MoyaMoya / Fumihiko Sano

01:00 - 9 June, 2014
MoyaMoya / Fumihiko Sano, © Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc
© Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc

© Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc © Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc © Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc © Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc +39

Unit T2 for Goodman / MAKE Creative

01:00 - 9 June, 2014
Unit T2 for Goodman / MAKE Creative, © Luc Remond
© Luc Remond

© Luc Remond © Luc Remond © Luc Remond © Luc Remond +11

Charles Moore: Going Against the Grain

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
Charles Moore: Going Against the Grain, A portrait of Moore, who was always more interested in how people moved through spaces­—and the resulting fragmentary views—­than a single beauty shot. Image Courtesy of Charles Moore Foundation
A portrait of Moore, who was always more interested in how people moved through spaces­—and the resulting fragmentary views—­than a single beauty shot. Image Courtesy of Charles Moore Foundation

“Who threw this tantrum?” This question sums up how Charles Moore’s peers reacted when they saw his Lovejoy Fountain project for the first time. Moore was always a bit unconventional by contemporary standards – he designed what others would not dare, creating a body of work that alludes to everything from Italian baroque forms to Mexican folk art colors to Japanese wood construction. Originally published as Why Charles Moore (Still) Matters on Metropolis Magazine, check out Alexandra Lange’s thoughtful piece on the influential architect after the break.

“Stop work. It looks like a prison.” That was the telegram from the developers in response to Moore Lyndon Turnbull Whitaker’s (MLTW) first design for the Sea Ranch, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. Architects Charles Moore, Donlyn Lyndon, William Turnbull, and Richard Whitaker, working with landscape architect Lawrence Halprin, had used sugar cubes to model the 24-foot module for each of the condominium’s original ten units. And that boxy choice, combined with the simplest of windows and vertical redwood siding, produced something more penitentiary than vacation (it’s sited on a choice stretch of Sonoma coast). 

Moore's wacky bedframe in his New Haven home, complete with trompe l’oeil dome overhead. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine Designed in 1978, the Piazza d’Italia was built to honor the Italian American community in New Orleans. It was done in collaboration with Arthur Andersson, Steven Bingler, Allen Eskew, Ronald Filson and Malcolm Heard. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine Barbara Stauffacher Solomon painted highly influential supergraphics inside the Swim Club, further altering perceptions of its small scale. In subsequent projects, Moore often worked with Tina Beebe to select interior color arrangements. Image Courtesy of Jim Alinder / Princeton Architectural Press Moore in the backyard of his New Haven home, late 1960s. He took a traditional clapboard house and poked holes through it, including this glassy rear extension. Image Courtesy of Charles Moore Foundation +10

New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?, BIG's 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
BIG's 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

For small firms, design competitions can often feel like a Catch22 - enter and lose precious time and resources (usually for nothing) or avoid them - at the risk of losing out on the "big break." Now a new class at Harvard's Graduate School of Design takes on just this quandary, as well as the many other practical, theoretical, and moral implications of architectural competitions for the profession. Learn more at this article at the Harvard Gazette.

LLAMA / KILO + BIG

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
LLAMA /  KILO  + BIG, Courtesy of BIG
Courtesy of BIG
  • Architects

  • Location

    Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Architects in Charge

    Lars Larsen (KILO), Jakob Lange (BIG)
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of BIG

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG +15

5 Awesome AutoCAD Tricks

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
5 Awesome AutoCAD Tricks, Courtesy of CADline
Courtesy of CADline

Do you get excited when you discover a game-changing command on AutoCAD? Don't worry, us too - which is why we're recommending five AutoCAD YouTube tutorials selected by Line//Shape//Space. To learn something new (like importing point cloud data or searching for text within your drawings), or just to brush up on your skills, click here.

