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Bill De Blasio

7 Lessons from New York's New Affordable Housing Design Guide

09:30 - 1 June, 2018
7 Lessons from New York's New Affordable Housing Design Guide , Broadway Housing in Santa Monica, by Kevin Daly, was identified by the report as a case study for its circulation. Image © Iwan Baan
Broadway Housing in Santa Monica, by Kevin Daly, was identified by the report as a case study for its circulation. Image © Iwan Baan

When we think of public housing architecture in the United States, we often think of boxes: big, brick buildings without much aesthetic character. But the implications of standardized, florescent-lit high-rises can be far more than aesthetic for the people who live there. Geographer Rashad Shabazz, for one, recalls in his book Spatializing Blackness how the housing project in Chicago where he grew up—replete with chain link fencing, video surveillance, and metal detectors—felt more like a prison than a home. Accounts of isolation, confinement, and poor maintenance are echoed by public housing residents nationwide.

But American public housing doesn’t have to be desolate. A new set of design standards from the New York City Public Design Commission (PDC)—in collaboration with The Fine Arts Federation of New York and the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter—hopes to turn over a new leaf in affordable housing architecture.

Step Up on Fifth in Santa Monica, by Brooks + Scarpa, was identified by the report as a case study for its windows and doors. Image Courtesy of Brooks + Scarpa The Navy Green development in Brooklyn was a key case study in the report. Here, the supportive housing from that development, designed by Architecture in Formation and Curtis + Ginsburg. Image © Tom Powel Imaging The Tetris Apartments in Ljubljana, by OFIS Arhitekti, were identified by the report as a case study for their massing. Image Courtesy of OFIS Arhitekti Creston Avenue Residence in the Bronx. Image Courtesy of MAP Architects + 16

Jan Gehl: "Civic Culture Needs Cultivating and Curating"

16:35 - 11 September, 2015
Jan Gehl: "Civic Culture Needs Cultivating and Curating", © Flickr CC User MK Feeney
© Flickr CC User MK Feeney

Danish architect and urban planning expert Jan Gehl has weighed in on New York Mayor Bill de Blasio's threat to remove Times Square as a"kneejerk reaction" to aggressive panhandling. Recounting beloved square's evolution, Gehl argues that public spaces need more than just to exist: "Civic culture needs cultivating and curating... Public spaces like Times Square are the great equalizer in cities: Improvements in the public realm benefit everyone. The city should view the challenge of Times Square’s pedestrian plaza not as a reason for retreat, but as a call to create a diverse, dense, intense experience of public life that we can all enjoy." Read Gehl's remarks, here.

New York City Mayor Threatens to Remove Times Square

14:46 - 26 August, 2015
New York City Mayor Threatens to Remove Times Square, Times Square in 2014. Image © Flickr CC User MK Feeney
Times Square in 2014. Image © Flickr CC User MK Feeney

Frustrated with the congestion of panhandlers, Mayor Bill de Blasio has shocked New York City dwellers by threatening to remove their beloved Times Square. As New York Times' architecture critic Michael Kimmelman reports, this comes at a time when dwellers fear that quality of life is declining in the city: "Entertaining the demolition of the plazas, the mayor sends a message that New York can’t support the sort of great pedestrian hubs that thrive in competing cities around the globe." Blasio said he will look into the "pros and cons" of returning Times Square to traffic. Read Kimmelman's full report on Blasio's threats, here

The Other "Green Way": Why Can't New York Build More Quality Affordable Housing?

00:00 - 10 November, 2014
The Other "Green Way": Why Can't New York Build More Quality Affordable Housing?, © Flickr CC User Jules Antonio
© Flickr CC User Jules Antonio

This article originally appeared on uncube magazine as "An Affordable Housing Complex in the Bronx Revisited."

Two years after the completion of Grimshaw and Dattner's acclaimed Via Verde ("Green Way"), no successors have even been proposed for this supposed model for the design and construction of new affordable housing. In this article, David Bench returns to the site, finding that the sustainable project's lack of impact is caused by a completely different type of "green."

Affordable housing is the quest of every New Yorker. The routes to finding it are mysterious and widely misunderstood, as they are made up of a myriad of buildings, programmes, and rules that have failed to keep pace with the production of luxury housing and gentrification of middle class neighbourhoods in the city. This apartment anxiety has led to such amusing and fateful reactions as the creation of the Rent is Too Damn High political party – whose name speaks for itself – and an economic narrative that propelled Bill de Blasio from a long-shot mayoral candidacy to an overwhelming majority on election day in 2013. Soon after taking office, de Blasio unveiled the most ambitious affordable housing program in generations, which aims to build or preserve 200,000 units in the next decade.

Fourteen Tower Proposals Unveiled for Controversial Brooklyn Bridge Park Development

01:00 - 8 August, 2014
Fourteen Tower Proposals Unveiled for Controversial Brooklyn Bridge Park Development, S9 Architecture's proposal. Image Courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation via Architects Newspaper
S9 Architecture's proposal. Image Courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation via Architects Newspaper

New York City have released images of fourteen tower proposals as part of a controversial scheme to bring affordable housing to the 85 acre Brooklyn Bridge Park, originally designed by Michael van Valkenburgh and realised in 2004. The schemes, designed to be located on “two coveted development sites” on Pier 6, have been actively met with strong opposition from local community members. The park and surrounding area has seen a number of interesting recent regeneration proposals, from an 11,000ft² beach beneath the Brooklyn Bridge to a triangular pier proposed by BIG. Read on to see the proposals in detail, including those by Asymptote, Pelli Clarke Pelli, Davis Brody Bond, and Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG).

Asymptote Architecture´s proposal. Image Courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation via Architects Newspaper Pelli Clarke Pelli's proposal. Image Courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation via Architects Newspaper BIG´s + Alloy Design's proposal. Image Courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation via Architects Newspaper WASA Studio's proposal. Image Courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation via Architects Newspaper + 42

Foster + Partners' New York Public Library Redesign in State of Limbo

00:00 - 10 March, 2014
Foster + Partners' New York Public Library Redesign in State of Limbo, © dbox, Courtesy of Foster + Partners
© dbox, Courtesy of Foster + Partners

Foster + Partner's controversial renovation plans for the New York Public Library (NYPL) are currently in a state of limbo while the city decides their course of action. Foster's proposal for the 20th century Carrère and Hastings "masterpiece" on 5th Avenue is a response to the cultural shift from traditional stacks to online resources, as the library has experienced a 41% decrease in the use of collections over the last 15 years.