We are currently in Beta version and updating this search on a regular basis. We’d love to hear your feedback here.

Europe's Brutalist Churches and Chapels, by Stefano Perego

Europe's Brutalist Churches and Chapels, by Stefano Perego

Parochial Church of the Resurrection of Christ, by architects Günther Domenig and Eilfried Huth. Oberwart, Austria. (1966-1969). Image © Stefano PeregoNational Temple of Mary, Mother and Queen, also known as the Monte Grisa Sanctuary, by architect Antonio Guacci. Trieste, Italy (1963-1965). Image © Stefano PeregoCathedral of Saint Buenaventura, by architect Miroslav Matasović. Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina (1972-1973). The clock tower was added between 1990-1991. Image © Stefano PeregoCathedral of Christ the King, by architects Adalberto Libera and Cesare Galeazzi. La Spezia, Italy (1956-1975). Image © Stefano Perego+ 22

Rich in symbolism and tradition, religious architecture has always been marked by the grandiosity and extravagance of its interior spaces. For the architects and designers who created these spaces, everything from the scale, to the materials, to the lighting were tools to be used in optimizing their form and function and creating a place for users to connect with their faith.

Whether seen in churches, mosques, synagogues, temples, or chapels, religious architecture has always abided by certain historical patterns; however, this doesn't mean that it was free from the influence of other architectural styles that defined different eras of history. 

Religious buildings shaped by Brutalism--a scion of the Modernist Movement that had its heyday between the 1950s and 1970s--stand out thanks to their constructive sincerity, geometry, and the roughness of their surfaces. Reinforced concrete shaped by rugged wooden framework is the principal material used in Brutalist structures to create the rough, untreated surfaces that define the movement.

Seeking to trace Brutalism's influence throughout European architecture, photographer Stefano Perego has compiled photographs of religious architecture --churches, temples, and sanctuaries--designed in the Brutalist tradition. In this article, we highlight 20 Brutalist works of architecture from throughout Europe--Germany, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, France, Italy, and Switzerland --designed by the likes of Le Corbusier, Gottfried Böhm, Arrigo Arrighetti, Adalberto Libera, Léon Stynen, Juliaan Lampens, and Fritz Schaller, among others:

Germany

 St. Hildegardis Chapel / Gottfried Böhm

  • Year: 1962-1970
  • Location: Düsseldorf, Germany

St. Hildegardis Church, by architect Gottfried Böhm. Düsseldorf, Germany (1962-1970). Image © Stefano Perego
St. Hildegardis Church, by architect Gottfried Böhm. Düsseldorf, Germany (1962-1970). Image © Stefano Perego

Pilgrimage Church / Gottfried Böhm

  • Year: 1963-1968
  • Location: Velbert, Germany

Church of the Pilgrimage, by architect Gottfried Böhm. Velbert, Germany (1963-1968). Image © Stefano Perego
Church of the Pilgrimage, by architect Gottfried Böhm. Velbert, Germany (1963-1968). Image © Stefano Perego

St. Paulus Church / Fritz Schaller

  • Year: 1966-1968
  • Location: Neuss, Germany

St. Paulus Church, by architect Fritz Schaller. Neuss, Germany (1966-1968). Image © Stefano Perego
St. Paulus Church, by architect Fritz Schaller. Neuss, Germany (1966-1968). Image © Stefano Perego

Johannes XXIII Church / Heinz Buchmann + Josef Rikus

  • Year: 1968
  • Location: Cologne, Germany

Johannes XXIII Church, by architect Heinz Buchmann and sculptor Josef Rikus. Cologne, Germany (1968). Image © Stefano Perego
Johannes XXIII Church, by architect Heinz Buchmann and sculptor Josef Rikus. Cologne, Germany (1968). Image © Stefano Perego

Christi Auferstehung Church / Gottfried Böhm

  • Year: 1968-1970
  • Location: Cologne, Germany

Christi Auferstehung Church, by architect Gottfried Böhm. Cologne, Germany (1968-1970). Image © Stefano Perego
Christi Auferstehung Church, by architect Gottfried Böhm. Cologne, Germany (1968-1970). Image © Stefano Perego