School in Vilaflor / TECHNE

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
School in Vilaflor  / TECHNE, Courtesy of TECHNE
Courtesy of TECHNE
  • Architects

  • Location

    38613 Vilaflor, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
  • Architect in Charge

    José Manuel Rodríguez Peña
  • Engineer

    Nelson Hernández Dorta
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photography

    Courtesy of TECHNE

Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE +24

Unified Architectural Theory: Chapter 5

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
Unified Architectural Theory: Chapter 5, Dessau Bauhaus / Walter Gropius. "We read with alarm about Bauhaus images and practices introduced into the architectural education of developing countries. The press announces these as “progressive” moves, little realizing what danger that poses to that country’s tradition". Image © Thomas Lewandovski
Dessau Bauhaus / Walter Gropius. "We read with alarm about Bauhaus images and practices introduced into the architectural education of developing countries. The press announces these as “progressive” moves, little realizing what danger that poses to that country’s tradition". Image © Thomas Lewandovski

We will be publishing Nikos Salingaros’ book, Unified Architectural Theory, in a series of installments, making it digitally, freely available for students and architects around the world. The following chapter discusses our society’s phobia against natural, local forms - our “ecophobia” - and the need for the architecture discipline to counter this fear by adopting a more scientifically-rigorous, intellectual structure. If you missed them, make sure to read the previous installments here.

The 21st century has begun with a continuation, and perhaps intensification, of the worst prejudices seen in the twentieth. Those prejudices include a disdain of traditional cultures, and all that links a human being to his/her local history. 

Similarly, most building and planning today follow unwritten rules that have no empirical foundation, being based strictly upon visual/ideological constructs from the early twentieth century. Contemporary design avoids any criterion of quality that draws upon evolved precedent and tradition from a prior era, and thinks that this refusal is a great virtue. In this way, architects and urbanists end up obeying simplistic criteria for design, rejecting any sense of beauty that links human beings with their land, tradition, and culture. 

The term “ecophobia” refers to an unreasonable but deeply conditioned reaction against natural forms. It has also been used in clinical psychology to denote a phobia against one’s dwelling, but that specific use now appears to be antiquated. However, we believe that these two terms “ecophobia” and “oikophobia” may in many cases be used interchangeably. (Linguistically, the common Greek root for “house” can be written either as ecos or oikos). 

Terminal da Lapa / Núcleo de Arquitetura

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
© Nelson Kon
© Nelson Kon
  • Architects

  • Location

    Rua Guaicurus - Água Branca, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Architect in Charge

    Luciano Margotto, Marcelo Ursini, Sérgio Salles
  • Area

    7015.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2003
  • Photographs

© Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon +24

Le Clos Y / Dai Sugasawa

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
Le Clos Y / Dai Sugasawa, © Antoine DUHAMEL
© Antoine DUHAMEL
  • Interior Designers

  • Location

    27 Avenue du Maine, 75015 Paris, France
  • Project Chief

    Simon Gasquet
  • Architects Chief

    Pierre Millet
  • General Construction

    Adriano de Sousa (CREADS)
  • Area

    100.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Antoine DUHAMEL © Antoine DUHAMEL © Antoine DUHAMEL © Antoine DUHAMEL +15

Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
© Al Ravenna
© Al Ravenna

In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.

S.C. Johnson and Son Administration Building. Image © Jeff Dean Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Taliesin West. Image © lumierefl via Flickr Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Image © Richard Anderson via Flickr +25

Renewal ‘Stedelijk Museum Hof van Busleyden’ / dmvA architecten + Hlc.r architect

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
Renewal ‘Stedelijk Museum Hof van Busleyden’  / dmvA architecten  +  Hlc.r architect, © Frederik Vercruysse
© Frederik Vercruysse

© Frederik Vercruysse © Frederik Vercruysse © Frederik Vercruysse © Frederik Vercruysse +10

Bamboo: A Viable Alternative to Steel Reinforcement?

