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Toshiyuki Yano

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House in Shiraiwa / 2id Architects

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 20

Hamamatsu, Japan
  • Architects: 2id Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 109.26 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

House in Konohana / Fujiwaramuro Architects

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 30

Osaka, Japan

Loop Terrace House / Tomohiro Hata Architect and Associates

© Toshiyuki Yano
© Toshiyuki Yano

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 23

House | Concepts

“A House is a place (…) as physical as a set of feelings. (…) a home is a relation between materiality and mastery and imaginative processes, where the physical location and materiality and the feelings and ideas are united and influence each other, instead of being separated and distinct. (…) a house is a process of creation and comprehension of ways of living and belonging. A house is lived, as well as imagined. The meaning of house and the way it materially manifests itself, it´s something that is created and recreated in an unceasingly way through every day domestic tasks, which are themselves connected to the spacial imaginary of the house”1

The sentence mentioned above is the starting-point of the current reflection, in an exercise that will mark meaningfully my approach to the way of projecting houses.

House in Nada / FujiwaraMuro Architects

© Toshiyuki Yano
© Toshiyuki Yano
Nada, Japan

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 13

Storage Solution for Small Houses: Useful Examples

Dense cities mean small homes. With more and more frequency we are forced to adapt to spaces within which some elements simply do not fit. As architects, these restrictions actually provide us with opportunities and remind us that our goal is to give precise solutions to specific problems. Designing with infinite number square meters and/or an unlimited budget is practically unheard of.

What's the key to accommodating everything? Let's review some effective storage solutions for minimum, tight spaces.

END THE ROC / nook architects. Image © Yago Partal Bazillion / YCL Studio. Image © Leonas Garbačauskas HB6B / Karin Matz. Image Cortesía de Karin Matz Gorki / Ruetemple. Image Cortesía de Ruetemple + 33

Continuing House / Naf Architect & Design

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 23

Yokosuka, Japan

House in Usuki / Kenta Eto Architects

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 35

Usuki, Japan
  • Architects: Kenta Eto Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 98.12 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Split-Level Homes: 50 Floor Plan Examples

Faced with the challenge of designing homes on terrains with steep slopes - or in compact urban contexts that do not allow much variation in plan - several architects have experimented and proposed split-level homes to enhance the use of space, allowing, among other things, interesting visual perspectives.

These variations can be seen in numerous examples published on our site. Below, we have selected 50 examples that can help you in your next project. 

Hybrid Homes: Living and Working Collide in These 26 Projects

© Tsukui Teruaki © Toshiyuki Yano © Vincent Hecht © Charles Davis Smith + 27

Normally, houses are divided into common areas, rooms, kitchens, and bathrooms. However, sometimes the client demands to add other programs related to their work or hobbies, making efficient design and daily spatial distribution more complex. As architects, we are faced with an interesting challenge: to merge the private life of its inhabitants with more public and open programs, generating exciting mixed-use spaces.

If you are interested in designing hybrid homes, we have selected 26 houses with additions including shops, soccer fields, barns, greenhouses, and even skateparks.

Space-Saving Solutions: 33 Creative Storage Ideas

© Hey! Cheese © Kat Lu © Hey! Cheese © Kai Nakamura + 34

The lack of storage space is a recurrent problem in homes. In most cases, residual spaces or uncomfortable corners are used to solve the lack of shelves, drawers, and closets. To efficiently incorporate these type of spaces into your designs, here are 33 remarkable storage examples.

32.4°House / Naf Architect & Design

© Toshiyuki Yano
© Toshiyuki Yano

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 19

Yokohama, Japan

Floating Hut / Tomohiro Hata Architect and Associates

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 35

Otsu, Japan

House in Tarumi / Tomohiro Hata Architect and Associates

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano House in Tarumi / Tomohiro Hata Architect and Associates + 28

House in Ishikiri / Fujiwaramuro Architects

Higashiosaka, Japan

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 29

House in Takatsuki / FujiwaraMuro Architects

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 15

House in Ikoma / FujiwaraMuro Architects

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 15

Ikoma, Japan

Catholic Suzuka Church / Alphaville Architects

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano + 53

Suzuka-shi, Japan