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AD Classics: Yokohama International Passenger Terminal / Foreign Office Architects (FOA)

16:00 - 17 October, 2018
AD Classics: Yokohama International Passenger Terminal / Foreign Office Architects (FOA), © Satoru Mishima / FOA
© Satoru Mishima / FOA

This article was originally published on ArchDaily in 2014.

The triumphant critical reception of the Yokohama International Passenger Terminal was the product of inventive architectural methodology and socially conscious thinking. Designed by Foreign Office Architects (FOA) in 1995, the futuristic terminal represented an emergent typology of transportation infrastructure. Its radical, hyper-technological design explored new frontiers of architectural form and simultaneously provoked a powerful discourse on the social responsibility of large-scale projects to enrich shared urban spaces.

© Satoru Mishima / FOA © Satoru Mishima / FOA © Satoru Mishima / FOA © Satoru Mishima / FOA + 22

Spotlight: Alejandro Zaera-Polo

02:30 - 17 October, 2018
Spotlight: Alejandro Zaera-Polo, Birmingham New Street Station. Image © Javier Callejas
Birmingham New Street Station. Image © Javier Callejas

Alejandro Zaera-Polo (born October 17th 1963) is an internationally recognized architect and scholar, and founder of London, Zurich, and Princeton-based firm Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Maider Llaguno Architecture (AZPML). First rising to prominence in the 1980s with his writings for publications such as El Croquis, Zaera-Polo has had a prolific career in both the academic and professional realms of architecture.

10 Projects Which Define the Architecture of Transit

04:00 - 29 August, 2016
10 Projects Which Define the Architecture of Transit , Courtesy of Detroit Publishing co. via US Library of Congress (Public Domain)
Courtesy of Detroit Publishing co. via US Library of Congress (Public Domain)

Architecture inherently appears to be at odds with our mobile world – while one is static, the other is in constant motion. That said, architecture has had, and continues to have, a significant role in facilitating the rapid growth and evolution of transportation: cars require bridges, ships require docks, and airplanes require airports.

In creating structures to support our transit infrastructure, architects and engineers have sought more than functionality alone. The architecture of motion creates monuments – to governmental power, human achievement, or the very spirit of movement itself. AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. Here we've assembled seven projects which stand as enduring symbols of a civilization perpetually on the move.

© Flickr user littleeve Courtesy of Wikimedia user A. Savin under CC BY-SA 3.0 © Satoru Mishima / FOA © Cameron Blaylock + 7

12 Projects that Explain Landscape Urbanism and How It's Changing the Face of Cities

08:00 - 6 April, 2016
12 Projects that Explain Landscape Urbanism and How It's Changing the Face of Cities

In his new book Landscape as Urbanism, Charles Waldheim, the John E. Irving Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, argues that in order to understand the twenty-first century metropolis, “a traditional understanding of the city as an extrapolation of architectural models and metaphors is no longer viable given the prevalence of larger forces or flows. These include ruptures or breaks in architectonic logic of traditional urban form as compelled by ecological, infrastructural, or economic change.”

In other words, spatial constructions in urban environments should no longer be attached to intractable functions or intent on isolation, but should instead integrate into the fabric of the city. These types of projects must be flexible to the inevitable changes in functionality and purpose that are byproducts of economic change and evolutions in land-use intentions. The dozen projects featured here are exemplary of such practices, both in how they adapt to past interventions and in how they move beyond the notion of a static future for urban conditions that are perpetually in flux.