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Collective-LOK Wins Van Alen Institute's Ground/Work Competition

Last May, the Van Alen Institute of New York called on emerging architects to design an engaging and accessible street-level venue for the Institute to house its entire work space and public programs. This past July the competition finalists were revealed and now Collective–LOK has been announced as the winner of Ground/Work: A Design Competition for Van Alen Institute’s New Street-Level Space.

Read on to learn about their winning design...

Studio Dwelling / cmA Arquitectos

  • Architects: cmA Arquitectos
  • Location: Boadilla del Monte, Madrid, Spain
  • Project Architects: Jorge Javier Camacho Diez, María Eugenia Maciá Torregrosa
  • Collaborators: Christine Müller-Hildebrand, Juan Santana Baéz, David Gómez Gómez, Manuel Díaz
  • Project Area: 450.0 m2
  • Photography: Courtesy of cmA Arquitectos

Courtesy of cmA Arquitectos Courtesy of cmA Arquitectos Courtesy of cmA Arquitectos Courtesy of cmA Arquitectos

The Warehaus / Residential Attitudes

Courtesy of Residential Attitudes
Courtesy of Residential Attitudes
  • Architects: Residential Attitudes
  • Location: 12 Grimwood Avenue, Gwelup WA 6018, Australia
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Residential Attitudes

Courtesy of Residential Attitudes Courtesy of Residential Attitudes Courtesy of Residential Attitudes Courtesy of Residential Attitudes

AD Classics: The Museum of Modern Art

The entrance to the Museum of Modern Art is tucked beneath a demure facade of granite and glass in Midtown Manhattan. Its clean, regular planes mark Yoshio Taniguchi's 2004 addition to the MoMA's sequence of facades, which he preserved as a record of its form. Taniguchi's contribution sits beside the 1984 residential tower by Cesar Pelli and Associates, followed by Philip Goodwin and Edward Durell Stone’s original 1939 building, then Philip Johnson’s 1964 addition. Taniguchi was hired in 1997 to expand the Museum’s space and synthesize its disparate elements. His elegant, minimal solution presents a contemporary face for the MoMA while adhering to its Modernist roots.

53rd Street entrance. Image © Timothy Hursley The Atrium. Image © Timothy Hursley View of the gallery complex from 54th Street. Image © Timothy Hursley Sequence of facades on 53rd Street. Image © Timothy Hursley

Baan Suan Mook / SOOK Architects

  • Architects: SOOK Architects
  • Location: Hua Hin, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Thailand
  • Design Team: Rujnumporn Keskasemsook, Nuttachat Kosintranont, Aumpika Amloy
  • Area: 1770.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Spaceshift Studio

© Spaceshift Studio © Spaceshift Studio © Spaceshift Studio © Spaceshift Studio

Bitten House / arnau estudi d'arquitectura

  • Architects: arnau estudi d'arquitectura
  • Location: Sant Feliu de Pallerols, Spain
  • Architect in Charge: Arnau Vergés Tejero
  • Collaborator: Xevi Bayona Camó
  • Construction Engineer: Josep ma Codinach Frigola
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Marc Torra

© Marc Torra © Marc Torra © Marc Torra © Marc Torra

Faculty of Economics Ghent University / Xaveer De Geyter Architects + Stéphane Beel Architects

  • Architects: Xaveer De Geyter Architects, Stéphane Beel Architects
  • Location: Ghent, Belgium
  • Architects in Charge: Xaveer De Geyter, Stéphane Beel, Jo Taillieu, Isabelle Blancke, Inge Buyse – Dan Budik, Piet Crevits, Tobias Labarque, Michael Smith, Lieve Van De Ginste, David Van Severen
  • Structural Engineer: SWK Arcadis
  • Mechanical Engineer: Ingenium
  • Landscape: Michel Desvigne Paysagiste
  • Acoustics: Daidalos
  • Durability: Cenergie
  • Area: 7241.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2006
  • Photographs: Frans Parthesius