Austria

Parochial Church of the Resurrection of Christ / Günther Domenig + Eilfried Huth

  • Year: 1966-1969
  • Location: Oberwart, Austria

Parochial Church of the Resurrection of Christ, by architects Günther Domenig and Eilfried Huth. Oberwart, Austria. (1966-1969). Image © Stefano Perego
Parochial Church of the Resurrection of Christ, by architects Günther Domenig and Eilfried Huth. Oberwart, Austria. (1966-1969). Image © Stefano Perego

Zur Heiligsten Dreifaltigkeit Church / Fritz Wotruba + Fritz Gerhard Mayr 

  • Year: 1974-1976
  • Location: Vienna, Austria

Kirche Zur Heiligsten Dreifaltigkeit (Church of the Holy Trinity), also known as Wotruba Church, by sculptor Fritz Wotruba and architect Fritz Gerhard Mayr. Vienna, Austria (1974-1976). Image © Stefano Perego
Kirche Zur Heiligsten Dreifaltigkeit (Church of the Holy Trinity), also known as Wotruba Church, by sculptor Fritz Wotruba and architect Fritz Gerhard Mayr. Vienna, Austria (1974-1976). Image © Stefano Perego

Belgium

Kerselare Chapel / Juliaan Lampens

  • Year: 1961-1966
  • Location: Oudenaarde, Belgium

Kerselare Chapel, by architect Juliaan Lampens. Oudenaarde, Belgium (1961-1966). Image © Stefano Perego
Kerselare Chapel, by architect Juliaan Lampens. Oudenaarde, Belgium (1961-1966). Image © Stefano Perego

 Sint-Ritakerk Church / Léon Stynen + Paul De Meyer

  • Year: 1963-1966
  • Loation: Harelbeke, Belgium

Sint-Ritakerk Church, by architects Léon Stynen and Paul De Meyer. Harelbeke, Belgium (1963-1966). Image © Stefano Perego
Sint-Ritakerk Church, by architects Léon Stynen and Paul De Meyer. Harelbeke, Belgium (1963-1966). Image © Stefano Perego

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Saint Buenaventura Cathedral / Miroslav Matasović

  • Year: 1972-1973
  • Location: Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Cathedral of Saint Buenaventura, by architect Miroslav Matasović. Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina (1972-1973). The clock tower was added between 1990-1991. Image © Stefano Perego
Cathedral of Saint Buenaventura, by architect Miroslav Matasović. Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina (1972-1973). The clock tower was added between 1990-1991. Image © Stefano Perego

Monastery of Our Lady of Health (Crkva Gospe od Zdravlja)

  • Year: 1990-1994
  • Location: Neum, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Crkva Gospe od Zdravlja. Neum, Bosnia y Herzegovina (1990-1994). Image © Stefano Perego
Crkva Gospe od Zdravlja. Neum, Bosnia y Herzegovina (1990-1994). Image © Stefano Perego

France

Church of Saint Peter / Le Corbusier 

  • Year: 1963
  • Location: Firminy, France

Church of Saint Peter, by architect Le Corbusier. Firminy, France (1963). After remaining unfinished for many years, it was completed in 2006 by architect José Oubrerie. Image © Stefano Perego
Church of Saint Peter, by architect Le Corbusier. Firminy, France (1963). After remaining unfinished for many years, it was completed in 2006 by architect José Oubrerie. Image © Stefano Perego

Church of Saint John / Maurice Blanc

  • Year: 1963-1965
  • Location: Grenoble, France

Church of Saint John, by architect Maurice Blanc. Grenoble, France (1963-1965). Image © Stefano Perego
Church of Saint John, by architect Maurice Blanc. Grenoble, France (1963-1965). Image © Stefano Perego