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
Bamboo: A Viable Alternative to Steel Reinforcement?, bamboo reinforcement. Image © Professorship of Architecture and Con- struction Dirk E. Hebel, ETH 3) Zürich / FCL Singapore
bamboo reinforcement. Image © Professorship of Architecture and Con- struction Dirk E. Hebel, ETH 3) Zürich / FCL Singapore

Developing countries have the highest demand for steel-reinforced concrete, but often do not have the means to produce the steel to meet that demand.  Rather than put themselves at the mercy of a global market dominated by developed countries, Singapore’s Future Cities Laboratory suggests an alternative to this manufactured rarity: bamboo.  Abundant, sustainable, and extremely resilient, bamboo has potential in the future to become an ideal replacement in places where steel cannot easily be produced.

Timescanners: Digital Scanners Explain Historic Architecture's Engineering Mysteries

00:00 - 7 June, 2014

Thanks to state of the art mobile laser scanners, scientists can now document the greatest architecture in history, from The Pyramids to St. Paul's Cathedral, as digital models with pinpoint accuracy. The digital representations take you inside, around and through the buildings, which means researchers can study and analyze sites without being in the field. The technology is already proving its worth - watch the trailer above to see how Petra was constructed and more!

KHT House / I.R.A.

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
KHT House / I.R.A., © Nobuaki Nakagawa
© Nobuaki Nakagawa
  • Architects

  • Location

    Kahoku, Nishimurayama District, Yamagata, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    International Royal Architecture
  • Design Team

    Akinori Kasegai , Daisuke Tsunakawa
  • Structure design

    KAP
  • Area

    197.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

© Nobuaki Nakagawa © Nobuaki Nakagawa © Nobuaki Nakagawa © Nobuaki Nakagawa +42

Lightweight Concrete Structure Wins Competition for New Gramalote Market Plaza

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
Lightweight Concrete Structure Wins Competition for New Gramalote Market Plaza, Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto
Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto

In 2010, the town of Gramalote in Colombia was destroyed by a catastrophic mudslide, triggered by heavy rainfall and a series of small earthquakes. Now the town is being rebuilt from scratch in a new location, and the government has introduced architectural competitions for the town's major public buildings, including a high school, sports center, a cultural center, a public market, an elderly home and a farmer center.

Architects Rodrigo Chain and Jheny Nieto have shared their winning design for the New Gramalote Market Plaza with us, a structure of 15 concrete modules that occupies a steeply sloping site. Read on after the break for more on the design.

Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto Courtesy of Rodrigo Chain + Jheny Nieto +6

A House for the Future Inspired by Alice in Wonderland

00:00 - 7 June, 2014
A House for the Future Inspired by Alice in Wonderland, The space is filled with inventive details, including a 100-year-old stoneware tub (above) and a wall of 573 tools for the kitchen-cum-workshop (below). Image Courtesy of Constantin Meyer/Koelnmess
The space is filled with inventive details, including a 100-year-old stoneware tub (above) and a wall of 573 tools for the kitchen-cum-workshop (below). Image Courtesy of Constantin Meyer/Koelnmess

If you could design the ideal house of the future, what would it look like? Given the opportunity to answer this question, interior and product designer Louise Campbell turned to an unlikely source – Alice in Wonderland. To learn how the fairytale influenced the design, check out the following article, originally published as Through the Looking Glass on Metropolis Magazine.

Every year, the imm Cologne furniture fair hosts Das Haus, a life-size model of an ideal future house. In the past, architects and product designers—such as Zaha Hadid and Naoto Fukasawa in 2007— have teamed up to design their dream house, without pesky constraints like clients or budget. This year, Louise Campbell wore both hats. An interior and product designer, Campbell created what looked like a machine for communal living (or maybe the dwelling of a well-heeled Scandinavian commune).

L’Orange de Ris / Edouard Francois

01:00 - 7 June, 2014
L’Orange de Ris / Edouard Francois, © Paul Raftery
© Paul Raftery
  • Architects

  • Location

    Chemin de Montlhéry, 91130 Ris-Orangis, France
  • Design Team

    Maison Edouard François, CET Ingénierie (BET TCE)
  • Area

    4350.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

© Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery +23