TU/e Students to Build Leonardo da Vinci’s Bridge Out of Ice

Courtesy of

Students from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) will attempt to beat the world-record for the longest open span attained by an ice structure by constructing an ice bridge inspired by Leonardo da Vinci. Following a yearly tradition of exhibiting architecture made from ice, the bridge is anticipated to span an astounding 50 meters. If the team succeeds, they will shatter the school’s previous record set in 2014 when students built an ice dome spanning 30 meters.

Read on after the break for more on the massive ice bridge.

6 Final Designs Unveiled for Guggenheim Helsinki

All 6 finalists. Image Courtesy of Guggenheim

Now for the first time, Guggenheim has unveiled the six fully developed designs competing to become Guggenheim Helsinki. Selected from 1,715 entries in world’s the most popular architectural competition, the remaining finalists have spent the past five months refining their designs after being shortlisted by an independent 11-member jury, of which includes Studio Gang’s Jeanne Gang and former Columbia University dean Mark Wigley.

The release foreshadows the April 25 opening of Guggenheim Helsinki Now: Six Finalist Designs Unveiled, a free exhibition that will open the projects up to public critique. A winner will be announced on June 23.

All 6 detailed proposals, after the break.

Competition Results: ‘The Next Helsinki’ Call For Ideas

#76 MUUSA / draftworks*architects. Image Courtesy of The Next

The organisers behind The Next Helsinki, an ‘anti-competition’ masterminded by architect and critic Michael Sorkin, have highlighted a number of entries from 217 international submissions. Launched as an alternative to the controversial, “imperialised” Guggenheim Helsinki project, the call for ideas asked architects, urbanists, artists, and environmentalists to imagine how  and its South Harbour could be transformed for the maximum benefit of the city’s residents and visitors. It “sought to ask first if a massive foreign museum was the highest and best use for public resources, especially in an aspiration-focused egalitarian social democracy like Finland.”

See a shortlist of eight entries that, according to the jury, “reflect the variety and depth of the submissions” after the break. “These entries are not to be viewed as refined and final proposals, but rather ideas.”

10 Things The “Cities: Skylines” Video Game Taught Us About Modern Urbanism

Courtesy of D. Wheatley (in-game screenshot)

Ask a random person in the street about their favorite hobbies, and it’s unlikely that they’ll say “urban planning and traffic management” – yet when video games began to take off in the late 1980s city-building was one of the first breakout hits, in the form of Maxis’ SimCity series. The huge success of the “Sim” series in general drove conversations about the value of , as part of the general 1990s optimism about virtual worlds being the future. Sim games became the subject of academic critiques of their philosophy of the world, while city builders became a lot more than a game: in 2002, SimCity 3000 was used as a semi-serious test for mayoral candidates in Warsaw.

After a slump caused by a difficult transition to 3D graphics, city builders are back in vogue. Following what is widely considered as a disappointing SimCity reboot in 2013, ’s Colossal Order recently released Cities: Skylines to critical and financial success. But simulations require assumptions; they are, after all, written by people who have their own conscious and unconscious views on how and why cities work. The limitations around designing a video game – the fact that each asset must be modeled and textured, and that each transport option requires a huge amount of work to simulate – mean that Cities: Skylines is as stripped down and streamlined an articulation of urban philosophy as Le Corbusier’s Ville Radieuse or the New Urbanists’ models, and just as interesting. We investigate 10 things this game tells us about 21st century urbanism, after the break.

Michael Sorkin’s ‘The Next Helsinki’ Competition Attracts Over 200 Entries

The organisers behind The Next Helsinki, a competition masterminded by architect and critic Michael Sorkin, have announced that they have received over 200 international entries. Launched as an alternative to the controversial Guggenheim Helsinki project, the competition called upon architects, urbanists, artists, and environmentalists to imagine how and the South Harbour site allotted to the proposed museum could be transformed for the maximum benefit of the city’s residents and visitors.

Puukuokka Housing Block / OOPEAA

© Mikko Auerniitty

Architects: OOPEAA
Location: 40100 Jyväskylä,
Architect In Charge: Anssi Lassila
Project Architects: Juha Pakkala (construction stage), Iida Hedberg (design process stage)
Other Team Members: Jussi-Pekka Vesala (master plan stage) Mia Salonen, Teemu Hirvilammi, Hanna-Kaarina Heikkilä, Santtu Hyvärinen
Area: 18650.0 sqm
Year: 2015
Photographs: Mikko Auerniitty

Kalasataman Huvilat Townhouses / PORTAALI architects Ltd + ArkOpen Ltd

© Photos Tuomas Uusheimo

Architects: PORTAALI architects Ltd,
Location: Antareksenkatu 10, 00540 , Finland
Architect In Charge: Juha Kämäräinen
Area: 1955.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Photos Tuomas Uusheimo, Studio Halas

Dream Hotel / Studio Puisto Architects

© Marc Goodwin

Architects: Studio Puisto Architects
Location: 33870 ,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Marc Goodwin, Patrik Rastenberger

Kotisaarenkatu Housing / Playa Arkkitehdit

© Tuomas Uusheimo

Architects: Playa Arkkitehdit
Location: Kotisaarenkatu 7, 00550 , Finland
Architect In Charge: Veikko Ojanlatva, Tuukka Vuori, Sirpa Pyyhtiä
Design Team: Marja Lapinleimu, Tuomas Raikamo, Jukka Kangasniemi, Mari Haavisto, Ulla Seppä, Jukka Sulonen
Scale Model: Daniel Lütolf
Area: 5190.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Tuomas Uusheimo, Courtesy of Playa Architects, Tarja Nurmi, LUMART

Cafe Birgitta / Talli Architecture and Design

© Tuomas Uusiheimo

Architects: Talli Architecture and Design
Location: Hernesaarenranta, 00150 , Finland
Architects In Charge: Minna Lukander, Jari Heikkinen
Area: 158.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Tuomas Uusiheimo

Spotlight: Alvar Aalto

University. Image © Nico Saieh

As one of the key figures of midcentury modernism and perhaps Finland‘s most celebrated architect, Alvar Aalto (3 February 1898 – 11 May 1976) was known for his humanistic approach to modernism. Aalto was concerned about creating a total work of art. He did not simply design buildings but also paid close attention to their interior features, including furniture, lamps, and glassware design.

Three Lessons From Finnish Architecture

Kuokkala Church – . Image © Fernanda Castro

I recently had the opportunity to visit , representing ArchDaily on an architecture press tour organized by the Museum of Finnish Architecture. This was a chance for me to see firsthand some of the recent architecture projects built in the last several years by young architects.

I would like to share with you some of the lessons and best practices I learned from Finnish architecture that I believe we could apply to our work as architects (especially in Latin America, where I am from).

Gösta Serlachius Museum / MX_SI

© Pedro Pegenaute

Architects: MX_SI
Location: Gösta Serlachiuksen taidemuseo, 35800 ,
Architects In Charge: Boris Bežan, Héctor Mendoza, Mara Partida
Area: 3500.0 sqm
Photographs: Pedro Pegenaute, Tuomas Uusheimo

Students Head To Finland To Construct Gaudí’s Sagrada Familia From Ice

Reimagining the Sagrada Familia in ice. Image © Bart van Overbeeke / TU/e

A team of  from Eindhoven University are set to build a forty metre high model of Antoni Gaudí’s Sagrada Familia out of ‘ice’. The project, which follows their completion of the world’s biggest ice dome last year, will be constructed from pykrete and reinforced with wood fibres. The fifty-strong team will head to on the 28th December 2014 to begin construction of the impressive 1:5 scale model, which will be built in only four weeks in order to officially open in the last week of January 2015.

Read about their unique construction method and see photos of the preparatory work after the break.

32 “Discarded” Helsinki Guggenheim Proposals You Should Know About

The search for a design for Helsinki’s new Guggenheim Museum is well under way. Over a thousand entrants submitted anonymous proposals for the harbor-side museum, and though six finalists have now been chosen, the incredible wealth of talent and effort present in the submissions is hard to ignore. We celebrate that talent here, showcasing 32 great designs-that-could-have-been for the . Learn more about all of them, after the break!

Villa Musu / Sanaksenaho Architects

© Jussi Tiainen

Architects: Sanaksenaho Architects
Location:
Area: 360.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Jussi Tiainen

AD Interviews: Juulia Kauste / Museum of Finnish Architecture (MFA)

On her recent trip to Chile for the Finland-Chile Architecture Marathon lecture series we had the chance to chat with Juulie Kauste, the director of the Museum of Finnish Architecture (MFA) in Helsinki. “[MFA] has always had the dual mission of focusing on collecting the heritage of architecture in Finland as well as focusing on contemporary architecture both in Finland and internationally,” Kauste explained.

One of the oldest architecture-focused museums in the world, MFA is unusual in that not only do they archive the work of every Finnish architect, but they also play an active role in promoting Finnish architecture and participating in the global architectural community. At both the Shenzhen Biennale and the 2014 Venice Biennale, MFA hosted “Re-Creation,” an installation that used both traditional Finnish and Chinese construction techniques to explore the concepts of “copying” and “reinterpretation.”

“The key part of the role of the museum is to provide a platform for a discussion and debate around architecture and around the ways in which architecture matters to society,” Kauste said. “It’s very much about this idea of sharing information about architecture, making information about architecture available, but also understandable.”

See what else Kauste has to say about what the role of architecture museums should be, how the digital age is affecting museums and the benefits of cross- collaboration in the full video interview above and check out some of our past coverage on MFA below.

6 Finalists Revealed in Guggenheim Helsinki Competition

Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants

The Guggenheim has announced the finalists in the competition to design Guggenheim Helsinki, whittling down the entrants from a record-breaking 1,715 submissions to just six. Representing both emerging and established practices with offices in seven countries, the shortlisted entries show a variety of responses to the challenge of creating a world-class museum.

The six finalists are:

Read on after the break to see all six designs in detail, as well as the jury’s comments on each.