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Miran Kambič

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Hotel Maestoso / ENOTA

© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič+ 35

  • Architects: ENOTA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  7785
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2021
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Intra Lighting, Plaka, Active Design, Alukomen, Energoinstal, +5

40 Shortlisted Projects Announced for the EU Mies Award 2022

The European Commission and the Mies van der Rohe Foundation have announced the 40 shortlisted works that will compete for the 2022 European Union Prize for Contemporary ArchitectureMies van der Rohe Award. The shortlist featured projects built across 18 different European countries, with Spain, Austria, and France topping the list with 5 entries each. The winners will be announced in April 2022 and the Award ceremony will take place in May 2022.

LocHal. Image © Stijn BollaertThe Railway Farm. Image © Myr MurateHelsinki Olympic Stadium. Image © Tuomas UusheimoGare Maritime. Image © Filip Dujardin+ 23

From Exchanges between Generations to Fostering Diversity: 5 Emerging Practices in Europe

Five emerging architecture studio profiles from Slovenia, France, Spain, Italy, and the United Kingdom have been chosen by New Generations, a European platform that analyses the most innovative emerging practices at the European level, providing a new space for the exchange of knowledge and confrontation, theory, and production. Since 2013, New Generations has involved more than 300 practices in a diverse program of cultural activities, such as festivals, exhibitions, open calls, video-interviews, workshops, and experimental formats.

House above the Valley / ARHITEKTURA / OFFICE FOR URBANISM AND ARCHITECTURE

© Miran Kambič
© Miran Kambič

© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič+ 20

Renovation of Castle Grad / ARREA architecture

© Miran Kambič© Tadej Bolta© Tadej Bolta© Tadej Bolta+ 15

  • Architects: ARREA architecture
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  8145
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2019

The Double Brick House / ARHITEKTURA / OFFICE FOR URBANISM AND ARCHITECTURE

© MIRAN KAMBIČ© MIRAN KAMBIČ© MIRAN KAMBIČ© MIRAN KAMBIČ+ 27

Why Should We Design Spaces with Furniture on Wheels?

© RuetempleCourtesy of People's Architecture Office© NirutBenjabanpot, Garrett Rowland© Tanja Milbourne+ 35

In a time where space grows more and more limited and people increasingly spend time at home, flexibility presents itself as an underutilized strategy of interior design. With flexible furniture, residents can optimize square footage and easily reshape configurations according to specific requirements and shifting needs. Below, we discuss the benefits and variations of furniture on wheels, closing with 7 example projects illustrating their creative and practical application.

Incorporating Fire in External Projects: Tips and Examples for Fireplaces

Whidbey Island Farm Retreat / mwworks. Image © Kevin ScottFireplace for Children / Haugen/Zohar Arkitekter. Image © Jason Havneraas & Grethe FredriksenCarraig Ridge Fireplace / Young Projects. Image © Bent René SynnevågVC House / Dumay Arquitectos. Image © Ignacio Infante Cobo+ 17

Yuval Noah Harari points out that, around 300 thousand years ago, Homo erectus, Neanderthals, and ancestors of Homo sapiens already used fire daily. According to the author of the international bestseller “Sapiens,” fire created the first significant gap between man and other animals. "By domesticating fire, humans gained control of an obedient and potentially limitless force." Some scholars even believe that there is a direct relationship between the advent of the habit of cooking food (possibly due to the domestication of fire) and the shortening of the intestinal tract and growth of the human brain, which allowed human beings to develop and create everything we now have.

The Laundry Room as an Unnecessary Luxury (or Where to Place the Washer in the Modern Home?)

In residential architecture, there have always been central, indispensable spaces and peripheral spaces more easy to ignore. When designing a home, the task of the architect is essentially to configure, connect, and integrate different functions in the most efficient way possible, necessarily prioritizing some spaces over others. And although today many are designing in ways that are increasingly fluid and indeterminate, we could say that the bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen are the fundamental nucleus of every house, facilitating rest, food preparation, and personal hygiene. Then meeting spaces and other service areas appear, and with them lobbies, corridors, and stairs to connect them. Each space guides new functions, allowing its inhabitants to perform them in an easier and more comfortable way.

However, fewer square meters in the bathroom could mean more space for the living room. Or, eliminating some seemingly expendable spaces could give more room for more important needs. In an overpopulated world with increasingly dense cities, what functions have we been discarding to give more space to the essentials? Here, we analyze the case of the laundry room, which is often reduced and integrated into other areas of the house to give space for other functions.

Rubikum For Three Apartment / ARHITEKTURA / OFFICE FOR URBANISM AND ARCHITECTURE

© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič© Miran Kambič+ 20

Ljubljana, Slovenia

What Types of Residential Floors Favor Wheelchair Circulation?

Klintholm Gods Lake Apartments / PLH Arkitekter. Image © Rozbeh ZavariHouse With Stone Patio / beef architekti. Image © Peter ČintalanHouse With Stone Patio / beef architekti. Image © Peter Čintalan© Ricardo Oliveira Alves+ 21

One of the most important design considerations that residential architects have the responsibility to address is accessibility, ensuring that people with disabilities can comfortably live at home without impediments blocking basic home functionality. Accessibility for wheelchair users is a particularly important architectural concern due to unalterable spatial, material, and other requirements necessitated by wheelchair design and use. Because guaranteeing the comfort of all users, including disabled users, is one of the most essential obligations of all architects, designing for wheelchair users must be done with utmost the attention and care, especially in residential environments. Below, we delineate several strategies for designing floors for wheelchair circulation, helping architects achieve this goal of maximum comfort and accessibility.

Recycled Materials Journey Through Factories and Collecting Facilities

Recycled and reused materials continue to grow as a more attractive alternative in the construction field. They are at most times a coveted sustainable substitute to conventional building materials, offering a financially resourceful solution when appropriately sourced and implemented. Aside from saving up on raw material costs, establishing recycling facilities or factories might present a good opportunity to generate jobs within a local setting (collecting, handling). The recycling process might also be used as a gateway to lower energy consumption, with some plants eventually generating their own power through specific material transformation techniques (Heat generated power). 

© Ivan Brodey© Theo PeekstokCourtesy of Vaillo + Irigaray© Nikolas Koenig+ 11

Mirrors in Architecture: Possibilities of Reflected Space

Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang
Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang

KAP-House / ONG&ONG Pte Ltd. Image © Derek SwalwellSi estas paredes hablasen / Serrano + Baquero Arquitectos. Image © Fernando AldaPH José Mármol / Estudio Yama. Image © Javier Agustin RojasThe Mirror Window / Kosaku Matsumoto. Image © Nobutada Omote+ 39

Humans have used mirrors since as early as 600 BCE, employing highly polished obsidian as a basic reflective surface. Over time, people began to use small pieces of gold, silver, and aluminum in a similar manner, both for their reflective properties and for decoration. By the 1st century CE, people had started using glass to make mirrors, but it was only during the European Renaissance that Venetian manufacturers began making mirrors by applying metallic backings to glass sheets, remaining the most common general method of mirror manufacturing today. Since then, mirrors have continued to play both a decorative and functional role in architecture, serving a clean, modern aesthetic despite its ancient origins. Below, we investigate how mirrors are made, provide a brief history of mirrors in architecture, and offer several tips for architects looking to use mirrors in their designs.