BIG Designs Rejected Again for Kimball Art Center

Revised design for the Kimball Art Center. Image Courtesy of

After producing major revisions on a previously rejected design, BIG have had their second design rejected for the Kimball Art Center in Park City, Utah. City Hall rejected the design on the basis of appearance, arguing that it did not relate to the historic city centre “aesthetically, visually or historically.” The second design by BIG marked a complete departure from the original that was selected as the winner of an architectural contest hosted by the Kimball Art Center.

Did Park City Blow It With BIG’s Kimball Art Center?

The original design for the Kimball Art Center. Image Courtesy of ()

In an entertaining take on the events that led BIG to completely redesign their winning competition entry for the Kimball Art Center in Park City, Utah, Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan describes the new design as “ridiculously anonymous,” “a huge — and almost hilarious — departure from the personality and warmth of the original design.” She asks the residents of Park City, whose outrage forced the redesign, “are you happy now?” Read the full article here.

Utah to Eliminate Homelessness With Entirely Logical Solution

ELEMENTAL has developed a system in which half of each building would be constructed in a first phase – and the other half in a later second phase: allowing residents to incrementally invest in their own homes, made possible through public funding. Image Courtesy of ELEMENTAL

Despite rising poverty across the US, homelessness has decreased 69% in over the past five years and is even expected to be eliminated this year, the Huffington Post reports. How has Utah found such success? By giving the homeless homes. While the answer may seem obvious, Utah is breaking ground with its Housing Works program, which gives the homeless affordable and permanent apartments on just one condition: that they be “good stewards.”

The premise, which puts much trust in the homeowner, reminds us of ELEMENTAL’s “half-finished” philosophy and makes us wonder: if homes can eliminate homelessness in the short term, could conscientiously-designed homes (which can encourage good stewardship) be necessary to eliminate homelessness in the long term?

Read more on Utah’s program at the Huffington Post and let us know what you think in the comments below.

SixtyNine-Seventy, The Spaces Between: An Urban Ideas Competition

Courtesy of

Organized by AIA Utah Young Architects Forum and the Downtown Alliance, in collaboration with Heritage Foundation, Sixty-Nine Seventy invites design teams from around the world to re-envision the circulation areas and passages of two blocks in Salt Lake City’s downtown. The entrants will prepare comprehensive ideas for these in-between spaces, developing them into the connective tissue linking the area’s cultural amenities. SixtyNine-Seventy, The Spaces Between: An Urban Ideas Competition launches on January 10, 2013 with a party at 7:00 PM at Squatters Pub. The competition and launch party are open to everyone. For those not able to attend the opening night presentations will be posted on the web immediately following the event. For more information, please visit here.

Buddhist Retreat / Imbue Design

© Imbue Design

Architects: Imbue Design
Location: Torrey, ,
Structural Engineer: Shen Engineering
General Contractor: Fordham Construction
Area: 1,350 sq ft
Year: 2012
Photographs: Imbue Design

Summit Series’ New Village Will Be A Hub For Innovation

Summit Series, a popular conference that TechCrunch describes as “Part Burning-Man, Part TED,” has just acquired 10,000 acres outside of , where they hope to develop a “500-home village to foster startups, artists, thinkers, and nonprofits who will build their own version of utopia.”

Summit Series began as a way for young, socially-conscious entrepreneurs across all types of industries to gather, brainstorm ways to make their business/non-profit better, and partake in fun activities; however, it soon gained prominence as notable keynote speakers (from Richard Branson to Bill Clinton) began joining in and spreading the word.

The idea behind the purchase is to offer a more permanent-home base for the innovative conference-goers, who usually only meet for 4 days a year, so they can network and “think ” 365 days a year. It will be the built expression of the collaboration and innovation that the Summit Series aims to inspire (think Silicon Valley tucked up in the Mountains). As Summit Series investor Tim Chang explains: “The community portion — the networking, the people — that could be even more valuable than just the straight return on investment for a vacation property.”

According to TechCrunch, “every aspect of the new village will be open to social experimentation,” which leads us to wonder – which architect would be best suited to design this hyper-social village of young innovators? Perhaps BIG or Michel Rojkind Arquitectos? Let us know who you’d like to see design this utopian village in the comments below.

Story via TechCrunch 

Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects to design Utah Performing Arts Center

Site via the Performing Arts Center Website

is about to get a new, state-of-the-art performing arts center designed by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects (PCPA), in collaboration with . The 2,500-seat venue “will capture the spirit of its place” and serve as the region’s premier entertainment venue, while anchoring a vibrant arts district on the city’s main street downtown.

The selection committee of the Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City chose the PCPA/HKS team from a competitive pool that included designers of some of the most prestigious theaters in the world. “We are honored to be selected to design the Utah Performing Arts Center,” said Cesar Pelli, senior principal of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. “Salt Lake City’s attractive downtown, vibrant cultural life, and wonderful views will all shape our design for what will be an important new venue for the entire city and state.”

The Utah Performing Arts Center will be designed to attract first-run touring Broadway shows and concerts, while providing an additional venues for Utah performance groups, such as Ballet West and Utah Opera.

Design of the project is expected to take about a year, with construction planned to begin in December 2013 and the opening of the theater projected for March 2016.

