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Supercharging Workflows with Real-Time Visualization Tool Twinmotion

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Forward-thinking architectural firms, infrastructure consultancies, and interior design businesses are increasingly leaning on real-time architectural visualization to explore, evaluate, and present designs. By affording clients and project stakeholders the opportunity to experience future spaces in interactive and immersive environments, real-time technology provides a compelling immediacy that 2D drawings cannot. 

6 Easy Tutorials for Better SketchUp Renders

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V-Ray is an incredibly powerful renderer — but it’s also remarkably easy to use. The number-one* 3D renderer used in architectural visualization is battle-tested and industry-proven, used daily to realize world-class products, buildings and much more. And if you like to spend the majority of your time being creative but still crave the highest quality images possible, V-Ray can help you easily and speedily render everything from your quickest concepts to your largest and most detailed 3D models.

What’s more, it works seamlessly with SketchUp’s versatile 3D modeling tools while also being built with a full set of creative tools for lights and materials. The best part, perhaps, is that you don’t need to be a rendering expert to get great results with V-Ray. This collection of six, simple, quick-start tutorials will help you learn how to use V-Ray Next for SketchUp — and give your renders a boost in no time at all.

Let’s get started!

Courtesy of Chaos Group Courtesy of Chaos Group Courtesy of Chaos Group Courtesy of Chaos Group + 7

Workspace Architecture: 15 Projects from Brasil

This month ArchDaily is exploring the topic of work, demonstrating how businesses can benefit from a good quality space: employee comfort, creativity stimulation, rest areas, brand image improvements, new talents attraction. Inspired by these topics, we selected fifteen contemporary Brazilian projects that illustrate different scales and ways of working to inspire this type of program.

Walk-in Showers Without Doors or Curtains: Design Tips and Examples

Because it doesn't include a bathtub, or require doors, screens, or curtains, the walk-in shower often makes bathrooms appear larger, cleaner, and more minimalist. 

However, some precautions must be taken when designing them. Most importantly, the shower cannot be left completely open, even if it appears to be at first glance. Most designs incorporate a tempered glass that prevents water from "bouncing" out of the shower space, subtly closing the area. When this transparent division doesn't have a frame, the appearance of fungi due to accumulation of water and moisture becomes less likely.

Casa de monte / TACO taller de arquitectura contextual. Image © Leo Espinosa Fagerstrom House / Claesson Koivisto Rune. Image © Åke E:son Lindman AUTOHAUS / Matt Fajkus Architecture. Image © Charles Davis Smith Pombal / AZO. Sequeira Arquitectos Associados. Image © Nelson Garrido + 28

Architecture and Topography: 15 Projects with Different Approaches to Relief

Sloping plots often present themselves as major challenges and therefore become a determining factor of the project by enabling various forms of approach, overlapping the ground, respecting its slope or even burying itself in it. To illustrate all these alternatives, we selected fifteen projects that present different solutions in dealing with landscape.

Spotlight: Jean Nouvel

The winner of the Wolf Prize in 2005 and the Pritzker of 2008, French architect Jean Nouvel has attempted to design each of his projects without any preconceived notions. The result is a variety of projects that, while strikingly different, always demonstrate a delicate play with light and shadow as well as a harmonious balance with their surroundings. It was this diverse approach that led the Pritzker Prize Jury in their citation to characterize Nouvel as primarily "courageous" in his "pursuit of new ideas and his challenge of accepted norms in order to stretch the boundaries of the field."

Institut du Monde Arabe. Image © Georges Fessy One Central Park. Image © Murray Fredericks Doha Office Tower, Qatar. Image © Nelson Garrido Police Headquearters & Charleroi Danses / Ateliers Jean Nouvel + MDW Architecture. Image © Filip Dujardin + 15

This Brick Arch Installation Dissolves in the Rain to Leave a Mortar Skeleton

Sometimes known as the “Island of the Gods,” Jeju Island in South Korea is characterized by its volcanic rock, stunning waterfalls, and warm, tropical climate. Here, life is integrated with nature and the architecture is in harmony with the landscape. Dissolving Arch, a weather-specific installation by stpmj, responds to the island’s tropical environment. The structure began life as a solid brick vault, which then slowly dissolved in the hot and rainy periods of Jeju to produce a light, porous skeleton made of the remaining mortar which connects people with nature.

© EH(Kyoungtae Kim) + stpmj © EH(Kyoungtae Kim) + stpmj © EH(Kyoungtae Kim) + stpmj © EH(Kyoungtae Kim) + stpmj + 20

10 Projects in Which BIM was Essential

Building Information Modeling (BIM) technology allows the design process to be organized in a structured and disciplined manner by keeping the design, model, and documentation of each project in the same file. Whether through ArchiCAD or Revit, offices increasingly migrate to this type of tool for the assistance they provide to architects. Here, we selected ten works, of different scales, that were made through BIM software.

Architecture and Education: 15 Schools Designed by Brazilian Architects

© Mateus Sá © Fernando Stankuns © Nelson Kon © Ana Mello + 31

The key to a good education lies not only in good books and the teacher's didactics. The learning environment which students attend also has a great influence on their education since the requirements for acoustic, thermal and luminous comforts, or even landscaping, directly influence the behavior and attention of the students. In Brazil, school projects can vary widely from the private sector to the public sector, yet in both cases, it is possible to find high-quality solutions.

Before and After: How Graphic Design Interventions Enhance Built Architecture

The perception of space and the way a building is perceived within its surroundings are always primary concerns when designing an architectural project. In order to meet these interests, a graphic intervention project can become a great ally to an architect, turning the building into a landmark which allows passers-by to interpret it more clearly.

