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Richard Ivey Building / Hariri Pontarini Architects

11:00 - 21 August, 2015
Richard Ivey Building / Hariri Pontarini Architects, © Nikolas Koenig
© Nikolas Koenig

© Nikolas Koenig © James Brittain © Tom Arban © Nikolas Koenig +27

Open Call: Royal Exchange Design Competition for 2015 Graduates

06:00 - 21 August, 2015
Open Call: Royal Exchange Design Competition for 2015 Graduates , © The Royal Exchange
© The Royal Exchange

London-based architects Aukett Swanke, in partnership with the Royal Exchange and Oxford Properties, has announced its new competition for recent graduates to design six new market barrows located at The Royal Exchange in London. The deadline is September 11, so act fast!

Arup Design a 'Sky Pool' Suspended 35 Metres Above London's Nine Elms

04:00 - 21 August, 2015
Arup Design a 'Sky Pool' Suspended 35 Metres Above London's Nine Elms, The 'Sky Pool' will be suspended 35 metres above ground level. Image © Hayes Davidson
The 'Sky Pool' will be suspended 35 metres above ground level. Image © Hayes Davidson

A twenty five metre long, ten storey high suspended swimming pool—dubbed the 'Sky Pool'—has been planned for the second phase of a new high-end residential development in the London district of Nine Elms, next to the new Embassy of the United States. The pool is part of two buildings, designed by London-based practice HAL and part of a complex of 2000 homes developed Ireland's Ballymore Group. The water will be held in suspension by just twenty centimetres of "structure free" transparent glass, and will connect two housing blocks together. Alongside a rooftop bar, orangery and spa, a second connection between the two is also planned in the form of a footbridge.

Exhibition: Drawn to the Future

07:00 - 19 August, 2015
Exhibition: Drawn to the Future, Riding a virtual reality rollercoaster through a skyscraper city. c Agnese Sanvito
Riding a virtual reality rollercoaster through a skyscraper city. c Agnese Sanvito

Head-spinning funfair rides are part of the attraction of Drawn To The Future, an exhibition of new approaches to architectural visualisations at The Building Centre in London.

“We explore how digital media is changing the way we create built forms,” says the show curator, Lewis Blackwell, executive director of strategy at The Building Centre.

The most popular exhibit looks likely to be the virtual rollercoaster developed at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at the Bartlett School of Architecture. Viewed on an Oculus Rift headset, it simulates a rollercoaster journey around the skyscrapers of a fantasy city.

Event: Celebrating Segal in Walters Way, South London

10:30 - 17 August, 2015
Event: Celebrating Segal in Walters Way, South London, Houses built using the Segal System. Image © Chris Moxley.
Houses built using the Segal System. Image © Chris Moxley.

Residents of a unique south London housing scheme are hosting a free event to celebrate the work of the architect who designed their street. Walter Segal, who died 30 years ago, will be remembered at a special Celebrating Segal day on Saturday 19th September 2015, 11am-3pm.

The day of talks, films, art and tours will take place in Walters Way, South London, which was designed by Segal, built by residents, and is one of two streets named after him (the other being Segal close). The event, which is part of Open House London, will highlight Segal’s achievements and his

SimpsonHaugh and Partners Begins Construction on Dollar Bay Residential Tower in London

08:00 - 17 August, 2015
SimpsonHaugh and Partners Begins Construction on Dollar Bay Residential Tower in London, Courtesy of SimpsonHaugh and Partners
Courtesy of SimpsonHaugh and Partners

SimpsonHaugh and Partners has announced the construction of its new premier residential tower, called Dollar Bay, at the East India Dock overlooking Canary Wharf in London.

Named for the site’s World War Two heritage—“when dockworkers would tow American naval ships to their moorings for the cost of one dollar”—the building will provide unparalleled views of the River Thames from where it sits across from the O2 Arena.

Courtesy of SimpsonHaugh and Partners Courtesy of SimpsonHaugh and Partners Courtesy of SimpsonHaugh and Partners Courtesy of SimpsonHaugh and Partners +12

London E8 / Scenario Architecture

05:00 - 17 August, 2015
London E8 / Scenario Architecture, © Matt Clayton
© Matt Clayton

© Matt Clayton © Matt Clayton © Matt Clayton © Matt Clayton +17

How Walter Segal's 1970s DIY Community Could Help Solve Today's Housing Crisis

09:30 - 14 August, 2015

In recent years, DIY approaches to building houses have become increasingly popular, as increasing cost and decreasing availability have caused some prospective house-buyers to embrace simple methods of fabrication and the sweat of their own brow, as discussed in this recent article. However, this trend has much earlier precedents: in 1979, self-build pioneer Walter Segal had already embraced these progressive concepts in a development known as "Walter's Way," an enclave of self-built social housing in southeast London. According to Dave Dayes, a Walter's Way resident and an original builder on the project, Segal believed that "anybody can build a house. All you need to do is cut a straight line and drill a straight hole." The houses were built entirely of standard wood units assembled onsite in Lewisham.

In this video, London based non-profit The Architecture Foundation steps into the utopia of Walter's Way, a micro-neighborhood founded on principals of communal living for people of all backgrounds. The film has been released in connection with Doughnut: The Outer London Festival taking place September 5th, which will bring together writers, historians, architects and economists for "an adventurous celebration of all things Outer London and a critical reflection on the rapid transformation that the city's periphery is currently experiencing." The Architecture Foundation aims to introduce central Londoners (and the world) to the radically functional housing concepts in practice at Walter's way.

Winkley Workshop / Kirkwood McCarthy

11:00 - 12 August, 2015
Winkley Workshop / Kirkwood McCarthy, © David Butler
© David Butler

© David Butler © Tim Crocker © David Butler © David Butler +15

99% Invisible Explores Brutalism, From London to Boston

04:00 - 12 August, 2015

In the latest episode of 99% Invisible, Hard to Love a Brute, Roman Mars and Avery Trufelman take a look at the potted history of the "hulking concrete brutes" of post-war Europe, centring on the UK, and the US east coast. Exploring Ernö Goldfinger's Balfron and Trellick towers, while making a pitstop in Boston, MA, this twenty minute podcast examines why people "love to hate" Brutalism and why, "as harsh as it looks, concrete is an utterly optimistic building material."

Justin McGuirk Appointed as Chief Curator of London's Design Museum

14:22 - 10 August, 2015
Justin McGuirk Appointed as Chief Curator of London's Design Museum, via disegnodaily.com
via disegnodaily.com

British writer and curator Justin McGuirk has joined London's Design Museum as their new chief curator. The former editor of Icon, design critic of The Guardian and director of Strelka Press was also named head of Design Curating & Writing at Design Academy Eindhoven earlier this year. As you may remember, McGuirk was awarded the Golden Lion at the 2012 Venice Biennale for an exhibition he curated with Urban Think Tank. He is also the author of Radical Cities: Across Latin America in Search of a New Architecture

McGuirk will be responsible for coordinating the museum's new program after its relocation to Kensington in 2016. 

Robin Hood Gardens, Once Again, Looks Set to be Demolished

04:00 - 10 August, 2015
Robin Hood Gardens, Once Again, Looks Set to be Demolished, © Luke Hayes
© Luke Hayes

The announcement in 2012 that London's Robin Hood Gardens — Alison and Peter Smithson's world-famous Brutalist housing estate — was set to be demolished was, on the whole, met with outrage among the architectural community. Since that time, many called for the profession to act in order to protect "one of Britain’s most important post-war housing projects," which led to a fresh bid to save the scheme in March of this year. Richard Rogers, Simon Smithson (a partner at RSHP and son of Alison and Peter Smithson), and academic Dirk van den Heuvel recently called upon members of the public to voice their concerns to the UK Ministry for Culture, Media and Sport.

In spite of this, it has now been announced that the UK Heritage Minister, Tracey Crouch, "is minded to approve the Certificate of Immunity for Robin Hood Gardens" meaning that the decision not to list the residential complex in Tower Hamlets will be upheld, giving a "legal guarantee that the building or buildings named in the certificate will not be considered for listing for five years."  This will be the second certificate of this type to have been issued for this complex. According to Historic England, "a period of 28 days [beginning on the 4th August 2015] is now allowed for review before the certificate is issued."

Great British Buildings: Pear Tree House, London

19:30 - 7 August, 2015
Great British Buildings: Pear Tree House, London, Pear Tree House, Photographer: Nick Worley
Pear Tree House, Photographer: Nick Worley

An exclusive architect-led, behind the scenes talk and tour of this RIBA London Award winning family home by Edgley Design. Discover the stories behind the building, what inspired the architect and what it means to have won this prize.

10 New Burlington Street / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

19:00 - 7 August, 2015
10 New Burlington Street / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, © Rob Parrish
© Rob Parrish

© Rob Parrish © Timothy Soar © Rob Parrish © Timothy Soar +20

Monocle 24 Explore Architectural Competitions and 'Failed Bids'

04:00 - 7 August, 2015

For this week's edition of The Urbanist, Monocle's weekly "guide to making better cities," the team discuss urbanism projects that were planned and never realised, what 'paper architecture' really is, and the importance of the architectural competition.

In The Urbanist, Andrew Tuck explores how a terrace of old town houses in central London (152-158 The Strand, near Somerset House) have been recently saved from demolition by the efforts of campaigning journalists and a sympathetic public. In Brazil, the yet to be seen high-speed train link between Rio di Janeiro and São Paulo meets scrutiny while in Toronto, five unsuccessful architectural bids are examined. Finally, ArchDaily Editor James Taylor-Foster visits their London studio to talk about the architectural competition, from Brunelleschi to Guggenheim and Den Bosch.

Burntwood School / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

02:00 - 7 August, 2015
Burntwood School / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, © Rob Parrish
© Rob Parrish

© Timothy Soar © Timothy Soar © Timothy Soar © Timothy Soar +32

Heatherwick Wins Planning for New Maggie’s Centre in Leeds

14:35 - 3 August, 2015
Heatherwick Wins Planning for New Maggie’s Centre in Leeds, © Heatherwick Studio
© Heatherwick Studio

Heatherwick Studio has received planning permission to build a new Maggie's center on the St James' University Hospital grounds in Leeds. Aiming to harness the therapeutic effect of plants for the benefit of the center's cancer patients, the building was designed as a series of stepped "planters" that intertwine to form a unique and restorative layout of inside, outside, private and public space. 

"The site is a small patch of green surrounded by the huge volumes of the existing hospital buildings. Instead of taking away the open space we wanted to make a whole building out of a garden," said Thomas Heatherwick in a press release. 

London's Brutalist British Library Given 'Listed' Status

04:15 - 3 August, 2015
London's Brutalist British Library Given 'Listed' Status, Courtesy of The British Library
Courtesy of The British Library

The British Library in London's St. Pancras is often hailed as the only major public building to be built in Great Britain in the twentieth century. "No other project, since the building of St. Paul’s Cathedral over 400 years ago, took so long to construct or was surrounded by so much controversy." Begun in 1962, completed in 1997, and opened to the public in 1998, the Brutalist building is a world-class a repository of artistic, scholarly and literary treasures. It has now, along with seven other post-war libraries, been given Grade I Listed status for "its soaring and stimulating spaces" which, according to Historic England, have become "much-loved and well-used by scholars and members of the public alike."