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H.G. Esch

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Oeconomicum / Ingenhoven Architects

20:00 - 14 April, 2016
Oeconomicum / Ingenhoven Architects , © H.G.Esch
© H.G.Esch

© H.G.Esch © H.G.Esch © Holger Knauf © H.G.Esch + 11

  • Architects

    Ingenhoven Architects
  • Location

    Düsseldorf, Germany
  • Category

  • Area

    5000.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2010
  • Photographs

Lanserhof Tegernsee / ingenhoven architects

01:00 - 28 August, 2014
Lanserhof Tegernsee / ingenhoven architects, Ingenhoven Architects / Photos: H.G. Esch, Hennef
Ingenhoven Architects / Photos: H.G. Esch, Hennef

Ingenhoven Architects / Photos: H.G. Esch, Hennef Ingenhoven Architects / Photos: H.G. Esch, Hennef Ingenhoven Architects / Photos: H.G. Esch, Hennef Ingenhoven Architects / Photos: H.G. Esch, Hennef + 17

Who Will Design Our Smart Cities? (Hint: Not Architects)

01:00 - 9 March, 2014
Who Will Design Our Smart Cities? (Hint: Not Architects), The New City of Songdo in South Korea. Image Courtesy of Cisco
The New City of Songdo in South Korea. Image Courtesy of Cisco

Originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Big Data, Big Questions", this article by Alex Marshall examines what is arguably the most important aspect of smart city design: not how they will be created, but who will create them. He finds that, though an apparently new phenomenon, smart cities are just like their forebears in that they are built primarily by political will, not microprocessors.

Not long ago, I bought a beetle-shaped piece of silicone and metal that slips into my pocket and keeps track of how much I walk. Called a Fitbit One, it’s essentially a glorified pedometer. The device’s shell is jammed with hard- and software that lets it talk to my computer and iPhone. It sends me attaboys! on its tiny screen and, most importantly, the gadget talks with my spouse’s Fitbit, which allows us to compete with each other.

The Fitbit is not on anyone’s list of smart-city phenomena, but I would argue for including it, because it’s changing my relationship with the streets I walk in New York City. It also illustrates the pervasiveness of smart technology, and its limitations. For all its coolness—and it is cool—my device is doing something digitally that had already been done well mechanically, and at a lower price. A lot of the smart-cities technology is like this—it’s changing how we do things, but often not what we do.

Read on for more about the changes brought about - or not brought about - by smart cities after the break

Im Zollhafen 22 / Gatermann + Schossig

01:00 - 19 February, 2014
Im Zollhafen 22 / Gatermann + Schossig, © H.G. Esch
© H.G. Esch

© H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch + 9

Henkel Asia-Pacific and China / HPP Hentrich-Petschnigg

01:00 - 23 May, 2013
Henkel Asia-Pacific and China / HPP Hentrich-Petschnigg, © H.G. Esch
© H.G. Esch

© H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch + 16

INCS Zero Factory / KPF

00:00 - 6 March, 2011
INCS Zero Factory / KPF, © H.G. Esch
© H.G. Esch

© H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch © H.G. Esch + 24

  • Architects

    Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
  • Location

    Nagano, Nagano Prefecture, Japan
  • Category

  • Client

    INCS
  • Area

    86000.0 m2
  • Photographs