This Innovative Cooling Installation Fights Soaring Temperatures in New Delhi

This installation is a bespoke attempt to simplify and reinterpret the concept of air-conditioning, understanding that standardized solutions may not be universally applicable given the constraints of cost and surrounding environment. Using computational technologies, the team at Ant Studio has reinterpreted traditional evaporative cooling techniques to build a prototype of cylindrical clay cones, each with a custom design and size.

© S. Anirudh © S. Anirudh © S. Anirudh © S. Anirudh + 17

10 Exemplary Ways to Represent Architectonic Construction Details

The visual presentation of a project, which architects are responsible for, must effectively communicate and analyze the organization of the project's material elements. This essential creative process allows those involved to effectively identify and even modify key aspects and components of the building during all phases of its conception.

Because of the inherent challenges of material selection and other practical issues, the development of what exactly will be built tends to be relegated to the end of the design process. But a true understanding of minor yet invaluable details is among the most interesting and important aspects of the best architectural projects.

In our search for the most outstanding recent examples of construction detail representations, we've collected a series of ten drawings that celebrate different styles and approaches.

*Editor's note: the following article was written by an editor of ArchDaily in Spanish. Some project descriptions mentioned have not yet been translated into English, but we are actively working to make this information available to our global readers. 

Spotlight: Jane Jacobs

Jane Jacobs, then chairperson of a civic group in Greenwich Village, at a press conference in 1961. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jane_Jacobs.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a>, photograph by Phil Stanziola (Public Domain)
Jane Jacobs, then chairperson of a civic group in Greenwich Village, at a press conference in 1961. Image via Wikimedia, photograph by Phil Stanziola (Public Domain)

Throughout her career, social activist and urban writer Jane Jacobs (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) fought against corporate globalization and urged post-war urban planners and developers to remember the importance of community and the human scale. Despite having no formal training, she radically changed urban planning policy through the power of observation and personal experience. Her theories on how design can affect community and creativity continue to hold relevance today—influencing everything from the design of mega-cities to tiny office spaces.

10 Ideas for Presenting Your Project With Concrete Models

Physical models have, for centuries, been a highly-effective way of explaining an architectural idea, allowing the audience to experience a concept in a plan, section, elevation and perspective all at once. However, a model can communicate so much more if you deviate from traditional cardboard materiality. If you want to express the monolithic massing of your latest scheme, or its expressive texture, then a model of plaster or cement may capture so much more than a digital rendering ever could.

Creating a concrete model is profoundly engaging, as it forces us to follow a methodology similar to that of large-scale construction: make a mold / formwork, mix the cement or plaster with water, and then pour. When done correctly, the resulting model could stand as an architectural sculpture in its own right. 

Below, we have rounded up concrete models from the ArchDaily archives, giving you the inspiration to set your concrete model ideas in stone. 

The Freehand Sketches of Pritzker Prize Winners

Sketches are the first inkling into the design process of an architect, a way of observing and investigating a project’s development or even representing solutions for it. Through an architect’s sketches, one can better understand how a specific design move mirrors echoes throughout an entire work. Here, we have compiled sketches by Pritzker Prize winners - designers who have been awarded the highest recognization in the field of architecture - offering diverse techniques that can certainly inspire your next freehand experiment.

Architecture and Embroidery: Discover the Art of Elin Petronella and Charles Henry

Elin Petronella and Charles Henry record the architecture and urban landscapes of European cities on vibrant, colorful, and even monochromatic embroideries. Classical Danish buildings, the bohemian streets of Paris, Lisbon's cable cars, and even the iconic Casa Batlló de Gaudí in Barcelona are some of the locations illustrated in the duo's work. See more of the textile artists/couple's work on Instagram: @petronella.art and @_charleshenry_.

Solve Complex Architectural Details With This 'Contour Duplicator Gauge'

Most of the materials that we use in the construction of our projects have shapes and dimensions that seek to facilitate their storage, transfer, and installation, being constituted in its majority by orthogonal modulations. These straight angles don't always fit with the irregularity of our designs, nor do they coincide exactly when encountering more organic materials or other specific elements such as ducts, pillars, or furniture.

This simple tool allows you to copy, duplicate, and measure complex contours so that the materials adapt perfectly to other elements. Its mobile 'teeth' must be pressed against the profile to obtain a mold of its shape, generating templates that will allow cutting and adjusting the original material with precision. Thus, the tool could even be useful for replicating or repairing unique details in restorations or refurbishments.

From Digital to Built: Six Experimentations With Brick

Argentine firm Estudio Arzubialde and Chilean architect Verónica Arcos led a Material Experimentation Workshop in Rosario, Argentina, during which six different groups of students designed and built projects using a variety of brick laying techniques.

Each project used different brick patterns based on simple rules, resulting in a structure with a certain degree of geometric complexity. 

© TEM 2015 © TEM 2015 © TEM 2015 © TEM 2015 + 38

This is How a Complex Brick Wall is Built Using Augmented Reality

Fusing augmented reality with the physical space, Fologram seeks to facilitate the construction of complex designs (for example, parametric designs that require a series of measurements, verification, and specific care) through digital instructions that are virtually superimposed into the workspace, directing a step-by-step guide for bricklayers during the construction process.

'Research institutions and large companies are working with industrial robots to automate these challenging construction tasks. However, robots aren’t well-suited for unpredictable construction environments, and even the most sophisticated computer vision algorithms cannot match the intuition and skill of a trained bricklayer,' stated their creators.

Cortesía de Fologram Cortesía de Fologram Cortesía de Fologram Cortesía de Fologram + 9

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