© Frans Parthesius © Frans Parthesius © Frans Parthesius © Frans Parthesius

Invisible Skyscraper Unveiled for Seoul

California-based GDS Architects' new proposal, dubbed Infinity Tower, is designed to disappear from its Korean skyline. How? Cameras will be mounted at six strategic points; thousands of LED screens on the facade will then broadcast the real-time photos captured and logged by the cameras. Though no estimated completion date has been announced, the developers have received construction permits to break ground. More about this incredible vanishing act and how it's done at Fast Co-Design

Montpelier Community Nursery / AY Architects

© Daniel Stier
© Daniel Stier
  • Architects: AY Architects
  • Location: Kentish Town, London Borough of Camden, London NW5, UK
  • Area: 136.0 sqm
  • Photographs: Daniel Stier, Nick Kane

© Nick Kane © Nick Kane © Nick Kane © Nick Kane

Vroenhoven Bridge / Ney&Partners

  • Architects: Ney&Partners
  • Location: Riemst, Belgium
  • Area: 195.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Ney&Partners

Courtesy of Ney&Partners Courtesy of Ney&Partners Courtesy of Ney&Partners Courtesy of Ney&Partners

Mark Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia University's GSAPP

Mark Wigley announced Monday that he will be stepping down as dean of Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) at the end of the academic year in 2014. 

Could Virtual Cities Make Our Real Cities Smarter?

This article, by Klaus Philipsen, FAIA originally appeared on his blog Community Architect

As BIM (Building Information Modeling) slowly finds broader acceptance in the architecture and engineering of individual buildings, perhaps it is time to consider the next scale: the city. Just like virtual models help us design and understand buildings and embed information, virtual city simulations could have an application in real city planning, allowing us to go from “flat” GIS to three dimensional information modeling that includes terrain, infrastructure, buildings and public spaces. Could virtual cities be the answer to "smart cities"? Find out after the break.

Siblings Factory / JDS Architects

© Nico Neefs © Nico Neefs © Nico Neefs © Nico Neefs

Eisenman's Evolution: Architecture, Syntax, and New Subjectivity

Iman Ansari with Peter Eisenman in his office, New York 2013. Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com
Iman Ansari with Peter Eisenman in his office, New York 2013. Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com

In this article, which originally appeared on Architectural ReviewIman Ansari interviews Peter Eisenman about his personal views on architecture throughout the course of his career. 

Iman Ansari: More than any other contemporary architect, you have sought a space for architecture outside the traditional and conventional realm. You have continually argued that modern architecture was never fully modern and it failed to produce a cognitive reflection about the nature of architecture in a fundamental way.  From your early houses, we see a search for a system of architectural meaning and an attempt to establish a linguistic model for architecture: The idea that buildings are not simply physical objects, but artifacts with meaning, or signs dispersed across some larger social text. But these houses were also part of a larger project that was about the nature of drawing and representation in architecture. You described them as “cardboard architecture” which neglects the architectural material, scale, function, site, and all semantics associations in favor of architecture as “syntax”: conception of form as an index, a signal or a notation. So to me, it seems like between the object and the idea of the object, your approach favors the latter. The physical house is merely a medium through which the conception of the virtual or conceptual house becomes possible. In that sense, the real building exists only in your drawings.

Peter Eisenman: The “real architecture” only exists in the drawings. The “real building” exists outside the drawings. The difference here is that “architecture” and “building” are not the same.

An axonometric drawing of Eisenman’s House II, (1975). Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com Eisenman's unrealized Qaui Branly Museum in Paris. Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com Model of Cannaregio project with House 11a at different scales (1978). Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com The cover of Michael Haneke's "Funny Games" (2007) with a caption from Eisenman. Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com

Haus Crussow / ANNABAU

  • Architects: ANNABAU
  • Location: Brandenburg, Germany
  • Architect in Charge: Moritz Schloten
  • Area: 200.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Hanns Joosten

© Hanns Joosten © Hanns Joosten © Hanns Joosten © Hanns Joosten

Kasel / Architekten Stein Hemmes Wirtz

  • Architects: Architekten Stein Hemmes Wirtz
  • Location: Kasel, Germany
  • Structure Engineers: Büro Ralf Bertges
  • HVAC Engineers: Anlagenbau Brisch, Büro Invertec
  • Area: 339.3 sqm
  • Project Year: 2009
  • Photographs: Linda Blatzek

© Linda Blatzek © Linda Blatzek © Linda Blatzek © Linda Blatzek