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3d Printing Homes: The Latest Architecture and News

Overland Architects Design 3D Printed Neighborhoods in Texas

13:00 - 12 April, 2019
Overland Architects Design 3D Printed Neighborhoods in Texas, 3D Printed Neighborhood. Image Courtesy of Overland Partners
3D Printed Neighborhood. Image Courtesy of Overland Partners

San Antonio based architecture firm Overland Partners have designed a series of proposals for new 3D printed neighborhoods in Texas. Teaming up with nonprofit, 3 Strands Neighborhoods, and ICON, a creator of printers, robotics, and advanced materials, the firm utilized the Vulcan II 3D printer to revolutionize home building. The collaboration aims to address the housing crisis in America and establish a sense of community for disadvantaged families.

3D Printed Neighborhood. Image Courtesy of Overland Partners Overland Architects Design 3D Printed Neighborhoods in Texas Overland Architects Design 3D Printed Neighborhoods in Texas 3D Printed Neighborhood. Image Courtesy of Overland Partners + 6

Architecture by Robots, For Humanity

00:00 - 29 March, 2013
Architecture by Robots, For Humanity, Courtesy of blog.rhino3d.com - ROB/Arch Workshop, Rotterdam
Courtesy of blog.rhino3d.com - ROB/Arch Workshop, Rotterdam

Architecture is quickly adopting the popular technology of robots. Although it is slightly hard to define what “robot” really means, for architecture, it tends to refer to anything from robot arms to CNC mills to 3D printers. Basically, they are programmable, mechanical, and automated instruments that assist in processes of digital fabrication.

So, what might robots mean for architecture? A more precise architecture which could contribute to a more sustainable building life cycle? More innovative design derived from algorithmic processes? A more efficient prefabrication process that could reduce the time and cost of construction?

Probably a mix of all three. But more importantly, what might robots mean for humans? Robotic replacement for the construction worker? Loss of local craftsmanship and construction knowledge? Maybe. But I might reformulate the question. Asking what robots mean for humans implies passivity.  

What I ask, then, is what can robots do for humans?

Contour Crafting Picks Up Speed

00:00 - 4 February, 2013

In 2006, Dr. Behrokh Khoshnevis, professor at the University of Southern California, introduced the world to Contour Crafting: the idea of applying Computer Aided Design and 3D Printing to homes and eventually larger buildings. As Dr. Khoshnevis explains in this TED Talk, Contour Crafting uses a giant 3D printer that hangs over a designated space and robotically builds up the walls of that building with layers of concrete. The robot can paint the walls and tile surfaces and even knows to construct plumbing and electrical wiring as it goes (Dvice). The idea is that by automating the construction process - one of the only processes humans still do largely by hand - homes will be cheaper and more quickly erected, with significantly lower labor costs. More importantly, Khoshnevis believes that Contour Crafting is essential to creating a more "dignified" architecture by eliminating slums in developing countries and aiding areas in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster.