers completed in 2011, 17 have made their way into the top 100 tallest buildings – Shenzhen’s Kingkey 100, at 442 meters crowning this year’s list. More after the break.