Italy

Church of Christ the Redeemer / Nicola and Leonardo Mosso + Livio Norzi

  • Year: 1954-1957
  • Location: Turin, Italy

Church of Christ the Redeemer, by architects Nicola and Leonardo Mosso with Livio Norzi. Turin, Italy (1954-1957). Image © Stefano Perego
Church of Christ the Redeemer, by architects Nicola and Leonardo Mosso with Livio Norzi. Turin, Italy (1954-1957). Image © Stefano Perego

Cathedral of Christ the King / Adalberto Libera + Cesare Galeazzi

  • Year: 1956-1975
  • Location: La Spezia, Italy

Cathedral of Christ the King, by architects Adalberto Libera and Cesare Galeazzi. La Spezia, Italy (1956-1975). Image © Stefano Perego
Cathedral of Christ the King, by architects Adalberto Libera and Cesare Galeazzi. La Spezia, Italy (1956-1975). Image © Stefano Perego

Monte Grisa Sanctuary / Antonio Guacci

  • Year: 1963-1965
  • Location: Trieste, Italy

National Temple of Mary, Mother and Queen, also known as the Monte Grisa Sanctuary, by architect Antonio Guacci. Trieste, Italy (1963-1965). Image © Stefano Perego
National Temple of Mary, Mother and Queen, also known as the Monte Grisa Sanctuary, by architect Antonio Guacci. Trieste, Italy (1963-1965). Image © Stefano Perego

San Giovanni Bono Church / Arrigo Arrighetti

  • Year: 1968
  • Location: Milan, Italy

Church of Saint Giovanni Bono, by architect Arrigo Arrighetti. Milan, Italy (1968). Image © Stefano Perego
Church of Saint Giovanni Bono, by architect Arrigo Arrighetti. Milan, Italy (1968). Image © Stefano Perego

Church of Saint Paul the Apostle / Benvenuto Villa + Maria Rosa Zibetti Ribaldone

  • Year: 1971-1973
  • Location: Gallarate, Italy

Church of Saint Paul the Apostle, by architects Benvenuto Villa and Maria Rosa Zibetti Ribaldone. Gallarate, Italy (1971-1973). Image © Stefano Perego
Church of Saint Paul the Apostle, by architects Benvenuto Villa and Maria Rosa Zibetti Ribaldone. Gallarate, Italy (1971-1973). Image © Stefano Perego

Church of Saint Mary of Carmine / Gianni Lamedica

  • Year: 1979-1981
  • Location: Fossombrone, Italy

Church of Saint Mary of Carmine,by architect Gianni Lamedica. Fossombrone, Italy (1979-1981). Image © Stefano Perego
Church of Saint Mary of Carmine,by architect Gianni Lamedica. Fossombrone, Italy (1979-1981). Image © Stefano Perego

Switzerland

Heiligkreuzkirche / Walter Förderer

  • Year: 1966-1969
  • Location: Chur, Switzerland

Heiligkreuzkirche, by architect Walter Förderer. Chur, Switzerland (1966-1969). Image © Stefano Perego
Heiligkreuzkirche, by architect Walter Förderer. Chur, Switzerland (1966-1969). Image © Stefano Perego

Stefano Perego (1984) is an architectural photographer based in Milan, Italy. He collaborates frequently with architectural studios as well as artists and is the co-author of the book SOVIET ASIA (Modern Soviet Architecture of Central Asia). His interest in architecture of the second half of the 20th century has been the focal point of his photography capturing Modernist, Brutalist, and Postmodernist works. 

Image gallery

See allShow less
About this author
Cite: Maiztegui, Belén. "Europe's Brutalist Churches and Chapels, by Stefano Perego" [Brutalismo en Iglesias y Capillas de Europa, por Stefano Perego] 02 Dec 2020. ArchDaily. (Trans. Johnson, Maggie) Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/952055/europes-brutalist-churches-and-chapels-by-stefano-perego> ISSN 0719-8884
Church of Christ the Redeemer, by architects Nicola and Leonardo Mosso with Livio Norzi. Turin, Italy (1954-1957). Image © Stefano Perego

摄影作品:欧洲粗野主义教堂 / Stefano Perego

You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.