Graduating in 2013? You’re in Luck…

© Carlos Willis

 is a Vice President at and teaches at Yale (see our interview with him here). Last week, we published his “5 Pearls of Wisdoms for Architecture Grads,” originally written in 2011. This week, Phil is back to talk to Architecture students again, but this time with some updated advice for the grads of 2013.

It’s been a year since my “Winter Commencement” discussion, and just a few days since I gave my annual talk to our graduating students about the state of the construction economy and what that means for their spring job hunt.  And since ArchDaily decided to repost that blog recently, it seemed timely to reflect a bit on how things have changed since December of 2011, and what those changes might mean for job prospects going forward.

And what a difference a year makes, at least for this year’s graduating class.  The elections are over, most of the economic malaise, while not lifted here in the U.S, is certainly lighter, and designing, building and, most importantly, hiring seems to be on the rise again.  In fact, for the first time since 2009, I suggested to our students that prospects for their employment are the brightest of the young decade.

Here’s my reasoning…

Find out why Grads in 2013 are facing far rosier circumstances, after the break…

5 Pearls of Wisdom for Architecture Grads, by Phil Bernstein

Gund Hall (home of the Graduate School of Design) during Harvard Graduation. Year 2007. Photo CC Wikimedia User Tebici.

is a Vice President at and teaches at Yale (see our interview with him here). This post, originally published in 2011 on his blog as “Winter Commencement,” offers timeless advice for architecture students about to enter the job market. 

As December now rolls around it’s the eve of my last lecture in my professional practice class at Yale. Although I’ve been teaching for almost twenty-five years, I still can’t believe how quickly the semester accelerates into Thanksgiving, and suddenly it’s all over but the shouting (or, in our case, final projects and juries). About the same time as the term slammed to a closed I received a note from a student at Prarie View A&M, asking many of the existential questions that must be facing architecture students nearing their degrees. Seemed like a good time to speculate a bit about that future, and what this year’s graduates might be facing as they confront the job market in the spring, with enough time between now and then to contemplate their options and plot their strategies, so here goes:

Read on to find out Phil Bernstein’s 5 tips for future grads, after the break…

AD Interview: Phil Bernstein

During the past AIA Convention we sat down with John Bacus from Google Sketchup to discuss how this tool can help architects on their workflows, with a tool that is easy to use, fast and extensible.

We also had the chance to talk with Phil Bernstein, faculty at Yale and currently the Vice President of AEC Industry and Relations for Autodesk. Given his background and current position, I immediately scheduled an interview with him as I wanted an architect on the industry to tell us more on how is helping out architects in several ways.

Phil was very clear and precise on this, and the idea of this interview is to help our readers to make a decision on  adopting BIM solutions, and also to help architecture students to see how learning to use a BIM software can help them in their future job seek.

As an example on the importance of BIM, I asked early this morning on Twitter what our readers think on adopting BIM and if arch students feel like they need to learn this before graduating. Here are some answers:

  • eclosson @archdaily ; ive used REVIT 4 3yrs…valuable tool 4 small firms, wrkn on athletic complex in Romania w/ team of 6-8, only possible w/BIM
  • roddimo @archdaily BIM is inevitable and you better get on the wagon if u want the next job. Clients are now asking for it
  • cvandevere @archdaily  BIM is a process. There are a number of tools/programs that can assist in that process and it’s implementation. #bim #revit
  • ryansinger @archdaily I use it and like it. For simple projects line drawing works and you can use your hand instead of CAD
  • berntstenberg @archdaily Re: BIM–not yet. Perhaps it’ll be standard someday, but I think only for big projects. We do res. remodels–still draw faste …
  • archop @archdaily @ my firm economy put halt on moving to BIM, but it is inevitable. Also the community College I teach at will begin offering i
  • DanielCon @archdaily I have never worked on a project where BIM made the process easier or smoother.  I’m sure everyone will have to learn it but why?
  • Numaru @archdaily I’m an architecture student in Korea. Even thought my class mates don’t know BIM well, we feel pressure of BIM.
  • Winter_Street @archdaily we bite the bullet – here’s our recent blog post on the investment and rewards [of BIM] http://bit.ly/13u9NA