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Beyond Straight Lines: Curves in Brazilian Houses

Beyond Straight Lines: Curves in Brazilian Houses

Casa Boipeba / daarchitectes. Photo: © Michel Rey PhotographeCauman House / Estúdio BRA. Photo: © Pedro KokLLF House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson KonSapucaí-Mirim House / APBA – Arquiteto Paulo Bastos e Associados. Photo: © Daniel Ducci+ 22

Modern architecture, in its early days, was based on innovative technologies of construction and a rejection of ornament, which established the use of straight lines in building design. However, thanks to the plasticity of concrete and other materials, new patterns began to emerge, resulting in more organic and curvy lines.

Whether for visual effects or more technical reasons such as better adjusting to the terrain, curved elements certainly provide a unique perception of the space, both from the outside and from the inside. We have listed here seven contemporary Brazilian houses that stand out for using this feature.

In the Boipeba House, designed by daarchitectes, the plasticity of the concrete allowed for a more organic layout that creates a more subtle dialogue with the surrounding natural landscape.

Casa Boipeba / daarchitectes. Photo: © Michel Rey Photographe
Casa Boipeba / daarchitectes. Photo: © Michel Rey Photographe
Floor Plan - Casa Boipeba / daarchitectes
Floor Plan - Casa Boipeba / daarchitectes
Casa Boipeba / daarchitectes. Photo: © Michel Rey Photographe
Casa Boipeba / daarchitectes. Photo: © Michel Rey Photographe

The architectural program of the Sapucaí-Mirim House, by APBA - Arquiteto Paulo Bastos e Associados, is organized in three blocks at ground level, adopting curved plans that articulate the spaces through passages that are sometimes open and sometimes closed, spreading the buildings throughout the terrain to make the most of the amazing landscape.

Sapucaí-Mirim House / APBA – Arquiteto Paulo Bastos e Associados. Photo: © Daniel Ducci
Sapucaí-Mirim House / APBA – Arquiteto Paulo Bastos e Associados. Photo: © Daniel Ducci
Floor Plan - Sapucaí-Mirim House / APBA – Arquiteto Paulo Bastos e Associados
Floor Plan - Sapucaí-Mirim House / APBA – Arquiteto Paulo Bastos e Associados
Sapucaí-Mirim House / APBA – Arquiteto Paulo Bastos e Associados. Photo: © Daniel Ducci
Sapucaí-Mirim House / APBA – Arquiteto Paulo Bastos e Associados. Photo: © Daniel Ducci

For the House in Gonçalves, by André Vainer Arquitetos, the main goal was to preserve the original contour lines of the terrain and optimize cut & fill earthwork, hence the slightly curved shape.

Residência em Gonçalves / André Vainer Arquitetos. Photo: © Tuca Reines
Residência em Gonçalves / André Vainer Arquitetos. Photo: © Tuca Reines
Floor Plan - Residência em Gonçalves / André Vainer Arquitetos
Floor Plan - Residência em Gonçalves / André Vainer Arquitetos
Residência em Gonçalves / André Vainer Arquitetos. Photo: © Tuca Reines
Residência em Gonçalves / André Vainer Arquitetos. Photo: © Tuca Reines

The architectural firm Obra Arquitetos has two outstanding residential projects that adopt curved lines to improve the quality of life for their residents. The LEnS House features an inner courtyard that allows visual contact between the rooms, bringing residents closer to each other. A curved glass panel creates a seamless view of this patio, allowing the residents to enjoy nature and the changing seasons.

LEnS House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson Kon
LEnS House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson Kon
Floor Plan - LEnS House / Obra Arquitetos
Floor Plan - LEnS House / Obra Arquitetos
LEnS House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson Kon
LEnS House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson Kon

The second example is the LLF House, which features a winding flat roof that covers the laundry area, garage, and living spaces, all of which are open to the outside. This element, together with a few structural walls, creates an open space for cooking, living, and relaxation, with no strict boundaries, so that users can enjoy the environment with freedom, spaciousness, and maximum interaction between all spaces.

LLF House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson Kon
LLF House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson Kon
Floor Plan - LLF House / Obra Arquitetos
Floor Plan - LLF House / Obra Arquitetos
LLF House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson Kon
LLF House / Obra Arquitetos. Photo: © Nelson Kon

The Cauman House by Estúdio BRA required a garden that could be used as a space for musical presentations. To highlight this area, the house is covered by a flat roof with straight outside edges and an organically shaped hole in the center. This creates a transition between the garden, which has a fluid and organic design, and the upper floor, consisting of a clearly man-made white cube with rectangular windows.

Cauman House / Estúdio BRA. Photo: © Pedro Kok
Cauman House / Estúdio BRA. Photo: © Pedro Kok
Floor Plan - Cauman House / Estúdio BRA
Floor Plan - Cauman House / Estúdio BRA
Cauman House / Estúdio BRA. Photo: © Pedro Kok
Cauman House / Estúdio BRA. Photo: © Pedro Kok

Finally, Mareines Arquitetura + Patalano Arquitetura created the Pinhão House inspired by pine seeds, which stands out for its welcoming sinuosity that seems to weave through the trees and winds. The inhabitants are embraced by ramps instead of staircases, and sculptural passages instead of corridors, transforming the sensorial experience with each step.

Pinhão House / Mareines Arquitetura + Patalano Arquitetura. Photo: © Leonardo Finotti
Pinhão House / Mareines Arquitetura + Patalano Arquitetura. Photo: © Leonardo Finotti
Floor Plan - Pinhão House / Mareines Arquitetura + Patalano Arquitetura
Floor Plan - Pinhão House / Mareines Arquitetura + Patalano Arquitetura
Pinhão House / Mareines Arquitetura + Patalano Arquitetura. Photo: © Leonardo Finotti
Pinhão House / Mareines Arquitetura + Patalano Arquitetura. Photo: © Leonardo Finotti

Editor's note: the project descriptions are based on the texts provided by the authors.

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Cite: Equipe ArchDaily Brasil. "Beyond Straight Lines: Curves in Brazilian Houses" [Além da reta: linhas curvas em 7 casas brasileiras] 11 May 2021. ArchDaily. (Trans. Duduch, Tarsila) Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/960506/beyond-straight-lines-curves-in-brazilian-houses> ISSN 0719-8884

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