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Automation: The Latest Architecture and News

Adaptative Plans: An Algorithm That Predicts Spatial Configurations

07:00 - 20 June, 2019

Automation has finally reached our desks. If just a few years ago we believed that technology (including robots) could replace the work done by humans, minus the design specifications and some 'creative' aspects, we were wrong.

The algorithm, Finch, generates different spatial configurations according to predetermined parameters as you change the total area of ​​the space. This helps to define zones in the initial stages of the project, which can then be refined according to the specific requirements of the assignment. The algorithm has been developed by BOX Bygg and Wallgren Arkitekter and written in Grasshopper, for now.

Illuminating the Future: How Bluetooth Mesh will Fundamentally Change Lighting Systems

04:00 - 4 March, 2019
Illuminating the Future: How Bluetooth Mesh will Fundamentally Change Lighting Systems, Image by Alexandre Zveiger
Image by Alexandre Zveiger

Imagine light fixtures that act as Bluetooth beacons, allowing smartphones to help visitors find their way around a building. Imagine a lighting system which can pinpoint the location of people and physical assets within the building. Imagine an automation system which can use occupancy data and personal preferences to orchestrate an optimized and personalized building environment.

The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019

08:30 - 4 February, 2019
The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019, © Alberto Cosi. ImageBamboo Sports Hall for Panyaden International School / Chiangmai Life Construction
© Alberto Cosi. ImageBamboo Sports Hall for Panyaden International School / Chiangmai Life Construction

It is, once again, the time of year where we look towards the future to define the goals and approaches that we will take for our careers throughout the upcoming year. To help the millions of architects who visit ArchDaily every day from all over the world, we compiled a list of the most popular ideas of 2018, which will continue to be developed and consolidated throughout 2019.

Over 130 million users discovered new references, materials, and tools in 2018 alone, infusing their practice of architecture with the means to improve the quality of life for our cities and built spaces. As users demonstrated certain affinities and/or demonstrated greater interest in particular topics, these emerged as trends. 

6 Spanish Projects That Creatively Use Louvers and Shutters in Their Facades

08:00 - 29 August, 2018
 6 Spanish Projects That Creatively Use Louvers and Shutters in Their Facades, Cortesía de Gradhermetic
Cortesía de Gradhermetic

During warm summer months, buildings must maintain an adequate and comfortable temperature for the users of the space. Blinds or solar screens are an effective solution in projects that have large glazed surfaces, thus reducing the temperatures generated by direct sunlight.

Below, we have selected 6 Spanish projects that creatively use louvers and shutters in their facades. 

Ampliación del Hospital de Sabadell / Estudi PSP Arquitectura. Image © Jordi Canosa i Blajot Escuela Secundaria Honoré de Balzac / NBJ architectes. Image © Photoarchitecture Campus Universitario y Parque Científico-Tecnológico / CANVAS Arquitectos. Image Cortesía de CANVAS Arquitectos Campus Diagonal / Enrique Batlle i Durany y Joan Roig i Durán. Image Cortesía de Gradhermetic + 17

Dutch Pavilion at 2018 Venice Biennale, WORK, BODY, LEISURE, to Address Automation and Its Spatial Implications

18:00 - 29 March, 2018
Dutch Pavilion at 2018 Venice Biennale, WORK, BODY, LEISURE, to Address Automation and Its Spatial Implications, Anthropometric Data - Crane Cabin Operator vs Remote Control Operator. Drawing by Het Nieuwe Instituut 2017. Image Courtesy of Het Nieuwe Instituut
Anthropometric Data - Crane Cabin Operator vs Remote Control Operator. Drawing by Het Nieuwe Instituut 2017. Image Courtesy of Het Nieuwe Instituut

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage we present the proposal for the Dutch Pavilion. Below, the participants describe their contribution in their own words.

Het Nieuwe Instituut, the Netherland’s leading museum and scholarly institution focused on architecture, design and digital culture, will present WORK, BODY, LEISURE, the Dutch exhibition for “FREESPACE”, the 16th International Architecture Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia. Commissioned by Het Nieuwe Instituut and curated by architect and researcher Marina Otero Verzier, the 2018 Dutch Pavilion exhibition addresses the spatial configurations, living conditions and notions of the human body provoked by disruptive changes in contemporary labor ethos and conditions. The project seeks to foster new modes of creativity and responsibility within the architectural field in response to emerging technologies of automation.

Will Automation Affect Architects?

08:00 - 10 January, 2018
Will Automation Affect Architects?, © Nicolás Valencia, using image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/masakiishitani/4065681012/'>Flickr user masakiishitani</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a>
© Nicolás Valencia, using image © Flickr user masakiishitani licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

According to The Economist, 47% of the work done by humans will have been replaced by robots by 2037, even those traditionally associated with university education. While the World Economic Forum estimates that between 2015 and 2020, 7.1 million jobs will be lost around the world, as "artificial intelligence, robotics, nanotechnology and other socio-economic factors replace the need for human employees."

It's not science fiction: the MIT Technology Review warns that the current debate over raising the minimum wage for fast food employees in the United States would accelerate their own automation. On the other hand, Silicon Valley personalities and millionaires like Elon Musk and Richard Branson warned that the impact of automation will force the creation of a universal basic income to compensate not only the massive unemployment that would generate these new technologies but also the hyper-concentration of the global wealth.

One advocate of this idea is the British economist Guy Standing who wrote at the Davos Forum that it "would be a sensible precaution against the possibility of mass displacement by robotization and artificial intelligence," but will automation affect architects? Will we really be replaced by robots?