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  1. ArchDaily
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  3. Richard Rogers Appeals for Public Support to Save Robin Hood Gardens from Demolition

Richard Rogers Appeals for Public Support to Save Robin Hood Gardens from Demolition

Richard Rogers Appeals for Public Support to Save Robin Hood Gardens from Demolition
Richard Rogers Appeals for Public Support to Save Robin Hood Gardens from Demolition, Robin Hood Gardens / Alison and Peter Smithson
Robin Hood Gardens / Alison and Peter Smithson

When it was announced in 2012 that London's Robin Hood Gardens – Alison and Peter Smithson's world-famous Brutalist housing estate – was to be demolished, there was outrage among the architectural community. Since then, many have called for the profession to act in order to protect "one of Britain’s most important post-war housing projects," which led to a fresh bid to save the scheme in March of this year. Richard Rogers, Simon Smithson (a partner at RSHP and son of Alison and Peter Smithson), and academic Dirk van den Heuvel have now called upon members of the public to voice their concerns to the UK Ministry for Culture, Media and Sport, before the end of the week:

"Previous efforts in 2009 to have the building listed failed, but the case has now been re-opened and we understand that the new Minister for Sport, Tourism and Heritage will be reviewing the arguments at the end of this week [w/c 15th June 2015]."

© Steve Cadman
© Steve Cadman

According to Rogers and Smithson Robin Hood Gardens "offers generously-sized flats that could be refurbished [and] are of outstanding architectural quality and significant historic interest." They continue: "the public appreciation and understanding of the value of modernist architecture has grown over the past five years, making the case for listing stronger than ever. The UK's 20th Century Society has submitted a paper setting out why they believe Robin Hood Gardens should be formally 'listed' (i.e. added it to the statutory list of buildings of special architectural and historical interest)." In addition, Dr. Dirk van den Heuvel (TUDelft, The Netherlands) and Lord Rogers have added their own separate assessments of why they believe that the buildings should not be demolished:

"Alison and Peter Smithson were the inventors of the New Brutalism in the 1950s and as such they were the ‘bellwethers of the young' as Reyner Banham called them. In many ways [Robin Hood Gardens] epitomizes the Smithsons’ ideas of housing and city building. Two sculptural slabs of affordable housing create the calm and stress free place amidst the ongoing modernization of the London cityscape.

The façades of precast concrete elements act as screens that negotiate between the private sphere of the individual flats and the collective space of the inner garden and beyond. The rhythmic composition of vertical fins and horizontal ’streets-in-the-air' articulates the Smithsons’ unique proposition of an architectural language that combines social values with modern technology and material expression. Despite the current state of neglect and abuse Robin Hood Gardens comprises a rare, majestic gesture, both radical and generous in its aspiration for an architecture of human association. As such it still sets an example for architects around the world." Dr. Dirk van den Heuvel

"The Smithsons were clearly great architects: the Economist Building, completed in 1964 and Grade I-listed in 1988, is without a doubt the best modern building in the historic centre of London. Robin Hood Gardens, which pioneered ‘streets in the air’ to preserve the public life of the East End terraces that it replaced, was the next large-scale job that the Smithsons embarked upon. It was architecturally and intellectually innovative.  In my opinion, it is the most important social housing development from the post-war era in Britain." Richard Rogers, Baron Rogers of Riverside

Smithson and Rogers recommend interested members of the public to contact Tracey Crouch MP (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Sport, Tourism and Heritage) to express their concerns. Contact details for the Ministry for Culture, Media and Sport can be found here.

Read about Robin Hood Garden's recent history here, or find out more about the project:

AD Classics: Robin Hood Gardens / The Smithsons

Cite: James Taylor. "Richard Rogers Appeals for Public Support to Save Robin Hood Gardens from Demolition" 18 Jun 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/643565/richard-rogers-appeals-for-public-support-to-save-robin-hood-gardens-from-demolition/> ISSN 0719-8884
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