The Connecticut-based firm, PCPA, has extensive experience in designing world-class theaters, including the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County, Overture Center for the Arts in Madison (Wisconsin), and the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall and Samueli Theater in Orange County (California).

Reference: Reuters, Utah Performing Arts Center, SLC’s Desert News

Pasture Project / Imbue Design

Courtesy of

Architects: Imbue Design
Location: Holladay, Utah,
Contractor: Benchmark Modern
Engineer: Shen Engineering
Area: 2,850 sqft
Completion: December 2011
Photographs: Courtesy of Imbue Design

 

BIG wins competition for the new Kimball Art Center in Park City

©

BIG has just been announced as the winner of the competition for the new Kimball Art Center in Park City, Utah. The non-profit community center for the visual arts, which started in 1976, invites people to experience art through education, exhibitions and events. The aging historic building (dated from 1929) was in need of restoration and an addition that could allow the organization to increase their educational outreach and enhance the quality and scale of the exhibitions, while maintaining free admission to the public.

The competition’s shortlist included some of the (in my opinion) best firms in the US these days: BIG (actually Danish, but with an office in NY, which in a way “landed” in the US with several ongoing projects), Brooks + ScarpaSparano + Mooney ArchitectureTod Williams and Billie Tsien Architects, and Will Bruder + Partners LTD

You can check BIG’s proposal previously featured at ArchDaily, a project that stood out not only in formal aspects, but because of its connection with the history that the Kimball Art Center has represented.

Natural History Museum of Utah / Ennead Architects

© Jeff Goldberg/Esto

Architect: Ennead Architects
Architect of Record: GSBS Architects
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Jeff Goldberg/EstoStuart RuckmanBen Lowry

Kimball Art Center / Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects

Courtesy of Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects

Rather than trying to compete with the sublime landscape of , New York City based Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects chose to create a building that framed the views and contained a perspective from which to appreciate the alpine landscape.  This design is one of five proposals for the transformation of the Kimball Art Center in Park City.

More on this proposal after the break.

Kimball Art Center / Will Bruder+PARTNERS

Courtesy of Will Bruder and Partners

The Kimball Art Center design proposal by Will Bruder+PARTNERS focuses on the nature of “exhibition” in the context of history. Taking a cue from the “colorful prehistoric petroglyphs and pictographs” of ’s canyons along with its abundance of formally expressive Victorian architecture, the proposal takes on the role of expression and education through color and craft. This sensitivity to the history and propogation of exhibition is instantly understood with the facade walls of Main and Heber Streets.

Follow us after the break for more…

Kimball Art Center / Sparano + Mooney Architecture

Courtesy of

The Kimball Art Center in Park City, is hosting a competition for a transformation of the “non-profit center for the arts in the heart of Park City’s historic and vibrant art community”. The list of architects competing to transform this cultural space is selective.  Among them is Sparano + Mooney Architecture, an internationally recognized firm with offices in Park City, Utah and Los Angeles, California.   The competition submissions for Stage II will be presented on February 2nd, but until then here is a preview of Sporano + Mooney’s Proposal!

Follow us after the break for more…

Kimball Art Center / Brooks + Scarpa Architects

North View approach - Courtesy of

As we announced yesterday, Brooks + Scarpa Architects is one of the five finalists selected for the Kimball Art Center competition. Inspired by the “seemingly endless” blue skies and the unique blend of new and old within the historic , Brooks + Scarpa delicately weave the heavy mass of the existing 12,000 square foot Kimball Art Center with the new 22,000 square foot addition that has been referred to as the Kimball “Cloud”.

Kimball Art Center Shortlist

Proposal - Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

In 1976, art enthusiast Bill Kimball transformed the 1929 Kimball Bros automotive garage into a non-profit community center for the visual arts, now known as the Kimball Art Center. Located in the heart of downtown Park City, Utah, the non-profit center serves as a gathering place for individuals to experience art through education, exhibitions and events. The aging historic building is in need of restoration and an addition that will allow the organization to increase their educational outreach and enhance the quality and scale of the exhibitions, while maintaining free admission to the public.

BIG, Brooks + Scarpa, Sparano + Mooney Architecture, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien Architects, and Will Bruder + Partners LTD are the five architects selected to submit final proposals for the transformation of the .

Continue after the break to watch each firm’s introductory presentation.

Kimball Art Center / BIG

Courtesy of (BIG)

In approaching the design for the new , Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) found great inspiration in the urban development of Park City, the Kimball site, and the city’s mining heritage. They feel the form of the new Kimball Art Center emerges where these rich stories overlap. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Emigration Canyon Residence / Sparano + Mooney Architecture

© Dustin Aksland

Architect: Sparano + Mooney Architecture
Location: Salt Lake City, ()
Project Year: 2009
Project Area: 2,700SqFt
Contractor: Benchmark Modern
Photography: Dustin Aksland

   

Utah Valley University Noorda Theater / Axis Architects

© Paul Richer

Architect: Axis Architects
Location: , Utah
Project year: 2009
Project Area: 11,700SqFt New, 8,100SqFt Remodel
Project Cost: $2.5M
Client: Utah Valley University
Consultants: Bsumek Mu and Associates
Photography: Paul Richer, Richer Images