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Lisbeth Grosmann

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Mirrors in Architecture: Possibilities of Reflected Space

Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang
Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang

KAP-House / ONG&ONG Pte Ltd. Image © Derek SwalwellSi estas paredes hablasen / Serrano + Baquero Arquitectos. Image © Fernando AldaPH José Mármol / Estudio Yama. Image © Javier Agustin RojasThe Mirror Window / Kosaku Matsumoto. Image © Nobutada Omote+ 39

Humans have used mirrors since as early as 600 BCE, employing highly polished obsidian as a basic reflective surface. Over time, people began to use small pieces of gold, silver, and aluminum in a similar manner, both for their reflective properties and for decoration. By the 1st century CE, people had started using glass to make mirrors, but it was only during the European Renaissance that Venetian manufacturers began making mirrors by applying metallic backings to glass sheets, remaining the most common general method of mirror manufacturing today. Since then, mirrors have continued to play both a decorative and functional role in architecture, serving a clean, modern aesthetic despite its ancient origins. Below, we investigate how mirrors are made, provide a brief history of mirrors in architecture, and offer several tips for architects looking to use mirrors in their designs.

What to Expect from Interiors of the Future

In 2018, the UN released an article stating that 55% of the world’s population already lived in urban areas, predicting that by 2050 this percentage would reach 68%. This trend toward greater urbanization carries with it several implications regarding environmental degradation and social inequality. According to National Geographic, urban growth increases air pollution, endangers animal populations, promotes the loss of urban tree cover, and heightens the likelihood of environmental catastrophes such as flash flooding. These health hazards and catastrophic phenomena may be more likely to impact poorer populations, as larger cities tend to demonstrate higher rates of economic inequality and uncontrolled growth tends to produce unequal distributions of space, services, and opportunities.

To mitigate these negative effects of urbanization, designers are increasingly prioritizing sustainability and the maximization of available space – allowing more people to occupy less space with a smaller footprint.

Courtesy of SeuraBatipin Flat / studioWOK. Image © Federico VillaCasa da Escrita / João Mendes Ribeiro. Image © do mal o menosStudio 45 / Marston Architects. Image © Katherine Lu+ 13

Space-Saving Solutions: 33 Creative Storage Ideas

© Hey! Cheese© Kat Lu© Hey! Cheese© Kai Nakamura+ 34

The lack of storage space is a recurrent problem in homes. In most cases, residual spaces or uncomfortable corners are used to solve the lack of shelves, drawers, and closets. To efficiently incorporate these type of spaces into your designs, here are 33 remarkable storage examples.

Creative Kitchen Designs and Their Details: The Best Photos of the Week

More and more, the kitchen is gaining importance in house design, in many cases serving as the center around which the rest of the spaces unfold. For this reason, this week we present a selection of 15 images of kitchens, from different parts of the world, which allow us to appreciate the variety of configurations, materials, and shapes now used in this important space. Read on to see the images of photographers including BoysPlayNice, Peter Bennetts, and Juane Sepulveda.

© Rena LorenzCortesía de NISHIZAWAARCHITECTS© Lisbeth Grosmann© Juane Sepulveda+ 15

Gable House / Sheri Haby Architects

© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann+ 14

Sandringham, Australia

Equestrian Buildings / Seth Stein Architects + Watson Architecture+Design

© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann+ 16

Merricks, Australia

Blackwood Street Bunker / Clare Cousins Architects

© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann+ 27

North Melbourne, Australia
  • Architects: Clare Cousins
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  75 Area:  75
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2013 Year:  2013

Flinders Lane Apartment / Clare Cousins Architects

© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann© Lisbeth Grosmann+ 14

  • Architects: Clare Cousins
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  75 Area:  75
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2013 Year:  2013