the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
Navigate articles using your keyboard
  1. ArchDaily
  2. News
  3. New York City’s Proposal for the Missing Green-Link in Midtown

New York City’s Proposal for the Missing Green-Link in Midtown

New York City’s Proposal for the Missing Green-Link in Midtown
New York City’s Proposal for the Missing Green-Link in Midtown, Courtesy of wHY
Courtesy of wHY

The city of New York is connecting all 32-miles of coastline with public amenities, piece by piece. To link the East River’s greenways, the interdisciplinary practice, wHY has submitted an RFP to the New York City Economic Development Corporation for the 1.1-mile long coastal stretch.

The landscape and urban design workshop as part of wHY -- wHY GROUNDS, has tackled the linear site, stretching from 53rd to 61st street, encompassing 1.72-acres of public space. The site is exceptional with its views to Roosevelt Island, the Queensborough Bridge, the Queens/Brooklyn waterfront and down to Lower Manhattan.

Courtesy of wHY
Courtesy of wHY

We need imaginative responses to public space in cities across America, and New York is no exception. Connecting to the bodies of water surrounding us and enhancing our relationship to the East River is critical to our reality now and our future of resilience, culture and biodiversity, comments Mark Thomann, wHY GROUNDS Director regarding the importance of the site.

Courtesy of wHY
Courtesy of wHY

The wHY GROUNDS proposal is driven by the concept of “Three Layers of meaning: Social, Botanical, Cultural” which is executed with an abundant variety of experiences. The design, led by wHY GROUNDS Director and landscape and urban design professor Mark Thomann, ASLA, maintains the linearity of the site. In contrast to the linear plan, the project makes sectional explorations that revolve around two lanes -- the slow-lane for plantings and pedestrians and the fast-lane for bikes and runners. Grafted onto these two lanes the plan undulates and creates outdoor rooms, allowing for a varied program, places to rest, a chance to appreciate the views and experience atypical adjacencies.

Courtesy of wHY
Courtesy of wHY

Courtesy of wHY Courtesy of wHY Courtesy of wHY Courtesy of wHY + 11

wHY GROUNDS has explored how the slopes of their proposal can filter noise to enhance the opportunities for the cultural component of the concept. The outdoor rooms are flexible spaces for temporary, pop-up, and permanent programming, from street artists to special events. One of the initial cultural events is the ART LANE artist program, where artists will come together to paint the bicycle lanes.

Courtesy of wHY
Courtesy of wHY

With ecological awareness at the forefront of thought, wHY GROUNDS’ approach builds on New York City’s vision of reduced emissions. Healthy habitats will thrive below the undulating decks with native, riparian, and river edge plantings. Both above and below the decks, the landscaping palette is designed to balance maintenance, water, shading, and provide biodiversity.

Courtesy of wHY
Courtesy of wHY

This East Midtown greenway proposal is thoughtful in its design to address the needs of the communities it will serve, and the landscape it will restore to the public. The programmatic function of being able to generate revenue to maintain the park, along with low maintenance planting helps to ensure the success and longevity of this seventy-million dollar proposal.

News via: wHY.

View the complete gallery

About this author
Samantha Buckley
Author
Cite: Samantha Buckley. "New York City’s Proposal for the Missing Green-Link in Midtown" 26 Oct 2017. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/881987/new-york-citys-proposal-for-the-missing-green-link-in-midtown/> ISSN 0719-8884
Read comments